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heat yourself up some vegetable oil and fry up any small chunks of meat that might have gone to waste or any trim pieces...when the meat is fried to your preference enjoy the small chunks with any favorite condiment or sauce and a beverage of your choice...It's called "chiclic"...mostly a South Dakota thing but I read about in field and stream...just another great way to enjoy butchering with your buddies or even alone.

something new to try if you wish.
 

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Since this is "Tribute to Shadowlurker" week-;)

In a way, I was glad he harvested his 1st deer just a few months before he died-looks like the deer gods wanted him to tag along.
 

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Its very hard to believe he was at a Public Hunting area during muzzleloader season that he had been to numerous times bowhunting and squirrel hunting and was not wearing orange and did not ? have a muzzleloader with him. He was working on a PHD, he was no dummy. I remember the short video where a deputy sheriff was detaining an amish youth hunter. When the final investigation was complete somebody older, seemed to be the shooter?
 

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Its very hard to believe he was at a Public Hunting area during muzzleloader season that he had been to numerous times bowhunting and squirrel hunting and was not wearing orange and did not ? have a muzzleloader with him. He was working on a PHD, he was no dummy. I remember the short video where a deputy sheriff was detaining an amish youth hunter. When the final investigation was complete somebody older, seemed to be the shooter?
As much as we dig, I don't think we'll ever know the exact situation:(

Outdoors: With one careless shot, a life is lost

By Dave Golowenski
For The Columbus Dispatch
Sunday January 22, 2012 6:37 AM

Tragic hunting cases point to a need for vigilance-

That on occasion hunters and nonhunters die at the hands of hunters is not reported in timely news releases by the Ohio Division of Wildlife. The explanation for that is not entirely clear, though it's likely decision-makers have never thought of a compelling reason to do so and found a number of reasons, including sensitivity to victims' families.

Vicki Ervin, the division's communications manager, said she can't remember hunting incidents ever being routinely reported. The division issues an annual report, though the 2010 report is not yet complete.

Stories about busted poaching rings still make the wildlife reports, no doubt as cautionary tales aimed at would-be scofflaws, as well as demonstrations that the public's license and permit money gets results.

Not reported by the division was the untimely death of Nikolas J. Neric, 26, of suburban Cleveland. Neric, who lived in the suburb of Brooklyn, died from a gunshot wound at the Grand River Wildlife Area in Trumbull County on the afternoon of Jan. 10, the final day of the four-day deer muzzleloader season.

Here is what a friend posted last week about Neric on a Web page provided by the funeral home:

"I believe that there are many people you meet during your lifetime that influence and change who you are as a person. Nick was one of those people. … I would marvel at how one minute Nick could be the funniest person in the world and then the next minute he would be the most caring and concerned person. … Nick showed how to be individualistic and true to yourself, how to strive for the very best in whatever you did and how to be able to laugh at any situation. I was proud to have known Nick and to have called him my friend."

The Trumbull County coroner decided against bringing charges, calling the death an accident.
 

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Wow, I can't believe I'm reading this. I always enjoyed reading Shadow's posts. I remember when he went out west somewhere and was shooting squirrels, then another time he shot a crow and decided to eat it. That guy was funny. He will be missed.
 

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There always seems to be so much hesitation by the state to make public what happened. I understand the somewhat precarious state of the non-hunting public's perception of hunting and the state not wanting to publicize the negative aspect of hunting. But in my mind, keeping it all hush hush is passing up opportunity to educate what can happen if you are careless. I think these kind of accidents need to be blasted all over hunting web sites and hunter education courses and whatever it takes to get into the minds of hunters. We are all human and are vulnerable to make mistakes. Only through constant reminders are we able to stay vigilant so this does not happen. It should not happen ever. A perfect opportunity to teach is being passed up in the name of not tarnishing the public perception of hunting. That is a tragedy. Just some of my thoughts on this horrible subject. RIP Shadowlurker.
 

