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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put it off every year. It seems there is a bunch of preparation required getting a leg hold trap from store to field. Is it possible to order traps and bait and get them setup quickly and be successful? From what I have read, the trap needs to hang to air out and this may take weeks. After viewing the coyotes on my trail cams recently, I want to trap them as soon as possible. Sorry for the long winded explanation. I'm just looking for help to buy traps, dye & wax them and set them in as short of time as possible
 

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Never an expert on trapping...only an "assistant tag-along" with a real trapper for a couple years. I don't know the answer to your question.

However, if it is coyotes only you want to target, you can certainly purchase died and ready to go snares. I like the Dakotaline deathblow loaded snares it kills them instantly rather than you shooting them or them battling & choking their self out entangled. You can get them in pale rider and ghost rider - I use both. The pale rider works great along side swamps, cattail, grassy openings, field edges and some logging trails. They come with the required deer stops you just crimp em down.

Honestly no need to get paranoid on the scent when setting them up - I don't even wear gloves (I do wear rubber boots everywhere). Make about a 10 inch loop and crimp your deer stop. Find trails that narrow that contain tracks and set there. I also set all the old skidder and logging roads in the woods even if no tracks - look for a location that is soft and gets muddy - they don't go through that they go around each side. Set both sides in these spots. Block off a piece with downed limbs and set up too.

Nearly any good trail I set is also used by deer. I don't have many issues just block in your set by leaning a branch over your setup maybe 6 inches. The deer will usually jump or step over it and avoid the snare all together. I also will place a subtle small twig in the ground just below the loop...something maybe only3-4 inches out of the ground (nothing more than a few inches). It gets them to raise their head without drawing attention to the set. You won't get them all, but I guarantee if you set it up on a known tracked trail within a few weeks a coyote will be in your snare (or more). Sometimes it is within a day or two.

And the obvious - make sure you don't have hunters with dogs using the property, or just forget about it. I have read and heard of guys saying they still set up snares, but I would never do it even using traditional snares....very likely to end up with one.

Best of luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Best of luck
Thank you FnF! Great tips! I'll check out those snares. I made some a couple of years ago and they just sat in the woods/fields until I came back to collect them. I have a bunch of logging roads and was planning to set leg holds along those banks with baited holes.
 

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In my experience, using footholds for coyotes has been an invitation for them to test their senses against my strengths as a trapper - it's hard. Sure is rewarding when you connect, but it is hard. They're sniffing around your bait, your dirt set where your trap is, the surrounding area where you may have been kneeling to set your trap, there's just a lot more "touch" with footholds. I know guys that use a pee set instead of bait ; they'll buy a coyote urine or lure, put it on what looks like a natural place for a canine to stop and pee, and then place a foothold around that post.

Snares are pretty quick to set and get the coyote when they're just walking along, not stopping to check things out. That's why identifying travel routes and then adding some barriers that might force them to walk a certain direction or way have been more effective for me.

Love reading the trapping talk ; I don't feel like there's enough of it out there! And now that I live in the city without any access to properties to trap, it sure is fun to relive trapping through other people's reports! Good look out there!
 

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cbone as a novice I could not agree more! I tried trapping coyotes in footholds in a densely populated coyote area years ago. Now mind you, I'm admittedly not an experienced trapper. The trapper I followed on his line 2 years WAS a great canine trapper.....especially fox back in the day when there was money in it. I tried like heck one year and part of the next year. I never caught one! They would circle the area - seen tracks a few times. Had a trap dug up and pissed on - seriously! Now I put a lot more effort regarding scent control, etc. than when setting snares. I did catch a gray and a red fox in footholds (set for coyotes), but never a coyote.

Counter that with snares...I don't worry about scent much, don't even wear gloves making the set half the time and if I do it is work gloves that definitely have scent. The very first snare I ever set in my life for coyotes I caught a female dog! It was on the trail for over 2 weeks, but that third week she was there and had put herself down entangled in the tree limb I anchored to.

I'm living proof snaring coyotes is much easier all the way around. Quicker also - once you have done just a few you can make a set pretty quick and move on. But you have to be mindful of the area...any dog hunters, owners dog running loose, etc. and I find another place (especially if setting loaded snares).

Around here the fox have really been running with the breeding season. I have seen 3 red fox in the last week. Was happy to see a few as it seems they are far fewer with the coyotes dominating the areas.
 

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As a hunter that runs hounds, I've been reading this thread with interest. A couple years back, I attended a DOW seminar on hunting and trapping coyotes. There was a strong message to set snares so that if someone's dog got into one, they couldn't become entangled and that the snare would not necessarily be lethal. The thought was that if a dog got into a snare, it wouldn't keep pulling like a coyote would because dogs are use to be tied around the neck.

