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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was a HOT day today, but we had some interesting results- trying to find the right metal for our back stops.

The 1st one is 1/4 steel plate shot with a 30-06 and .223 (Armor piercing)



This one was 1/2 steel plate shot with the same above- you think it may be good enough:mischeif:;):biggrin:



This is the metal that protects our High Power rifle posts shot with normal 30-06-which we are not happy about:whistle:

 

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You really need AR(abrasion resistant) plate for target. I was shooting with a buddy a few years ago and he had a brand new steel target. He shot it some with his .22 then tried a .223. Punched 3 perfect holes in it. :bouncy:
 

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sand bank

Need to make a small pit about a foot deep x 2 ft square. Fill with sand. Set the 1/2 plate at a 15-20 degree angle deflecting bullets down into the sand. Bullets don't penetrate if they ricochet. Not a bad set-up for 50 yds and over.
 

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Need to make a small pit about a foot deep x 2 ft square. Fill with sand. Set the 1/2 plate at a 15-20 degree angle deflecting bullets down into the sand. Bullets don't penetrate if they ricochet. Not a bad set-up for 50 yds and over.
You have the right idea. The bullets hitting a straight on target is more the issue. If you look at some of the new range back stops in this picture that we installed the past 2 years, they are set up to keep the projectiles within the confines of those structures. We have them at a specific angle down to the ground and then into a "pit" of sand and dirt. Works very well and keeps the bullets coinfined and in a protected area, where they don't damage the environment(Trees and Land). Safety is also our #1 priority.

The two large backstops in the back were installed this year. There are two more large ones to the left of this picture that you cannot see here.

The steel, welding and labor to install all of this is very costly. The labor and design were strictly done by members only. We have a design guru who is 79 years old that spear heads most of this. Smart and hard working and we don't know what we would do without him. He literally is there just about every day in the summer.



The issue comes about in some of our smaller sight in ranges, and the back of the bunkers we have made- you will notice bullet holes in the 2nd picture in the back of this bunker. It's only 1.5 years old, and that 1/4 hardened steel may not be enough. We tested the 1/2 hardened steel and it seems to hold up better. Steel sheets and plates comes in many forms and "grades" and we try to use the best hardened grade steel we can buy. It's just scary that the vertical posts that I posted above and the steel we used to protect them-even at an angle- took the bullet and allowed it to go completely thru.



 

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John is the steel protecting the uprights AR plate? It's the standard for silhouette targets and will hold up to rifle fire. However silhouettes can move, your uprights are ridged.

Something similar. The target carriers at Camp Perry have verticle wood 2x4s. A number of years ago someone in the pits was hurt when a bullet hit the wood. So they did lots of experimenting and decided fir with no knots. Very expensive lumber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
John is the steel protecting the uprights AR plate? It's the standard for silhouette targets and will hold up to rifle fire. However silhouettes can move, your uprights are ridged.

Something similar. The target carriers at Camp Perry have verticle wood 2x4s. A number of years ago someone in the pits was hurt when a bullet hit the wood. So they did lots of experimenting and decided fir with no knots. Very expensive lumber.
I'm not sure- I'll ask Don when I see him next week.
 

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Just want to throw this one out there. Couple of decades ago a shooting friend of mine had some 1/2 inch armor plate from a half track. He also had some black tip AP ammo in .30-06, GI grade.

The bet was that the AP ammo would not go through the armor plate at 25 yards. I was taught at weapons school that AP rounds were designed to go through their own diameter of armor. .30 cal is less than 1/2 inch.

We put the plate on a dirt mound with a bit of an angle to the bore of the rifle, a Smith-Corona 1903A3. Three shots later from the A3 revealed the plate still being smooth as glass.

Next we set the plate to be exactly perpendicular to the bore of the A3. 4 shots later we inspected the plate. Shot # 1 had the penetrater sticking in the plate. Shot # 2 also had the penetrater sticking in the plate. Shot # 3 had the penetrater stuck but sticking through the plate. Shot # 4 penetrated clean through the plate. We were surprised to say the least. All of the shots were about 1/2 inch apart. All we could figure out as to why the plate failed is that the close impact (group, not shooting distance) of the shots caused the armor to lose its tensile strength.

So I guess where I am going with this is that hits on mild steel by HP rifle rounds is going to be ugly even on up to 1/2 inch mild steel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good info Fred- those vertical metal angled posts on the high power range had 33 "hits" since last fall on them, and several holes had us questioning the steel and what other options we need to look at. Those rounds were basic .30 caliber and whatever is legal that our members shoot, as well as the organized events that are held there on the high power range.

We don't allow 50 caliber or auto weapons on the range for safety reasons.
 
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