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OK I know it is hard to describe my land to someone who hasn't seen it but I am going to do my best because I need advice. Basically I hunt a rectangular plot of land that runs deep north and south. about 3/4 of the land is grass fields bisected by hedgerows that run East and West and it lays between two farmers fields. In the back it is wooded. The woods start at the edge of the field and go back about 20 yards. Then after that it is sort of a mix of little grass open areas, brush, briars, and trees for about 70 yards. Then it starts to be wooded again. The property that I can hunt ends right after the briars end, so I usually sit right on the edge of the woods where the other property starts. The West and East sides of the property do not have the brushy area, more like wooded corridors all the way back and on the west side a little creek runs through diagonally. I heard 4 gobbles back in the property that I can't hunt tuesday morning. They were vocal until they flew down. Then one ended up gobbling right behind me in the brush but I couldn't see him. What I am trying to figure out is where to set up. I don't know if I should try and set up by the beginning of the wooded area or maybe back into the brush a little or find a little opening. I have heard you don't want to be in an area where I tom can see the decoys from 100 yards away, so in the wooded area he could definitely see them because this land is super flat, but I have also read and heard they cruise around in the woods a lot. Also I was out there thursday and we didn't hear a peep...but we did get out a little late. Any help would be excellent!
 

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My suggestions are to face the properties you know the birds are on. If possible, put yourself right at the property line, with the farthest shot you would take being the property line itself. Setting up on a field isn't a terrible idea, just be aware of what you want. A jake decoy will fire up a mature bird and cause him to close the distance just about no matter what. If your entertaining the idea of shooting a jake, a closer in setup with a lone hen deke may serve you better.

You're property sounds prime. I prefer a nice grassy field to sit on myself. Plenty of seeds and insects for the hens to munch on, and if its short enough, it is ideal for strutting toms. Birds LOVE edges, and you have plenty of them. The mixed area toward the back also sound good, I would definitely set up there if your birds are toward the back. Get as close to them as you can.

The most important element of a successful turkey hunt (after safety) is having turkeys. Know where they are at by roosting, scouting, and recording your hunt logs. Learn their patterns. Believe it or not, they don't change their patterns that much, even year to year or with moderate hunting pressure. If you hear a bird on the roost, chances are excellent he'll go to bed within 100 yards the next night. I hunted a bird for 4 weeks straight last year and every morning he was within 60 yards of his original roosting tree. I shot him not 100 yards from it the Friday before closer, after the one morning he woke up 1/2 mile away. He had roosted elsewhere, but he still patterned back to where he was before and gobbled all the way to me. Doing your homework pays off sometimes! Good luck!
 
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