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Discussion Starter · #1,102 · (Edited)
Add another new state with CWD infestation-----


Chronic Wasting Disease detected in two Idaho mule deer

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 3:47 PM MST
These are the first confirmed positive tests for
Chronic Wasting Disease in Idaho

Two mule deer bucks harvested during October in the Slate Creek drainage near Lucile in Idaho County tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease, according to Idaho Fish and Game. Under Fish and Game’s CWD strategic plan, both hunters have been notified that their bucks tested positive.

Although CWD has been known to exist in the Western United States for over 40 years, this is the first time animals in Idaho have tested positive for the disease, which is fatal to deer, elk, moose and caribou. The Idaho Fish and Game Commission has been notified, as well as the Idaho Department of Agriculture, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Samples from the diseased mule deer were tested at the Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Lab and are being verified by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa.

Anyone hunting in Unit 14 is encouraged to have any harvested deer or elk tested. To sample for CWD, lymph node tissue from fresh or frozen harvested heads are extracted. Meat or muscle tissue cannot be used to test for CWD.

Fish and Game will continue to supply more information as it becomes available. Visit idfg.idaho.gov/cwd for more information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,103 ·
Kentucky is pro-active in their state even though they do not have any positive cwd cases. They are implementing restrictions in 5 areas that are adjacent to KY to get ahead of the curve.


The always-fatal neurological disease that affects deer, elk, moose and caribou has not been detected in Kentucky. However, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife's response plan calls for implementation of specific measures following a positive detection within 30 miles of Kentucky's border. This is because deer are highly mobile, and can range up to several miles in a single day.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife activated its response plan Wednesday, Sept. 8 after the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency announced confirmation of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in a 3 ½-year-old female deer collected in Henry County, Tennessee, which is southwest of Murray, Kentucky and approximately 8 miles from the Kentucky-Tennessee border. The deer was thin and exhibiting strange behavior. Multiple tests confirmed the presence of CWD in the deer.

Link:
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,108 ·
Is this an increase or a decrease from the past?
If you look at the bottom of each pic, it shows what was reported in 2020, and what was reported in 2021. Looks like 5 more we reported in 2021 as of 1/6/22.

Link-

 
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If you look at the bottom of each pic, it shows what was reported in 2020, and what was reported in 2021. Looks like 5 more we reported in 2021 as of 1/6/22.

Link-

Got it. Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #1,110 ·
Looks like we are up to 10 total positive found cases now, with a couple a fairly good distance from the main infected area. See link to map below under the second drop down. Legend at bottom indicates year and some location information.



North Carolina now has their 1st case as well-

 
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Discussion Starter · #1,113 ·
Ohio- In March, 177 Deer were culled by the ODNR in the disease area and sent out for testing. Sharp shooters using suppressors over 4 nights harvested the deer .

In PA- Another Captive facility tests positive.

NEWLY DETECTED CWD-POSITIVES LEAD TO NEW DMA, EXPANSIONS

04/11/2022

HARRISBURG, PA - The Pennsylvania Game Commission today announced the creation of a new Chronic Wasting Disease Management Area (DMA) and the expansion of two existing DMAs.

The new DMA 7 was created when CWD recently was detected at a captive facility in Lycoming County. The newly established DMA includes portions of Lycoming, Northumberland, Montour, Columbia and Sullivan counties, and will be about 460 square miles in size. This DMA represents the fifth DMA to be created due to a captive facility. The new boundary can be found at https://arcg.is/1G4TLrOpens In A New Window.

DMA 4 also will expand following detection of CWD at a captive facility in southern Lancaster County. DMA 4’s expansion will follow the Susquehanna River south to the Maryland border and follow the Octoraro Creek north to where it meets the current boundary.

DMA 4 is located in southeastern Pennsylvania and includes portions of Berks, Lancaster, and Lebanon counties. This is the third captive facility at which CWD was detected in DMA 4. CWD has not been detected among free-ranging deer in DMA 4. The new boundary can be found at https://arcg.is/1G4TLrOpens In A New Window.