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I agree, it is a terrible shame if they are indeed keeping it hush-hush so as not to tarnish the perception of hunters. Those who oppose hunting will never understand the heart of a hunter anyway. I feel like they owe an explanation, not to the general public but to those who share the passion that Shadowlurker possessed.
It is a terrible shame, whatever happened. At the same time, it serves as a stark reminder of the terrible consequences just one moment of carelessness can cause. I'm not referring to any carelessness on the part of Shadowlurker, but the one who pulled the trigger. I cannot imagine the pain.

RIP, Shadowlurker. You are missed.
 

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I agree, it is a terrible shame if they are indeed keeping it hush-hush so as not to tarnish the perception of hunters. Those who oppose hunting will never understand the heart of a hunter anyway. I feel like they owe an explanation, not to the general public but to those who share the passion that Shadowlurker possessed.
It is a terrible shame, whatever happened. At the same time, it serves as a stark reminder of the terrible consequences just one moment of carelessness can cause. I'm not referring to any carelessness on the part of Shadowlurker, but the one who pulled the trigger. I cannot imagine the pain.

RIP, Shadowlurker. You are missed.
Yes he is........Harvested his 1st deer at Grand River and then lost his life there....sad.....

Makes you value life just a little bit more. Going to stick this thread as well as a tribute to him.

Outdoors: With one careless shot, a life is lost

By Dave Golowenski
For The Columbus Dispatch
Sunday January 22, 2012 6:37 AM

Tragic hunting cases point to a need for vigilance-

That on occasion hunters and nonhunters die at the hands of hunters is not reported in timely news releases by the Ohio Division of Wildlife. The explanation for that is not entirely clear, though it's likely decision-makers have never thought of a compelling reason to do so and found a number of reasons, including sensitivity to victims' families.

Vicki Ervin, the division's communications manager, said she can't remember hunting incidents ever being routinely reported. The division issues an annual report, though the 2010 report is not yet complete.

Stories about busted poaching rings still make the wildlife reports, no doubt as cautionary tales aimed at would-be scofflaws, as well as demonstrations that the public's license and permit money gets results.

Not reported by the division was the untimely death of Nikolas J. Neric, 26, of suburban Cleveland. Neric, who lived in the suburb of Brooklyn, died from a gunshot wound at the Grand River Wildlife Area in Trumbull County on the afternoon of Jan. 10, the final day of the four-day deer muzzleloader season.

Here is what a friend posted last week about Neric on a Web page provided by the funeral home:

"I believe that there are many people you meet during your lifetime that influence and change who you are as a person. Nick was one of those people. … I would marvel at how one minute Nick could be the funniest person in the world and then the next minute he would be the most caring and concerned person. … Nick showed how to be individualistic and true to yourself, how to strive for the very best in whatever you did and how to be able to laugh at any situation. I was proud to have known Nick and to have called him my friend."

The Trumbull County coroner decided against bringing charges, calling the death an accident.
 

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One thing I've thought about this week after reading these threads is a talk my wife and I had last year. After the guy lost his life last year by being shot in his stand and the shooter leaving and then writing the letter to the P.D. we were talking about it. The point I made to her is people die in numerous ways all the time. If I die while hunting I can't really think of any better way to go. It's something I've loved to do my entire life and I can't think of a better place I'd rather be when I die. Shadowlurker was young and it doesn't make it any less of a shame that he's gone but there is a tiny bit of consolation knowing that he was in a place he loved to be.
 

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Wow just found this. Very very sad. I truly question hunting public land during any firearms Seasons. Cold chills as I think how easily this could have been me instead. RIP.

People just aren't careful enough is the bottom line. All many people think when a deer runs between someone else is if I don't shoot they might get the deer. That and the 5 and 6 shot burst you hear. This thread will change when and how I hunt going forward.
 

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Geez --- I take a few month break and come back to find this. What an absolute bummer - the old saying goes, the good die young.

RIP Friend
I just read this thread. My emotions went from such happiness for the op to extreme sadness. Such a tragedy. Everyone enjoy your time on this earth and be thankful everyday. It's a very short time we all have make the very best of it each day. It could end in a minute.
 
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