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Regular rifles would have no negative affect just like they have no ill affect everywhere else they are used. Given our current bag limits. We have just been so deprived all our lives we will kiss the hand “allowing us” the use of straight wall lobbers. That’s my only change. They are doing it in IN eventually it’s coming here too. Can’t wait. A young person could easily use a .243 or 30.30 as well.
 

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This forum needs more threads like this one.
I’ve been here 19years this is nothing. Should have been here in the old days. Lots of fun back then. 19 years tomorrow actually it appears.
 

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you can alway hunt with a spear or longbow. Maybe falconry
I don't think a spear is legal in Ohio, even when they had a "primitive weapon season" instead of a "muzzleloader season".

Back in the late 70s, I was TDY to WPAFB Fairborn OH.

A guy with a muzzleloader (traditional) sitting with his back to a tree. A buck approached & he froze so he wouldn't sppok it. It seems he used doe urine tomask his scent. It was successful, the buck walked up to him & was very interested in finding the doe.

The hunter lost his nerve, smashed the buck on the skull with the rifle barrel, and dispatched it with his knife. Back then deer had to be presented at a check station, and the ranger noted the lack of a bullet hole. When asked the hunter related the story & he was presented with a poaching violation for using a weapon not on the list for the season.

He went to court, argued a club is a primitive weapon, response was it isn't on the allowed list. He said a muzzleloader was on the list, response but it was used in the manner of a club. However, the judge took pity on him. No violation on his record, no loss of privileges, though the deer had been confiscated & was long gone.
 

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Summary

Crossbows are bad but compounds are ok. So long as you don't hunt to much before gun season.

Inline muzzleloaders are compared to single shots. Wtf.

And we want rifles now. The 350 legend and all the other new weapons allowed during gun seasons are plenty enough to harvest a deer.

We also need more young hunters. The best way to do so is giving them easier to use weapons. Crossbows ,350 legend rifles and inline muzzleloaders.

But we don't want to share the outdoors or our deer heard. Smh. The best way to get kids away from the electronics is to get them outside. Teach them to hunt and fish. Just don't be mad when they out fish you or kill that big buck you have night pics of but they did the scouting to find his bedroom. We have some great young or just new older hunters. I'm in a very heavily hunted area and believe me it's hard to hunt but that's what makes it fun. If I could just sit on a bucket and shoot a big buck with a gun it wouldn't be fun. I want to scout. Find new areas. Hang new stands. Plant food plots. Figure out new over looked food sources. Understand travel patterns. This is hunting. The method of kill is just that. A weapon. To me it doesn't matter how you do it. Just get out there and enjoy it. And get some youth hunters involved while you're at it. Could be a niece or nephew. The neighbors kids. Kid from church or work. Anyone.

Bottom line is we should be proud of the great state of Ohio and what we have to use as resources. And be happy when you see a kid with a crossbow and a tree stand out trying to get a deer. For them it's still the thrill of the chase not just killing a big buck.
Fine - give them inline muzzleloaders. During the regular gun season.

I have 50 acres of mostly wooded land, I'd prefer to use my 30-06. I have owned for decades, reloaded for it for decades. However I had to buy another rifle to use on my land for deer.

BTW - why is there no straight-wall restriction for other game? I can shoot groundhogs, squirrel, rabblts, damn near every other game with my 30-06 but not deer! Where's the logic in that?
 

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Toker and Wascher are on to something here. You can't tell me it is safe to shoot a coyote at night with any rifle and then tell me it is unsafe to shoot the same rifle during the day because the target is a deer. I grew up in KY and have been shooting deer with a .270 since I was 10 or 11. Indiana has adopted modern rifles. There is no reported human carnage from using modern rifles. On my land this season, we had 2 wounded deer not recovered with shotgun slugs. These deer will not be reported as harvested and I hope they survive. I know deer can still be shot and not recovered with a modern rifle but I guarantee that rate is much lower. Also, the kill is more humane. It is long past time to approve modern rifles.
 

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In line muzzle loaders are still limited to one shot and no cartridge . They are loaded the exact same way as a Hawken; powder then projectile. To whine about them is simply looking for something to whine about. Which isn’t that uncommon on here.
Can’t support limiting in line muzzleloaders. Their inclusion harms nothing.
 

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Long past time to approve modern rifles. There is no logical argument against it. Every article you read about the 350 legend will have a caveat by the writer explaining to free America why it has to exist. Usually sounds something like this, because some states DNR’s use draconian regulations and restrict hunters to straight wall cartridge rifles. People in other states are astounded by this. We should be too. Kansas is flat as a pancake they use real rifles. Urban zones public land whatever you wanna do. Private ground, real rifles. 9 days of the year not asking for much change here.
 

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Inlines are subject to hangfires, wet powder, no ignition, and all other issues with a traditional muzzleloader.
You have a lot more issues with a traditional muzzleloader.

If the humidly is too high I need to put a new priming charge in my flintlock's pan and hope the main charge isn't affected.

Consistency of load, pressure on seating the load, proper patch & lube, orientation of the sprue when you start the ball keeping everything dry (especially with a flintlock) - all affect function, accuracy & precision. All skills physical & mental for any hunter to have.

Why are inline users having issues? A journeyman or master doesn't blame his tools, only apprentices.
 

