Ohio Sportsman - Your Ohio Hunting and Fishing Resource banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,472 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I consider the single most important calling aspect that has brought them to the gun over the years, it has to be calling immediately after a gobble. The best part of turkey hunting for me is interacting with the birds. It’s reassuring to make a call and have a gobbler answer. But the reality is, most of the time, you’re simply saying “here I am” and he’s just firing back “here I am.” When you answer him or cut his call, it builds his confidence or makes him feel good about himself, so to speak. This often increases his comfort level and encourages him to seek you out.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,968 Posts
When I consider the single most important calling aspect that has brought them to the gun over the years, it has to be calling immediately after a gobble. The best part of turkey hunting for me is interacting with the birds. It's reassuring to make a call and have a gobbler answer. But the reality is, most of the time, you're simply saying "here I am" and he's just firing back "here I am." When you answer him or cut his call, it builds his confidence or makes him feel good about himself, so to speak. This often increases his comfort level and encourages him to seek you out.
Nice I'll keep that in mind. Thanks for the tip!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,443 Posts
When I consider the single most important calling aspect that has brought them to the gun over the years, it has to be calling immediately after a gobble. The best part of turkey hunting for me is interacting with the birds. It's reassuring to make a call and have a gobbler answer. But the reality is, most of the time, you're simply saying "here I am" and he's just firing back "here I am." When you answer him or cut his call, it builds his confidence or makes him feel good about himself, so to speak. This often increases his comfort level and encourages him to seek you out.
I have one caveat to that point but otherwise agree. Dont do it while they are still on the roost more than once or twice. I was talking with a guy at church Sunday who was having trouble hunting the group of turkeys around his house. Long story short is he was getting real close every morning but the birds wouldnt close the final 50 yards. I asked him to tell me what the birds were doing and how he was dealing with that. He started out by saying, "I have them gobbling on the roost for 20 min every morning, double and triple gobbling at every cut and yelp I make". I stopped him there and recommended that after they gobble on their own in the tree to do a soft tree yelp just a few minutes before flydown. If they gobble at the "soft" yelp then go quiet. When you hear them hit the ground you can do a flydown, if not in sight. Curious to see how my strategy works for him after 3 weeks of him making a group of Toms gobble 300 times a morning. Guess I will know Sunday
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,597 Posts
Good advice . I also call sparingly , if I even call at all to birds in the tree . Let em know your there . Call once or maybe twice softly at most whether they answer or not . If they answer the first soft yelps do not call again till they hit the ground .
As for Mike's advice . I've found that spot on as well....not that my opinion matters . But if I have a bird cut me off while calling I instantly go back at him with excited yelps and cuts .
It's easy to overcall to birds ,but making the right calls at the right times helps immensly .
Another tip that's helped me is waiting to make my first call till I'm set up ready to kill him . If he'll gobble on his own just take your time , slip in close and be setup in a good spot to kill him before you make your first call . Sometime while prospecting ya gotta make some calls to get em located , but I hate calling much at a bird just to make him gobble .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
A lot of people screw up their hunt before it begins by calling on the roost. I’ve always recommended staying quiet during that time, and if you do call only do tree yelps if you know how to do them. Also just do enough for him to know where you are and go silent after that until fly down.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,472 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I rarely call to birds on the roost, allthough I’m a huge proponent of roosting birds the night before. We’ve had a bird roosted every night since the season came in and killed 15 in 14 mornings of hunting...most before 7 am...there’s a bunch of 2 year olds this year. Sneaking inside thier comfort zone in the pre-dawn darkness is lethal.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,968 Posts
I rarely call to birds on the roost, allthough I'm a huge proponent of roosting birds the night before. We've had a bird roosted every night since the season came in and killed 15 in 14 mornings of hunting...most before 7 am...there's a bunch of 2 year olds this year. Sneaking inside thier comfort zone in the pre-dawn darkness is lethal.
I know one thing, you boys always hammer the turkeys. Bilman and I was talking about pouring the coals on a bird to keep him coming after he has committed. Your basically saying stay aggressive with him after he has committed and is closing distance correct?? It's been a long time ago since I was blessed with that beautiful spring morning, but if memories serves me correctly, you guys were being super aggressive when those birds headed our way that morning. Are you cutting, purring, yelping, as well. Its been too long. Basically are you going the whole nine yards or just answering his every gobble and even cutting him off with yelping alone?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
This is exactly what a buddy taught me this weekend and it worked out flawlessly. He said his favorite call is just the cluck, and his best way to bring them in is to not respond the second time and wait for the bird to gobble and when he does just cut him off. He did that and man that bird fired right back up and ran in on us quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
I am gonna have to disagree with not calling to them on the roost (but with several exceptions).
If you are hunting pressured birds then there's no point in getting them fired up on the roost bc they are just gonna fly down and shut up. Or if you are hunting an area you know has other hunters in the woods, then there's no point in getting birds fired up on the roost bc more times than not, your fellow hunter will try and move in on the gobbling bird and end up screwing up your hunt.
If I am hunting I am hunting non-pressured birds then here's my strategy:
- move to a known "safe" location that you know the birds will be in the general area of at zero dark thirty.
- wait for the first bird to start sounding off then wait a couple more minutes before moving in to ensure there are no satellite roosted birds that will spook.
- move in no closer than 150-200 yards from them and setup.
- get them hammering back a few times then shut up until fly down.
- let him gobble on the roost and get frustrated that the hen he had been talking to has stopped talking back.
- at fly down get him fired up again soon as his feet hit the dirt, then shut up. He will come looking.
- close him with a few soft purrs and clucks and hope hope the turkey gods are smiling upon you that morning to finish the rest of the job!
I have been very fortunate to fill both tags just about every year for many years now, and have watched a lot of other long beards die for friends and family using this method.
Good luck and be safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,143 Posts
When I consider the single most important calling aspect that has brought them to the gun over the years, it has to be calling immediately after a gobble. The best part of turkey hunting for me is interacting with the birds. It's reassuring to make a call and have a gobbler answer. But the reality is, most of the time, you're simply saying "here I am" and he's just firing back "here I am." When you answer him or cut his call, it builds his confidence or makes him feel good about himself, so to speak. This often increases his comfort level and encourages him to seek you out.
This method worked great for me this year. I only used clucks and yelps sparingly though. The only time I didn't call after his gobble was when he sounded very close, which I am guessing was only 50 or 60 yards from where I was set up. I had read when they are that close even if you can't see them, to be quiet because they already know exactly where you are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,400 Posts
This method worked great for me this year. I only used clucks and yelps sparingly though. The only time I didn't call after his gobble was when he sounded very close, which I am guessing was only 50 or 60 yards from where I was set up. I had read when they are that close even if you can't see them, to be quiet because they already know exactly where you are.
Soft clucks and purrs work great when they're close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
665 Posts
I rarely call to birds on the roost, allthough I'm a huge proponent of roosting birds the night before. We've had a bird roosted every night since the season came in and killed 15 in 14 mornings of hunting...most before 7 am...there's a bunch of 2 year olds this year. Sneaking inside thier comfort zone in the pre-dawn darkness is lethal.
Can you go into some detail on your nite roosting tactics? I've never been successful at it.
Thanks
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,472 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Can you go into some detail on your nite roosting tactics? I've never been successful at it.
Thanks
IMO, roosting the night before is the most important aspect of killing a gobbler right off the roost in the morning.