The thought of a lethal snare is chilling to me so I did a little nosing around and searched for spring loaded snares in Ohio and found this page from ohiostatetrapper.org on legal sets:

Legal sets (there is reference to the OAC code posted below)

The page was from 2013 so thinking the information might not be accurate, I pulled up the Ohio Administrative Code section
1501:31-15-03 Nuisance wild animal control

In the section on snares there is this line:
(v) It shall be unlawful for any person, except a licensed commercial nuisance wild animal control operator, to have attached to or use a spring-loaded, spring-assisted or mechanical device on a snare to assist the snare in capturing or closing around a nuisance wild animal.

and this:

(a) It shall be unlawful for any person to use a spring-loaded, spring-assisted or mechanical device on a snare that is designed or marketed as a lethal snare that has a loop diameter greater than five inches on land.

I'm certainly delving into things that I know very little about but the thought of one of my dogs winding up in a snare scares the crap out of me.
 

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One thing you have to remember about a lot of the old stuff, especially from the fur boom era was that a lot of it was pure speculation or flat out disinformation because competition was high. This late in the season, buy the traps, put your tags on and go set em. Get a good half inch or more of dirt over the trap after you bed it and your good to go.

If your only going to have them out for a few weeks, theres not going to be much corrosion that will happen to the trap unless your using calcium chloride as a freeze proofing method or trapping in highly corrosive soil, especially with as much machine oil thats on the traps when new. After your done with em, then you can pressure wash them then go about dyeing them. wait till next fall to wax them.
 

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As a hunter that runs hounds, I've been reading this thread with interest. A couple years back, I attended a DOW seminar on hunting and trapping coyotes. There was a strong message to set snares so that if someone's dog got into one, they couldn't become entangled and that the snare would not necessarily be lethal. The thought was that if a dog got into a snare, it wouldn't keep pulling like a coyote would because dogs are use to be tied around the neck.

The thought of a lethal snare is chilling to me so I did a little nosing around and searched for spring loaded snares in Ohio and found this page from ohiostatetrapper.org on legal sets:

Legal sets (there is reference to the OAC code posted below)

The page was from 2013 so thinking the information might not be accurate, I pulled up the Ohio Administrative Code section
1501:31-15-03 Nuisance wild animal control

In the section on snares there is this line:
(v) It shall be unlawful for any person, except a licensed commercial nuisance wild animal control operator, to have attached to or use a spring-loaded, spring-assisted or mechanical device on a snare to assist the snare in capturing or closing around a nuisance wild animal.

and this:

(a) It shall be unlawful for any person to use a spring-loaded, spring-assisted or mechanical device on a snare that is designed or marketed as a lethal snare that has a loop diameter greater than five inches on land.

I'm certainly delving into things that I know very little about but the thought of one of my dogs winding up in a snare scares the crap out of me.
Loaded snares are not the same thing as spring loaded snares. Loaded snares are simply snares that have had a bit of memory added to the cable so it holds a more rounded shape and closes faster.

Spring loaded snares have a spring that exerts extra pressure on the snare so they dispatch the animal. They are only used in ohio for groundhog trapping by licensed nuisance trappers.
 

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Loaded snares are not the same thing as spring loaded snares. Loaded snares are simply snares that have had a bit of memory added to the cable so it holds a more rounded shape and closes faster.

Spring loaded snares have a spring that exerts extra pressure on the snare so they dispatch the animal. They are only used in ohio for groundhog trapping by licensed nuisance trappers.
I'm pulling this quote from the 2nd reply of this thread that made me start looking:

" I like the Dakotaline deathblow loaded snares it kills them instantly rather than you shooting them or them battling & choking their self out entangled."

I didn't know that snares would kill something caught in them quickly. So a dog caught in one wouldn't die?
 

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I'm not familiar with those per se but if they are regular snares that don't have springs and they're not set under a fence I've never had issues turning a dog loose. They usually want to go home with me unless they were feral.
 

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Sorry for any confusion - Dakotaline and many others make both loaded snares and spring loaded snares and sniperbbb is right on. Some states allow fur permit holders to use the spring loaded snares in addition to wildlife control.

Again, I am no expert and I have not snared a coyote in probably 8 years. I sold all my last snares to a member on this forum. That said I think I'm going to help a guy in Perry county catch a few...headed down this weekend Sunday after some snow to help him out. They are bad on his land and he has seen more coyotes than rabbits while hunting this rabbit season. Had one barking and chasing 3 does across his hayfield this past Saturday.