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Why would anyone choose to take a shot at an animal with an inferior weapon? I shoot an in-line ( 50 cal Encore) because I want to do all in my power to make an accurate, killing shot. In-line muzzle loaders are inherently more accurate than a flinter with a patched round ball. Accurate shots mean no wounded deer. If Ohio had a flintlock season I’d probably buy one, knowing its limitations. But for now I’ll shoot my in-line with triple 7 and a 250gr shockwave
 

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Long past time to approve modern rifles. There is no logical argument against it. Every article you read about the 350 legend will have a caveat by the writer explaining to free America why it has to exist. Usually sounds something like this, because some states DNR’s use draconian regulations and restrict hunters to straight wall cartridge rifles. People in other states are astounded by this. We should be too. Kansas is flat as a pancake they use real rifles. Urban zones public land whatever you wanna do. Private ground, real rifles. 9 days of the year not asking for much change here.
There are a few things to remember. First is insurance this state is run by insurance companies and laws and regulations are crafted around it. So, I wouldn't be surprised if this had something to do with. ODNR has some of the worst rules and constantly hide behind ambiguity when it comes to drafting any regulation. I am sure most of us are breaking a rule or two every time we go out hunting and not even knowing we are.

I have met a few hunter on private land who today, will hunt on their land for deer with a .308. They just don't care cause it's private land. The rules for public and private land ODNR try to keep the same but it comes down to enforcement, what they can and what they want to enforce.
 

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Why would anyone choose to take a shot at an animal with an inferior weapon? I shoot an in-line ( 50 cal Encore) because I want to do all in my power to make an accurate, killing shot. In-line muzzle loaders are inherently more accurate than a flinter with a patched round ball. Accurate shots mean no wounded deer. If Ohio had a flintlock season I’d probably buy one, knowing its limitations. But for now I’ll shoot my in-line with triple 7 and a 250gr shockwave
An inline muzzleloader is inferior to a breechloader. Oh, and when you get that breechloader how could you possibly hunt using inferior ammunition? My Weatherby 30.06 is guarantied to shoot sub-MOA groups (under 1 inch at 100 yards), mine came in closer to 0.75 inch on the factory test. With handloads, refined over decades, I can get 0.5 inches.

So by your logic you should scrap that inline, buy a proper breechloading rifle, get reloding gear & supplies, and optimize your ammo. So why would you be advocating an inline? Or have you just decided what you want and are spouting whatever you think might support your cause?


A traditional muzzleloader doesn't provide instant gratification. It requires attention to detail, skill, and practice. Real hunters won't go out that far to assure that they have sufficient energy. They know they're limitations & that of their equipment.. I won't sh0ot much over a hundred yards in a field situation, even with my 30.06, depending on the situation..The weapon isn't the limiting factor, the limiting factor is the shooter.

Long range shootings competitions for muzzleloaders are at ranges from 500 to 1000 yards. I've seen shooters at an NMLR competition at Friendship Indiana hitting 12 inch targets with open sights at those ranges. Can you do that with your inline? Why don't you post a video.to show us how superior your inline is?
 

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As a relatively new hunter. I did go out for both rifle and bow so far this season. From my perspective, I find it a bit hard to believe the explosion of crossbow hunters has had an impact on rifle season. From my own experience, you can own one of the most advance and expensive crossbows out there, but it doesn't mean you are going to get a deer. Sure, it is a lot easier, I wont pretend that it is not. But, even with a crossbow people still miss. There are other factors that an expensive toy cannot take away, when out in the field. I have been out over a dozen times this year deer hunting, had a good shot on one decent doe and missed. But, wind, scent, sound, pressure, and hunters hunting other game on public lands still makes this difficult. Some of this get's better with experience.

What I am saying, just cause anyone can go buy a crossbow, even a ridiculous one (trust me y'all gave me **** about it) getting a deer isn't guaranteed and doesn't seem any easier. Because it is only taking one thing out of your control, there are plenty of other things in your control you need to mitigate and then deal with what isn't in your control.
What your missing is the amount of people that are now hunting during "Bow" season has now doubled (maybe tripled) because of the use of crossbows. More people, more opportunity, more dead deer. (Most successful hunters only harvest one deer per year, per ODNR). By the time gun season rolls around, you have less deer, more educated deer, and less hunters (Compared to years past.) The "Orange army" now wears camo. I have hunted deer in Ohio for over 40 years. We had more hunters, less deer and for most of us, if you hunted deer, it was during gun week.
 

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What your missing is the amount of people that are now hunting during "Bow" season has now doubled (maybe tripled) because of the use of crossbows. More people, more opportunity, more dead deer. (Most successful hunters only harvest one deer per year, per ODNR). By the time gun season rolls around, you have less deer, more educated deer, and less hunters (Compared to years past.) The "Orange army" now wears camo. I have hunted deer in Ohio for over 40 years. We had more hunters, less deer and for most of us, if you hunted deer, it was during gun week.
Good point, though I suspect the crossbow hunters are mostly new & inexperienced hunters and are not successful.

That said, I Iooked through the ODNR deer harvest report and that is not data that they report, nor do they provide data from which this can be inferred.

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Every statement you say is incorrect. More deer are killed by crossbow hunters than vertical archers in Ohio.
 

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Good point, though I suspect the crossbow hunters are mostly new & inexperienced hunters and are not successful.

That said, I Iooked through the ODNR deer harvest report and that is not data that they report, nor do they provide data from which this can be inferred.

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Or... are the "New" crossbow hunters the guys (and gals) that used to only gun hunt?
 

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