I usually don't call until at least 15 minutes after sunset on a clear evening. Maybe a few minutes earlier if it's cloudy. Any earlier than that and you risk the birds being on the ground.

The most effective sound I've found for making a bird gobble on the roost in the evening is a coyote domain howl. Most people use an owl hoot or hen cackle...and they work also...just not as well as a coyote howl. I've had them answer a coyote howl from 3 ridges over and so far off that you question if it was even a gobble. I like to coyote hunt through the winter months and it's not unusual for a gobbler to sound off at midnight in mid January at a coyote howl.

Once a bird is located...an excellent strategy for picking where to sit the following morning is to take a friend along with you. One guy calls from a stationary location while the other guy moves towards the gobbling bird. The caller calls every minute or so, keeping the bird located while the other guy moves into position. Once the right place to set up is located, mark the spot with a piece of toilet paper or handkerchief or anything that's easily found in the dark the next morning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I will have to say every day and every bird is different in its own way. Knowing when to fire up the call and blast the reeds until they tear apart and when to simply tickle him with a soft purr is what makes each hunt special. That’s why most woodsmen will have at least 2 or 3 calls, and when to switch to something different when the old standbys let you down. Some of your old timers will just pack a single box call or a slate, but those fellas are becoming fewer by the season. I would say you will figure out your own style but don’t be afraid to try doing something different there will be plenty of birds to go back to your comfort zone tomorrow or the day after. I will say if you are hunting pressured birds or on public property the more aggressive you call the more likely you will call in another hunter in Ohio. If you like to run and gun be careful in Ohio on public ground as I have seen folks set up at every gate between fields or in all four corners of a field not making a peek just sitting waiting to ambush.