DMA 2 is expanding in two locations as a result of CWD detections in wild and captive deer. In the northeast corner of the DMA, a road-killed adult female deer was found on the current boundary, prompting expansion north along the West Branch Susquehanna River to Lewisburg and continuing west on Route 45 to meet the current boundary.
The northcentral boundary of DMA 2 is changing due to a CWD detection at a captive facility and in a road-killed adult male deer. The DMA 2 boundary will expand north to Interstate 99/Route 322 to include the Rothrock State Forest and State College areas.

DMA 2 is a geographically large DMA that stretches far from east to west. In early 2021, it was expanded to include all or parts of Adams, Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Centre, Clearfield, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Indiana, Juniata, Mifflin, Northumberland, Perry, Snyder, Somerset, Union, and Westmoreland counties. Exact boundaries can be found at https://arcg.is/1G4TLrOpens In A New Window.

The Game Commission conducts road-killed deer surveillance year-round so there is potential for the boundaries to change prior to the hunting seasons. Be sure to check online for the most up-to-date boundaries.
Within all DMAs and the CWD Established Area (EA), it is unlawful to:
  • Remove or export any deer or elk high-risk parts (e.g., head, spinal column and spleen) from a DMA or EA
  • Use or possess deer or elk urine-based attractants
  • Directly or indirectly feed wild, free-ranging deer. It is already illegal to feed elk regardless of DMA location
  • Rehabilitate wild, free-ranging deer or elk
Hunters are asked to provide samples for CWD testing. The Game Commission offers free CWD testing within the DMAs. Locations of head-collection containers will be announced prior to the hunting seasons.
Although CWD has not been documented in humans, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends not eating the meat of a CWD-positive deer.

Contact the Game Commission’s CWD Hotline at 1-833-INFOCWD, email [email protected] or visit https://arcg.is/1G4TLrOpens In A New Window to ask questions or for more information.
MEDIA CONTACT: Travis Lau - 717-705-6541
 

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Hmm...discovering CWD in yet another captive cervid operation. What are the odds?

One would think after years of allocations, announcements, appropriations, bureaucracies, data, grants, research, resources, revelations, reviews, rules, and studies, that someone, somewhere, at some point in time, would suggest a common factor in the spread of the disease and the involved industry, and that someone, somewhere, at some point in time, would "pull the plug" on that industry.

Thanks again, 56, for keeping us informed.
 

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Ohio- In March, 177 Deer were culled by the ODNR in the disease area and sent out for testing. Sharp shooters using suppressors over 4 nights harvested the deer .

In PA- Another Captive facility tests positive.

NEWLY DETECTED CWD-POSITIVES LEAD TO NEW DMA, EXPANSIONS

04/11/2022

HARRISBURG, PA - The Pennsylvania Game Commission today announced the creation of a new Chronic Wasting Disease Management Area (DMA) and the expansion of two existing DMAs.

The new DMA 7 was created when CWD recently was detected at a captive facility in Lycoming County. The newly established DMA includes portions of Lycoming, Northumberland, Montour, Columbia and Sullivan counties, and will be about 460 square miles in size. This DMA represents the fifth DMA to be created due to a captive facility. The new boundary can be found at https://arcg.is/1G4TLrOpens In A New Window.

DMA 4 also will expand following detection of CWD at a captive facility in southern Lancaster County. DMA 4’s expansion will follow the Susquehanna River south to the Maryland border and follow the Octoraro Creek north to where it meets the current boundary.

DMA 4 is located in southeastern Pennsylvania and includes portions of Berks, Lancaster, and Lebanon counties. This is the third captive facility at which CWD was detected in DMA 4. CWD has not been detected among free-ranging deer in DMA 4. The new boundary can be found at https://arcg.is/1G4TLrOpens In A New Window.

DMA 2 is expanding in two locations as a result of CWD detections in wild and captive deer. In the northeast corner of the DMA, a road-killed adult female deer was found on the current boundary, prompting expansion north along the West Branch Susquehanna River to Lewisburg and continuing west on Route 45 to meet the current boundary.
The northcentral boundary of DMA 2 is changing due to a CWD detection at a captive facility and in a road-killed adult male deer. The DMA 2 boundary will expand north to Interstate 99/Route 322 to include the Rothrock State Forest and State College areas.

