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Nomore Wasted Days: The Word of the Day for January 11:

Discussion in 'Sound Off' started by atrkyhntr, Jan 11, 2003.

  1. I always said it was a wasted day when I did not learn one new thing, no matter how small....
    So with that here is "The Word of the Day"

    miscible • \MIH-suh-bul\ • (adjective)
    : capable of being mixed; specifically : capable of mixing in any ratio without separation of two phases

    Example sentence:
    A report on polluted water produced as a by-product of oil mining claims that such water is completely miscible in seawater and dilutes quite rapidly.

    Did you know?
    "Miscible" isn't simply a lesser-known synonym of "mixable"—it's also a cousin. It comes to us from the Medieval Latin adjective "miscibilis," which has the same meaning as "miscible" and which derives in turn from Latin "miscere," meaning "to mix." "Miscere" is also the ultimate source of our "mix," which was combined with the suffix "-able" to form "mixable." "Miscible" turns up most frequently in scientific discussions where it is used especially to describe fluids that don't separate when mixed together.

    OK OK how useless was this information and do we want more each and every day??? :eek: :confused: :D
     
  2. Thanks for wasting 1 minute of my life! Haha just kidding, thanks for sharing.
     

  3. Thanks...for the "word for the day"....:)
     
  4. I always said it was a wasted day when I did not learn one new thing, no matter how small....
    So with that here is "The Word of the Day"


    duplicity • \doo-PLIH-suh-tee\ • (noun)
    : the disguising of true intentions by deceptive words or action

    Example sentence:
    Nicole told me that she had been studying all night, but I detected her duplicity; I knew she had gone to the party.

    Did you know?
    If someone's duplicity has left you feeling like you're seeing double, take heart in the word's etymology. "Duplicity" comes from a long line of "double" talk, starting with its Latin grandparent "duplex," which means "double" or "twofold." As you might expect, "duplex" is also the parent of another term for doubling it up, "duplicate." And of course, the English "duplex" (which can be a noun meaning "a two-family house" or an adjective meaning "double") comes from the Latin word of the same spelling.
     
  5. Good idea,ya never stop learning.
     
  6. Thanks for the great words of the day. Still wondering where I'm going to use them next......;)
     
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