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There are several things that determine how far a bullet will go when shot from a gun. The first thing that we think of is velosity and it is about 1/2 of the story. The other 1/2 is a mix of thing, weight of the bullet, diameter of the bullet and it shape. If we increase the wieght of the bullet and the other things remain the same the bullet will go farther. If we increase the diameter fo the bullet other thing remaining the same, the bullet won`t go as far. For the average shooter to set down and try to do the math and figure out how far his rifle will shoot is about imposible unless we cheat alittle. That`s why we use the B.C. ( ballistic Coefficent ) of the bullet to figure how far our gun will shoot. The B.C. of a given bullet is fiugred useing the bullet weight, diameter, shape ect. There is no way a shooter can figure the B.C. of a bullet without a college degree in math, but thank heavens most bullet manufacture give us the B.C. of their bullets, and in alot of cases a chart so that all we have to do is look up the velosity and the B.C. of the bullet and the chart will give us the path of the bullet.
Any bullet with a given B.C., regardless of the caliber of the bullet, will travel the same distance if fired at the same velosity. This make it easy for us to tell which round will shoot the flatest. The bullet going the fastest will shoot the flatest because it will go the farthest because any bullet will fall to earth at the same rate, if fire horzintal to flat ground will hit the ground at the same time, the faster just hitting it alot farther from you.
The B.C. of a bullet make easy for us to figure the bullet path, but has nothing to do with it`s terminal performance, and should be a secondary consideration when chooseing a hunting bullet. I hope this may help some of you that are just getting started shooting.
 
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