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Yes, I believe without a doubt the moon effects all game movement and feeding patterns. I have been trying to pay very close attention to the moon in relation to my game sightings the last few years. I have found that by watching the moon rise and set tables and hunting when the moon is overhead during daylight hours I see much more game. It frustrated me for years how some days deer were every place I looked while other days I couldnt find one with a search warrant. I now believe the moon is the difference between the "busy" days and the "slow" days. By simply monitoing the moon for a couple of months you will prove this to yourself. Good luck .
 

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it probably has some effect when its lighter in the night time .i do not see any difference and do not change my tactics...the concern i have is that i'm sure there are those that hang around to 9pm on a moonlit night,looking for mr. nocturnal(mr.big)...
 

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I'm not really sure on this one still trying to figure this one out myself,Some say it does and some say it hog wash???
 

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I'm with Cb , I'm not sure about it and try not to read into it too much.
 

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I have seen a definate impact on deer movement times based upon the moon phases.

The two that seem to affect the movement times the most are a full and dark moon. I see limited effect in the half moon phases.

Kim
 

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I don't get out enough to chart the moon and pick and choose the days I need to get out for most success, I just go when I can.
 

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I don't pay as much attention to the moon as I do Barometric Pressure. The rising and falling of the BP has alot to do with deer movement.
 

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Spitfire , I have heard that to be true with fishing also. A rise or lower in pressure may be bad fishing, But a steady pressure is a sign of good fishing. I may be wrong , but I think thats the way I heard it.
 

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Thats a what I went by growing up near the rivers.
 

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Lureboy, Barometric Pressure is the #1 weather indicator that I pay attention to before going to the woods. Nine times out of ten I can predict how much deer movement I am going to see.
Whitetails seem to favor a moving barometer to a steady one. A rising Barometer (such as high pressure moving in after a storm) verses a falling one and a steady high barometer verses a steady low one seems to promote the best activity.
I hope this helps if not let me know, i'll dig something up for ya and send you a PM.
 

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I will post a few things that I found. They explain it better than I would.
 

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Understanding Air Pressure

The air's pressure is caused by the weight of the air pressing down on the Earth, the ocean and on the air below. Earth's gravity, of course, causes the downward force that we know as "weight." Since the pressure depends on the amount of air above the point where you're measuring the pressure, the pressure falls as you go higher.

The air's pressure also changes with the weather. Air pressure, in fact, is one of the important factors affecting the weather. For more on this see:
 

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A falling Barometer means feeding deer

It seems far-fetched to think of a gauge on your wall that can tell you when it's a good time to hunt, but a barometer does exactly that. It measures the changing weight of air, or atmospheric pressure. Cold, dry air registers higher readings on the barometer than warm, wet air. So, large air masses of cold, dry air are called highs, and masses of warm, moist air are called lows. Highs, or high readings on the barometer, are associated with fair weather. Lows, or low readings on the barometer, are associated with stormy weather. Falling barometric pressure can indicate that a storm is coming in even before nice weather starts to turn nasty.

The activity of whitetails increases, making them more visible to hunters, with falling barometric pressure. Deer feel the change in pressure in their ears and other sensitive areas of their bodies. They have been conditioned, over the centuries, to read this change as a warning of an incoming storm. Their increased activity is associated with heavier feeding to fill their bellies before they are forced to take refuge from the stormy weather. So, when the barometer falls, start to hunt where whitetails like to eat.

I hope this helps!
 
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