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As this hot summer weather continues, how will we need to change hunt strategies? As it stands right now Ohio will probably end up with at least a 25-30% loss on their corn crop and possibly that much on the beans as well. Both of these guesstimates are if we get some timely rain. Both Indiana and Illinois are expecting at least a 50% loss with many farms along the Ohio river mowing down their cornfields right now. The same can be said for northeast Indiana as well. Harvest is most definitely going to be early this year. Many Ohio fields are at the critical stage of tasseling right now, with very little silking taking place which equals no corn! Another big issue is water, many places deer would normally drink are dry this year, and they do have to drink....so if you can find a creek or pond that is being used it might justify a new stand site! So far my mast and soft mast are doing OK, apples and pears are still on the trees as well as acorns, but if the trees get stressed the fruit is the first thing to go. Lastly, they say a wet year is the best for booners:irked:
 

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We will have rain before Sept. 29th...the deer still have plenty to eat even though the beans and corn won't flourish this year...Beans will be on later..corn will be off earlier...that should help hunting and patterning those sneaky bucks. I know one farmer that mowed down his 40 acre corn field and planted beans already. Beans are more tolerate and can handle the dry weather..to a point!!...I think it will be a good year to kill a monster!!
 

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Corn corn corn. I think corn will be your key area to.hunt this year because if theres no water, a deer will stay by corn and eat it to get its daily value of water

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As this hot summer weather continues, how will we need to change hunt strategies? As it stands right now Ohio will probably end up with at least a 25-30% loss on their corn crop and possibly that much on the beans as well. Both of these guesstimates are if we get some timely rain. Both Indiana and Illinois are expecting at least a 50% loss with many farms along the Ohio river mowing down their cornfields right now. The same can be said for northeast Indiana as well. Harvest is most definitely going to be early this year. Many Ohio fields are at the critical stage of tasseling right now, with very little silking taking place which equals no corn! Another big issue is water, many places deer would normally drink are dry this year, and they do have to drink....so if you can find a creek or pond that is being used it might justify a new stand site! So far my mast and soft mast are doing OK, apples and pears are still on the trees as well as acorns, but if the trees get stressed the fruit is the first thing to go. Lastly, they say a wet year is the best for booners:irked:
Dang wonder if Coonie gon'a raise the price of him deer corn - dang :confused::whistle::mischeif:
 

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I don't think I'm going to have to change anything. There is water close to all my spots I hunt.
 

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Corn corn corn. I think corn will be your key area to.hunt this year because if theres no water, a deer will stay by corn and eat it to get its daily value of water

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The corn will be either hard or cut by the time the season rolls around. Thats the problem we are facing with this drought.

Keying in on water sources and bedding areas leading to feed areas will be my method. I think if the weather plays out like it is now, and it's tough tell three months ahead of time, super early morning and late evening hunts are going to be key.
 

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Lastly, they say a wet year is the best for booners:irked:
Yep- early in the antler production and growing process, water is important.
 

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not sure its a big deal where i hunt...i've seen a lot of droughts over the years and use this to pin point big bucks still in velvet...as they stay near the water holes available...even in long drought years i've noticed little impact on big boys seen later during archery season...but i am a believer a wet year does help antler growth some...droughts are pretty common year after year...hopefully i can get to the beaver ponds this weekend and see what i 'll see...:biggrin:
 

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The corn will be either hard or cut by the time the season rolls around. Thats the problem we are facing with this drought.

Keying in on water sources and bedding areas leading to feed areas will be my method. I think if the weather plays out like it is now, and it's tough tell three months ahead of time, super early morning and late evening hunts are going to be key.
Some farmers planted early around here and are cuttin their corn soon and replantin feild corn. There will be some good feilds here

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Things are really getting critical in parts of Ohio. If we don't get significant rain this weekend we will probably see at least a 50% loss in the corn crop. The beans can hang on a little longer, but not much more than a week or so.
 

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.my fields look terrible if we don't have rain soon I will be feeding hay to my critters and have already lost at least 1/4 of my corn. The beans are doing ok. I have three springs on my property and they have all dried up along with the creak that runs through the valley. Praying for rain

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shoot i had a little half rack buck show up at our pond by our house which is a good 20 ft away from the house to drink water, he then moved onto our lake which is a good 50 yards away, Im thinking about setting up right by the lake haha
 

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We got a little rain today...

Not only for the deer but guys I run a Groundcare Business. We cut a lot of grass not to mention nobody has landscaping done during a drought.. Its bad! That's why I have been on here more than usual...

PLEASE RAIN!!!!!
 

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was in licking and knox this weekend ...corn looked great...seems we have this conversation every year then end up with bumper crops of corn 12'tall...i'll be in athens tomorrow to see how the corn looks...1st ill have to stop at the gas station to fill the truck up with corn juice...:D
 

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was in licking and knox this weekend ...corn looked great...seems we have this conversation every year then end up with bumper crops of corn 12'tall...i'll be in athens tomorrow to see how the corn looks...1st ill have to stop at the gas station to fill the truck up with corn juice...:D
Quit Babblin!
Nearly two-thirds of the nine-state Midwest region was in some stage of drought in the week ended July 10, up from just over 50 percent a week earlier, according to the Drought Monitor, a weekly report on drought throughout the country compiled by U.S. climate experts.

A third of the region was in severe to exceptional drought, up from about a quarter of the region a week earlier, it said.

"The most anomalous conditions covered the lower Ohio Valley, southern Great Lakes, and middle Mississippi Valley, where daily highs averaged 10 to 13 degrees above normal. Additionally, these areas received scant rainfall if any," said Rich Tinker of the Climate Prediction Center.

"The worst conditions (D3 to D4) were assessed along and near the lower Ohio River and in northeastern Indiana, where rainfall was 7 to 11 inches below normal for the last 3 months," he said, referring to the top two categories of drought, extreme and exceptional.

The deepening drought has dragged the yield potential of the developing soybean crop and the pollinating corn crop, which is in a growth stage when its water needs are highest.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture slashed production forecasts for both crops due to the drought, joining scores of private forecasts that have sent grain prices to near-record highs.

The whole of Iowa was classified as abnormally dry as of July 10 and 12.7 percent of the top corn and soybean producing state was in severe drought, up from 0.8 percent the prior week.

Harder-hit Illinois, the No. 2 corn and soy state, was 66.28 percent under severe drought or worse, up from 40 percent the previous week.

Severe to exceptional drought covered 80.15 percent of Indiana, versus 68.84 percent the prior week.

Conditions in Missouri also deteriorated, with 82.54 percent of the state un severe drought or worse, compared with 78.83 percent the week before.

And one more good read with pictures!
http://www.onntv.com/content/blogs/...ght-sends-corn-prices-toward-record-high.html
 

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was in licking and knox this weekend ...corn looked great...seems we have this conversation every year then end up with bumper crops of corn 12'tall...i'll be in athens tomorrow to see how the corn looks...1st ill have to stop at the gas station to fill the truck up with corn juice...:D
I can assure you there won't be a bumper crop in my area, won't even be close.

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well i drove down to athens today from columbus and corn was well over 6"tall all way down...all along the hocking valley...but i do agree we need more rain,i'm running up heck of a water bill keeping my lawn green...:Dit did rain in athens while i was down there...pretty hard north of nelsonville and in hocking county...:D
 
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