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Not in Ohio.

Dryness in parts of MI, imo, had local birds leaving early.
Some may show up in ohio a bit earlier than usual...or they may stack up north.

With woodcock, part of their appeal is never figuring them out.
Be pretty boring to know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You are spot on. I spent the first 28 years living in Michigan. I was (and still am) an avid bird hunter of grouse, woodcock and pheasant. I can recall days in central MI where I would flush 7-8 grouse and 20 woodcock when the flights began. They also have a winter grouse season that used to run from Dec 1 - January 31st. Thoroughly enjoyed hunting grouse in the snow.

I have been trying to track the flight data here in Central OH for years. I have a couple honey holes that hold birds before the flights but end of October is typically good but that can extend through the first 2 weeks of November. A friend of mine does some hunting of woodcock in January in South Carolina and he and his pup have a great 2-3 days down there.
 

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I hunted ruffed grouse in the Ohio snow many times, too many actually...as snow conditions re dog paws was about all there was to limit days at them, which is so unlike days afield to the North or in the mountains.
However, there is little to stir the blood like grouse tracks leading both the imagination and our own footsteps.
I also still recall woodcock tracks in a January snow tight along a creek and wondered what the proud, soft-flying bogsucker made of finding snow and cold invertebrates along his yearly path south or, in this case, North.
"Yikes!", perhaps.

Your migrations dates are as most of us have known.
GBE would mark finding woodcock in Canaan around the first week of November but would also be notified by locals.."the birds are in, George" or some such, when his expectations amounted to little but hopeful guesses.
Were I to guess, I would guess that a triple handful of reasons affect the migration timing, the dribble or the flow of the birds down several flight paths.
With conditions for northern locals, like this year, speeding their departure date but not necessarily influencing arrival times...one just does not know.

Meaningful snow is forecast Up Nort in a day or so and that will release some birds while halting others.
I suspect ground conditions from timber cuts to age class realities to development, weather and a peck more have and will continue to alter our once counted upon and assumed traditional ..."let's go".
The birds simply must adjust to change and so must we.....as well as accepting what we find...adjust and accept are not always saddle pards.

The little trundler is one of the more difficult birds to study.....fingers crossed for it tho the Government is, oddly enough, seemingly doing well as regards the bird, seasons, etc.
WE, on the other hand, appear to place too slight a value on either the bird's needs or the importance of what the bird needs....beyond the bird itself.
 

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When I was a serious grouse hunter, I loved seeing the “little fellers” and occasionally taking a couple. But I loved reading both Evans and Spiller sing their praises!!!
I hunted ruffed grouse in the Ohio snow many times, too many actually...as snow conditions re dog paws was about all there was to limit days at them, which is so unlike days afield to the North or in the mountains.
However, there is little to stir the blood like grouse tracks leading both the imagination and our own footsteps.
I also still recall woodcock tracks in a January snow tight along a creek and wondered what the proud, soft-flying bogsucker made of finding snow and cold invertebrates along his yearly path south or, in this case, North.
"Yikes!", perhaps.

Your migrations dates are as most of us have known.
GBE would mark finding woodcock in Canaan around the first week of November but would also be notified by locals.."the birds are in, George" or some such, when his expectations amounted to little but hopeful guesses.
Were I to guess, I would guess that a triple handful of reasons affect the migration timing, the dribble or the flow of the birds down several flight paths.
With conditions for northern locals, like this year, speeding their departure date but not necessarily influencing arrival times...one just does not know.

Meaningful snow is forecast Up Nort in a day or so and that will release some birds while halting others.
I suspect ground conditions from timber cuts to age class realities to development, weather and a peck more have and will continue to alter our once counted upon and assumed traditional ..."let's go".
The birds simply must adjust to change and so must we.....as well as accepting what we find...adjust and accept are not always saddle pards.

The little trundler is one of the more difficult birds to study.....fingers crossed for it tho the Government is, oddly enough, seemingly doing well as regards the bird, seasons, etc.
WE, on the other hand, appear to place too slight a value on either the bird's needs or the importance of what the bird needs....beyond the bird itself.
 

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Is anyone finding woodcock? While I have only been out a couple of times in Ohio, they are nothing more than walks in the woods. Hunted Resthaven this morning, where I can usually find a couple…nothing. It was very dry, ditches that usually hold water were bone dry. Going to move east tomorrow
 

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Just got back Monday from the Atlanta/Fletchers Pond area. Ran into a guy this past friday and his dog got on a couple woodcock. On Sunday, i seen him again at the same place and said his dog pointed 5 that day.
 

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Coming back from Southern Iron/
Dickinson county area today. We had just a light dusting here but lots of wind M-W. Snow got deeper further north. We did point a few grouse one woodcock.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Flushed one last week in Harrison county. Typical woodcock area. Side of a hill in a heavy canopy woods that’s somewhat marshy ish cover.
 
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