So I put this to you do you want to be a turkey caller, a ambusher, or a woodsman.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
I will have to say every day and every bird is different in its own way. Knowing when to fire up the call and blast the reeds until they tear apart and when to simply tickle him with a soft purr is what makes each hunt special. That's why most woodsmen will have at least 2 or 3 calls, and when to switch to something different when the old standbys let you down. Some of your old timers will just pack a single box call or a slate, but those fellas are becoming fewer by the season. I would say you will figure out your own style but don't be afraid to try doing something different there will be plenty of birds to go back to your comfort zone tomorrow or the day after. I will say if you are hunting pressured birds or on public property the more aggressive you call the more likely you will call in another hunter in Ohio. If you like to run and gun be careful in Ohio on public ground as I have seen folks set up at every gate between fields or in all four corners of a field not making a peek just sitting waiting to ambush.

So I put this to you do you want to be a turkey caller, a ambusher, or a woodsman.
I like being all of those ! True every hunt is different and different type calls, or I should say different sounding calls may be needed ! If your calling from a location that a bird was spooked or missed in or if you by chance are using the same type or sounding call that he was using, you have got to change locations and maybe go to a different sounding call, If a bird is answering and not coming most times he is with hens and probably won't come unless it is late in the season or his hen gives him the slip then he will come, or the prior may be true and changing locations, a couple hundred yards maybe and calls may be all it takes ! Some things the turkeys do I feel stay pretty much the same and that can only be learned through experience, I have tried to give some not so common tips in the past and was called basically a liar, so I will keep them to myself ! A turkey isn't as smart as many think they are just being turkeys, but they have keen hearing and eye sight and that's what saves the most of them that hunters goof on ! I have killed more than one gobbler by giving sometimes only two clucks AFTER they fly down, it may take them a while to come in and they may come with little or no gobbling or they may come real fast and gobble the whole way in ! That's brings up an important point ! ALWAYS be set up before calling, when you have heard a bird and it is a good rule to follow even if you have not heard one ! I have done later in the day what they call walk and talk, and that's just what it is you walk and call at different locations trying to locate a bird, I have had responses already and had to try and find a tree to get up against, and also have heard them and seen them at about the same time, if I don't set up first while walking and talking I will in the very least stand close to a spot that I can set up if I have to real fast ! As far as calls I no longer carry a box call, I carry several different sounding mouth calls and a slate call and several strikers that again make the call sound different ! So by doing this I go lighter and still have over a half dozen different turkey call sounds !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
And I forgot to mention if you seem to be struggling to get responses look into getting calls that are not in every city weekend warriors gear bag. I quiver every year when I hear a Quaker boy or Kight and Hale call and run the other way as fast as my crippled old knees will carry me. If you think that after the first week that the birds haven’t heard the calls sold at Walmart I have some great turkey hunting property in Iceland for sale. Look online at Midwest turkey call they have a huge selection some great slates and strikers that have never seen public property in Ohio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
And I forgot to mention if you seem to be struggling to get responses look into getting calls that are not in every city weekend warriors gear bag. I quiver every year when I hear a Quaker boy or Kight and Hale call and run the other way as fast as my crippled old knees will carry me. If you think that after the first week that the birds haven't heard the calls sold at Walmart I have some great turkey hunting property in Iceland for sale. Look online at Midwest turkey call they have a huge selection some great slates and strikers that have never seen public property in Ohio.
Like you say, there are a lot of different strikers and this can make the calls that most people may be using sound totally different, also the way you hold them makes them sound different too ! I make my own slate calls out of those little slate chalk boards we all had when we were little, with the little wooden frame around them, all you need is the slate cut in different shapes small enough that they will fit in your cupped hand, and you can put them in a cup if you want, but it is not needed, and you will have a sound that is different then other slate calls !
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
I always appreciate these types of threads. I consider myself an average turkey hunter at best. Luckily, I currently have access to some properties with solid turkey numbers. If it weren't for the abundance of two year olds. I'd probably go home empty handed much more often. Keep the tips coming, I need all the help I can get.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top