The loaded snares equal dead animal in my limited experience. When I first started, depending on the set they may be there alive, or they may have entangled and be dead...it was a mixed bag. After I started using the Dakotaline loaded snares the handful I caught were all DOA. It is an overall small sample size, but none were alive when I showed up and I would expect that result going forward.

A 5 inch diameter equals a 10 inch loop....and that is about what I use. I don't measure I use my hand which is 8 inches from top of wrist to tip of middle finger. I make my loop an inch or a little more longer so it is just under that 5 inch diameter.

Blue - no hound hunter will ever like snares just a fact. Even a properly set non-loaded snare very well may kill the critter that gets into it. Snares and traps are not discriminate. I have seen squirrels and rabbits in footholds many times. I have seen the videos and read about folks releasing a dog from a snare, but I'd bet a lot more end up in the ground...just my opinion. I've never caught a dog so maybe as sniperbb mentioned they would be calm about the situation whereas the wild coyotes freak out. I have had a dog in my life since birth and always will. When I comment about snares I always stress if there is any chance dogs will knowingly be in the area I don't set up and would advise others to act accordingly.

I've said enough any way I'm just a novice. I haven't snared more than a couple dozen coyotes in my lifetime. I know guys that catch nearly that many on a single property up here where I live in a single season. I'm sure more experienced members will chime in. Good luck!
 

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A 10 inch loop is 10 inch diameter. I think you're talking about radius.

Loaded snares have little to do with whether the snare dispatches the animal or not. It can determine whether you catch the animal or not. The locks you use, size of cable, length of snare, entanglement are the determining factors as to whether the snare is lethal or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
bluedog, I hope you can rest a bit easier knowing the area I plan to trap isn't around any houses that own dogs and is all private land. It is used exclusively for hunting deer & turkey. It is also 180 acres that only a friend and I have permission.
 

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sniperbb you are correct (again). There was no loop size limit any way when I set snares in the past. Those loop size limits were for the spring loaded snares because they are used for small critters by animal control (as sniperbb also correctly stated). That loop size limits the snare to only targeted critters and it's too small for larger critters to get caught up in. 5 inch loop is pretty small!

I have always used my hand and set right at that 9-10 inch loop and it seemed to work well. I also use that same hand technique for the height to get it at the level I wanted it.

I'll follow up next week. We plan to set up and do a little calling and see if we can crack one on his farm Saturday evening with the front approaching. Then with fresh snow we are going to poke around and look for nice trails that narrow for him to set snares Sunday morning. I expect him to catch a few if he gets them out. Sounds like he has a real issue he's been seeing so many in daylight. He's giving me permission to night hunt with my thermal, but it is unlikely I hunt it much.
 

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There's been maximum size limits on loops for a while. It was 14, it's now 15.

The 5" power snare loop limit came about in 2014 think, might be off a year, when the nuisance rules were restructured and testing and license fees came about
 

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Thanks for the update! I have not even bothered looking at the rules in some time. Have no plans to do anything personally so won't bother now either. The owner I'm helping has his permit and has been trapping **** mostly the last several years. His grandfather started him into trapping in his teens. He actually has a lot of experience unlike myself, but he has not targeted coyotes until now. I may get in his way, but we plan to do the hunt together and look around. I'm sure I will learn something this weekend and I hope to be of some use. If nothing else I can follow along and do as told - that is what I did for two years with the other trapper:) He loved that he could put another shoulder basket on me and for some reason mine got filled up first and on short lines it was only me with a shoulder basket! I had a better back and more endurance back then:eek:
 

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I really appreciate all the info. Obviously I don't like the thought of something that will kill quickly. I'm always with my dogs and they have GPS collars on so I will eventually know if they are in trouble but depending on how far out they are, it may take awhile to get to them but it would be minutes not hours. I don't know if you remember but years back one of my dogs put his head through an (illegally set) 220 conibear that was in a groundhog hole. I was maybe 75 yards away and heard him scream. I assumed he was in a leghold at first but ran to him and found the conibear around his neck. Somehow through some kind of miracle combined with adrenaline, I got the trap off his neck and he lived. It freaks me out to think I could be happily rabbit hunting and have something like this happen. (Going through ice on creeks and ponds is another one I dread.) Because traps are non-discriminant, it just seems that that killing traps should not be allowed on land. Just my thoughts.
 

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Had a great hunt Saturday prior to the front. First set called one in but it skittered the wood edge around 200 yards and no shots were taken. Made a second sit and 15 minutes in the call brought one right in on us to about 45 yards. Buddy head shot it and it hit the ground dead.

nasty this morning but looked around and found a few prime spots for him to snare. Didn't set any as he isn't quite ready with his schedule. Will get them set by next weekend.

Sky Hunting Military camouflage Deer hunting Cargo pants
 
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