Ohio Sportsman - Your Ohio Hunting and Fishing Resource banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now there seem like a lot of competent and skilled bowhunters here and quite a few new ones. I myself would consider myself a well versed hunter but am beginning anew. I still had an incredible teacher when I was younger who taught me a lot of skills. So I thought some people(myself included) might give a few tips that could help out everyone.

Now there are still in my opinion only two ways of hunting. There is the stalk and there is the sit. I was taught to stalk. We didn't do much in the way of deer stands in Eastern Kentucky at least the guy who taught me (Robert who was half cherokee) didn't so he taught me how to mainly stalk. So I will try and give a few tips that have to do with avoidance.

I have told my burying the clothes trick a few times as he taught me. During season he said he rarely if ever ate meat during season. Would stick to vegetables and most importantly as I have stated APPLES.. Guy would mow down apples like no tomorrow. He said he wanted to smell like a large apple.

So as to avoidance there are a few simple steps.

One obviously especially with all the market now is smell. I still believe natural is way better then a pure cover scent or neutralizer. During season Robert would only wash from the small branch which ran right by his house. I honestly wouldn't suggest this in Ohio during November cuz that stuff is just COLD.. In Kentucky it wasn't so bad. It was chilly mind you but not mind numbing. Now he wouldn't take a full bath or anything but would wash his "areas". Then he would yep rub'em down with an apple. This would mean even if he was upwind while it wouldn't cover everything it would still give mainly the smell of apples or so he said and the amount of deer and the size of deer would leave no doubt the man knew how to hunt..

Second is stalking. Robert was good enough he could get within yards of a deer and I even saw him touch a doe more then once when he was teaching me. You can call BS all you want but I saw it. He tried to teach me and I could get close but never that close. A few simple tricks he taught me were when to stalk and when not to. If it has been really dry. You will never get close. Best time to stalk is on a morning after a bit of rain when everything is wet. He would always wear soft soled shoes. I mean very very soft soled. Most of the hard soled hunting boots now just won't work for stalking.

When you are walking especially if it hasn't rained remember to pick your feet up and try to place the whole foot down at once. I naturally walk on the balls of my foot so this was a difficult thing for me to learn. What is even worse is walking heel to toe. Although if it is really dry the ball of your foot is much better then heel. Stalking takes a lot of leg strength since you are crouched almost the entire time. Remember to use any higher brush around that you can and use that as your LoS towards the deer. GO SLOW. I mean incredibly slow if you can. Robert said around 5 feet per minute was about right when you are beginning. The patience it takes to get to that point does take awhile but is well worth it.

Also the terrain. Walking in leaves is just bad. Always look for grass or flat rock and clean dirt. Never walk on stones. Stones are doom for ya. If you are hunting in hills (which we don't have in Northwest Ohio where I hunt) try and stay below the deer. It is there natural tendency to look up and above them when you are in hill country.

Remember any noise that you make and you can hear it. They hear it just as well even 40 yards away. Remember to stay calm. Slow even breaths. This helps you keep your slow steady pace and not to get worked up. This takes lot and lots of practice so if it takes you awhile don't fret. I spent almost a whole summer every day with him while he was teaching me and I was never even 1/10th as good as he was but I am a very competent stalker.

I am quite rusty in other techniques so I hope some of the guys here can give some good pointers.

Btw if you still think I am just FoS. Say the word and I have pics of my last couple of stalks that I got within 10-15 yards. They are bad pics since I just had my cell with me and it's like a 3 MP..

Bear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Bear, first off great write up! well said and some good info and knowledge for new and well schooled hunters. i have come to appreciate the ground sitting and stalking much more lately. there is hardly anything that gets my pulse racing more than calling in a big ole buck from the ground and having him walk right up to ya, when you can hear their breath, you know you're doing something right. i hunted a stand almost all season last year, passed up a few younger bucks that were within a sticks throw away, but it just didnt do it for me. dont get me wrong, i loved every minute of it, but there is still something better about being on the ground with the animal.
I wanna try to get a legitimate archers ghillie suit made for this season, not a bought one. im talking all the dyed jute, grass, leaves, anything to get that extra edge, hell maybe ill just start rubbing down with apples before every hunt. again, well written sir
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
A Trick to tree stand hunting my friend used to tell me to do when I talked about getting tree stand. This is a bit before range finders were inexpensive and so prevalent.. He would take 6 stakes. A few feet in length ya know.. Take some food coloring and dye the top of the stake. Then him and his brother would go to the tree stand and he would take an archery target. We used to use those small lightweight square ones but can obviously use whichever one you have and is easy to carry..

Well go get in your tree stand. Then in your left lane you sight in your pins on that target and then when you get the range in you place the stake in.Then do the same for your right lane. When you're in a tree stand it really varies on your range and he said it takes a while to really be able to judge it correctly. Just make sure you use the correct color to correlate to your pin colors and you're good to go.

I haven't actually done this one yet as I have only hunted in a tree stand a couple of times and never took that much preperation..
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,399 Posts
Cool stuff. Tell us about the burying of the clothes. I don't remember reading that post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
It's just a scent control tactic really. As most of you remember we didn't always have all these scent neutralizers. We could always spray scent on us but as I have mentioned before we've all seen how that goes. (
) lol..

Anyways so Robert taught me to just bury my clothes. Just wash your clothes normally but no need for detergents. Then hang them out to dry. Then he would use a few apples to bury with his clothes. He would cut them in half and throw them in a burlap sack. Then he would just dig a small pit like 6 inches deep or so right next to his house and throw the sack in the hole and then bury it or cover it back up. Throw a piece of plywood on top of it to keep out the varmints and poof all done..

