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After completing my move to a new place, I finally got on the water Saturday evening. I hit the Hocking for the first time this year (very odd), and got a mixed bag on one of my best little streamer patterns. I landed 3 little largemouths, one smallie, and a smallmouth buffalo. It was my second career buffalo on the fly, and I was shocked the thing ate it. I sight casted to it in maybe a foot of water.









 

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Nice Carp!
 

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Theres some really nice bigmouth bass in the river ...I have been tole the red eye bass are called Kentucky bass and even red eye bass...l do know for sure theres a lot of the:biggrin:m ...
 

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no i think its very close to small mouth bass...:D
Not sure but it sounds like it might be a rock bass, The definition of where each is found, would favor the rock bass being in the Hocking.

The Redeye bass (Micropterus coosae) is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of order Perciformes. One of the black basses, it is native to only a few rivers in western South Carolina, southwestern North Carolina, northern middle and eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, and portions of Georgia, Alabama, and streams in central Kentucky, and West Virginia, and is uncommon compared to the other species. The waters it is normally found in are cool streams and rivers in the foothills of mountains.

The rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris, Ambloplites constellatus), also known as the rock perch, goggle-eye, or red eye is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of order Perciformes. They are similar in appearance to smallmouth bass but are usually quite a bit smaller. The average rock bass is between 6-10 inches, and they are rarely over a pound. Rock bass are native to the St Lawrence River and Great Lakes system, the upper and middle Mississippi River basin in North America from Québec to Saskatchewan in the north down to Missouri and Arkansas, and throughout the eastern U.S. from New York through Kentucky and Tennessee to the northern portions of Alabama and Georgia and Florida in the south.
 

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Not sure but it sounds like it might be a rock bass, The definition of where each is found, would favor the rock bass being in the Hocking.

The Redeye bass (Micropterus coosae) is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of order Perciformes. One of the black basses, it is native to only a few rivers in western South Carolina, southwestern North Carolina, northern middle and eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, and portions of Georgia, Alabama, and streams in central Kentucky, and West Virginia, and is uncommon compared to the other species. The waters it is normally found in are cool streams and rivers in the foothills of mountains.

The rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris, Ambloplites constellatus), also known as the rock perch, goggle-eye, or red eye is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of order Perciformes. They are similar in appearance to smallmouth bass but are usually quite a bit smaller. The average rock bass is between 6-10 inches, and they are rarely over a pound. Rock bass are native to the St Lawrence River and Great Lakes system, the upper and middle Mississippi River basin in North America from Québec to Saskatchewan in the north down to Missouri and Arkansas, and throughout the eastern U.S. from New York through Kentucky and Tennessee to the northern portions of Alabama and Georgia and Florida in the south.
teyre native to the ohio river which the hocking goes into...many fish up to whites mill swim up from the ohio...thats why theres so many species found there that not common at all above the falls of the hocking...for instance the flathead and drum are not common above the falls as is several others thats very common in the lower section...its a kentucky bass...what i know as rock bass looks more like a bluegill...:biggrin:
 

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:Dfrom what i remember of the red eyes or kentucky bass they looked exactly like a smallie and had red eyes...i read somewhere of another slight difference too...it was either the mouth or gill being a lil different...i have only caught them at whites mill below the falls in athens...rock bass are everywhere...rivers,lakes,farm ponds...and a very strong fighter...:D
 

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i just noticed cream is in the new river channel...it looks like a few hunert yds.below whites mill...:D
 

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I thought so. Now that I go back and look at my pictures from that day at the river, noticed I had a pic of a different fish that I more than likely presumed to be a rock bass. So this must be a kentucky bass/red eye bass then?
 

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Thats what we call them down here in wash,co. Duck creek and the Little Musk, are loaded with them. They just never get very big but still fun to catch.
 

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Those are rock bass. A Kentucky bass looks very similar to a Largemouth with the exception of 3 small teeth located on the tongue. Also the dont get as big as a largemouth, 2-3 pounds.
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I thought so. Now that I go back and look at my pictures from that day at the river, noticed I had a pic of a different fish that I more than likely presumed to be a rock bass. So this must be a kentucky bass/red eye bass then?
that would be a smallmouth bass
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
That buffalo musta been fun on a fly rod.

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It was! I have hooked bigger ones that stripped more line, but it put a good flex in the rod.
 
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