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Groundhog anyone?

Discussion in 'Wild Game Recipes' started by S.Larger, Sep 5, 2012.

  1. Does anyone here eat the groundhogs they shoot?

    The reason I ask is they seem to have plenty meat and would like to know if eating them is common practice versus using them as dog food, coyote bait, or ditch fertilizer.
     
  2. young-un's are excellent to eat. i like to clean & brine; just like a turkey or chicken. fry till ya get a good brown on the outside. put it in a crock pot, or dutch oven with veg. of your chose-in. cook it slow with mushroom soup to cover. crock-pot on low 6-8 hrs,,oven at 250 for 4-5..:bouncy: taste's just like :chicken:
     

  3. Thanks, do you think they would make a good smoked meat or jerky?
     
  4. Need to bump this one up. Make sure you remove the scent glands. You'll find them around the top of the groundhog's front legs and the lower back. They are little white glands that look like grains of rice.

    I use only Campbell's french onion soup as the source of liquid in a crock pot instead of water, and the brand does make a difference, then toss in chopped garlic, chopped carrots, chopped celery if you want, and potatoes same volume as you would prefer for a roast or stew.

    Or use 1 celery stalk, 2 garlic cloves, 6 to 8 carrots, and 4 to 6 potatoes.

    Slow cook about 4 hours for a young one. Older ones get about 6 hrs.

    Times depend on your style crock pot, cook until the meat "falls off the bone".

    For gravy style stew: Mix 1/4 to 1/2 a cup of cool water with 1 tbs. flour. Mix until the flour blends without lumps. Add to the finished stew to thicken the broth.

    This is an old family recipe. I'm 62 and I used to make this a s a Mother's day dinner every year since I was 12. Mom passed at 83 and looked forward to the tradition every year.

    For those that do not know how, pre-prep the day of the hunt prior to freezing or using fresh:


    Cut off the head, tail, and feet. Skin and remove the insides. Make sure you remove the scent glands. You'll find them around the top of the groundhog's front legs and the lower back, in the small of it.


    Rinse the inside of the groundhog thoroughly with water and then the outside.


    Cut the groundhog into sections. You decide how many.


    Fill a pot with enough cold water to cover the animal, usually two quarts. Add about a1/4 cup vinegar and 1 to 1½ tbs. sea salt or no iodized salt. Place the groundhog in the vinegar and salt brine and cover. Leave it in the pot in a fridge for 8 to 12 hours. This draws the gammy taste out of any wild game.



    Pour off brine, thoroughly rinse, and pat dry. Then either freeze or cook it.


    Quick cook method:

    Boil the groundhog in 2 quarts of water for 20 minutes. If foamy water rises to the top, skim it away. Afterwards slice into 1 to 1½ inch pieces.

    Then back into a pot or skillet.

    Add 1 celery stalk, 2 garlic cloves, 6 to 8 carrots, and 4 to 6 potatoes. Add enough water to just cover the meat. Lower the heat and simmer for 45 minutes or until fork tender.

    For gravy style stew: Mix 1/4 to 1/2 a cup of cool water with 1 tbs. flour. Mix until the flour blends without lumps. Add to the finished stew to thicken the broth.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2015
  5. Nimrod

    Nimrod Staff Member Super Mod Mod

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    I agree about the little ones! I find the older 'hogs greasy and a strong game taste.
     
  6. Yep, same as all game or fish, the older ones don't taste as good.
     
  7. Thanks for the info! :biggrin:
     

  8. I don't see why they would not. That is the slowest slow cooking there is.

    I'll have to try that next spring. Thanks for the idea.