Would be all sorts of tricks you could do with it though. To really help avoid the need for the scent neutralizers. I mean no offense to any of the companies who make the product or anyone who uses them but do we really honestly believe that the deer can't smell something that is foreign?

Even basic water has a smell to it as does the chlorine in your tap water. Reason you bury the clothes is to give a much more natural odor to them. I've done the burying clothes thing each and every year I've hunted and I have had great results with it. Hope it can help some of you other guys. Btw always leave your clothes hanging outside after your hunts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
From Sunday morning I am about 4 yards in the woods. I had just walked up on them to a spot I know they feed at. The cover is pretty good and the ground is perfect. It's all knocked down grass and dirt within 10 yards of the field edge. They are about 7-10 yards into the field so I am prolly within 15-20 yards give or take. I can never get a pic of the 6 point I walk up on cuz he's crazy skittish and aware. If I roll a stone or even drag one foot he stops and stares for 3 or 4 minutes..

Also a thing I do when I am stalking sometimes is try to sound like a squirrel. I know that sounds funny but you will never be totally silent and if you give them some noise that they know. They might not be so worried about what it is.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,369 Posts
Something I think is extremely basic but I see a ton of people do it every year...your hunting clothes should get worn one place and one place only: the woods on your hunts. I can't stand seeing the line of guys to get tags the night before the bow opener in WalMart and half of them are wearing their camo. Why? All you are doing is contaminating them with odor. Put them on right before going into the woods, take them off when you come out of the woods. They don't need to be worn in the truck or to the gas station or to the grocery store. I watched a pay hunter last fall cook dinner over a stove in his camo. Wouldn't you know it, he got winded daily. I wonder why? :nono:

My hunting buddies and I have gotten to the point where we won't even wear our camo shirts/jackets on the walks in or out. Strip down to the t-shirt or whatever your base layer of clothes happens to be and pack the camo in that you don't want to sweat through. Little things make a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would normally just do it every Saturday evening out of habit. Then grab'em back up on Monday morning..Now I would probably do the same. At least attempt to smell your clothes. Once it begins to fade from that earthy smell. Just rebury them overnight. It doesn't have to sit in there for a week or anything although I like a few days before season.

Think of it like an old cast iron skillet. Once it is seasoned it takes just a little bit to keep it in good condition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
GREAT tips Bear!

I won't at all claim to be an expert at this, but read the following and it seemed to make sense (whoever said 'act like a squirrel' brought this to mind-

When stalking, move with the 'heartbeat' of the woods. The 'hearbeat' being the movement that already exists...squirrels, wind gusts, birds in the leaves; and if close enough, the deer itself. Mimicking the 'beat'/cadence is the key.

I'm still hoping that Ohio harbors a rare bird that roosts about 20' up a tree and emits a slow, deep, snoring sound.

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well forgive me this is sounds a bit strange since I have been at the bar most of the night. I grew up in Ohio at least I went to school here. I just feel everything important that stayed with me I honestly learnt while I was in Kentucky. My dad and his family are from Morgan county just outside West Liberty.

I am sure a lot of people remember it from the horrendous tornado that just went through there. I was in Kentucky every vacation I had as a kid though. I just always felt it was home. Ohio not so much. Not that Ohio doesn't have great people and is a bad place. It was just never a place I wanted to find myself forever due to my passions which mainly lied in other areas.

On the farm it was just freedom. Not that my folks were strict but I would go down there and spend 10 hours just wandering around. In the woods every chance I got. We had 3 channels on the farm til I was in my teens so wasn't much point in watching M.A.S.H as good of a show as it is every chance I could..

So I would go and buy bricks of .22 ammo and just go hunt and shoot. I would go through around a brick a week and around 10 bricks during summer vacation.

I always went down mainly by myself to give my folks some breathing room since I could be rambunctious to say the least. My dad wasn't very intuitive when it came to hunting not because he couldn't hunt but his own words stated he had bambi complex.

He grew up hunting almost every day squirrels and rabbits and after Vietnam he was just unwilling to hunt. So I had to learn a lot myself until Robert kind of took me under his wing when I was around 13 or 14. I was already a crack shot and no BS I mean a crack shot. I have trophy's around the house of halfass tournaments I went to using that same open site 10/22 ruger I learned how to hunt with.

These guys were using Anschutz (sp) 2K guns and my gun I could pick up at a wal-mart for nearly nothing. I just liked to shoot and loved being in the woods so hunting kind of came naturally. As I said it was always about the challenge for me. Robert moved me from rifle to bow and learning the finesse to the hunt..


Wow me and writing effing books. I do apologize skip everything I wrote and focus on my helpful tips! Oh yeah btw once again if you missed it in that barrage of text. Morgan county Kentucky, between Salyersville and West Liberty.


Bear..

Just say no to beer and liquor and kids you'll do fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
GREAT tips Bear!

I won't at all claim to be an expert at this, but read the following and it seemed to make sense (whoever said 'act like a squirrel' brought this to mind-

When stalking, move with the 'heartbeat' of the woods. The 'hearbeat' being the movement that already exists...squirrels, wind gusts, birds in the leaves; and if close enough, the deer itself. Mimicking the 'beat'/cadence is the key.

I'm still hoping that Ohio harbors a rare bird that roosts about 20' up a tree and emits a slow, deep, snoring sound.

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
It does. It's a dove with a deviated septum. Hear'em all the time during gun season. They are only out for a short time.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top