DMA 2 is a geographically large DMA that stretches far from east to west. In early 2021, it was expanded to include all or parts of Adams, Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Centre, Clearfield, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Indiana, Juniata, Mifflin, Northumberland, Perry, Snyder, Somerset, Union, and Westmoreland counties. Exact boundaries can be found at https://arcg.is/1G4TLrOpens In A New Window.

The Game Commission conducts road-killed deer surveillance year-round so there is potential for the boundaries to change prior to the hunting seasons. Be sure to check online for the most up-to-date boundaries.
Within all DMAs and the CWD Established Area (EA), it is unlawful to:
  • Remove or export any deer or elk high-risk parts (e.g., head, spinal column and spleen) from a DMA or EA
  • Use or possess deer or elk urine-based attractants
  • Directly or indirectly feed wild, free-ranging deer. It is already illegal to feed elk regardless of DMA location
  • Rehabilitate wild, free-ranging deer or elk
Hunters are asked to provide samples for CWD testing. The Game Commission offers free CWD testing within the DMAs. Locations of head-collection containers will be announced prior to the hunting seasons.
Although CWD has not been documented in humans, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends not eating the meat of a CWD-positive deer.

Contact the Game Commission’s CWD Hotline at 1-833-INFOCWD, email [email protected] or visit https://arcg.is/1G4TLrOpens In A New Window to ask questions or for more information.
MEDIA CONTACT: Travis Lau - 717-705-6541
Thank you for keeping us updated!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #1,116 ·
Most results are in from the culling mentioned above- at least one more positive with a few more to come in yet.

CWD control efforts produce one positive from culling
April 20, 2022
Jane Beathard
4 25 Jane Cwd


Clint McCoy, an ODNR Division of Wildlife deer biologist, discusses CWD with residents of Marion and Wyandot counties during a public meeting. CWD has been found in deer in Wyandot County.

The numbers are almost all in and it doesn’t look good for either the deer or those who advocated for culling of the whitetails in Marion and Wyandot counties in order to hinder the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD).

As of April 15, only one of the 180 or so whitetails taken by sharpshooters during a four-night purge in March has tested positive for the deadly disease. Three tests were still pending and the Ohio Division of Wildlife was waiting for final confirmation on the one positive from a federal lab.

The situation adds fuel to the argument some Marion County farmers and outdoorsmen have made against culling, quarantines, baiting bans, increased harvests and similar measures, saying they have had no effect on the spread of the disease and have cost taxpayers $100,000,000 nationwide.

They also fear deer populations will dwindle and there will be no animals left for their families to watch and enjoy.

Their opinions are based on a study by the American Cervid Alliance that essentially said all measures taken by states to curb CWD have been useless.

Robert Fragale and Todd Sims, both of Marion County, have taken the argument against culling and other control measures to public meetings and to the Ohio Wildlife Council.

But their pleas have fallen on deaf ears so far. The Ohio Division of Wildlife is sticking to its control plan as prescribed by the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies. They say states that have abandoned CWD control measures have suffered skyrocketing numbers of sick deer and other cervids.

In April, the council approved expanded hunting next year for the CWD surveillance area that encompasses part of Hardin, Wyandot and Marion counties. Archery season will start early there and be open Sept. 10, 2022 to Feb. 5, 2023. And an early gun season will run Oct. 8 to Oct. 10, 2022. All these dates will be in addition to the statewide youth gun and regular deer hunting seasons next fall and winter.

Fragale and Sims attended the April council meeting and left as soon as the new regulations that expanded hunting in the surveillance area were approved. They appeared unhappy that their pleas fell on deaf ears.

Council member Dr. Paul Mechling, DVM, commented at the end of the meeting that their arguments carried no validity.

Categories: CWD, Ohio – Jane Beathard, Whitetail Deer
Tags: chronic wasting disease, CWD, Deer


 

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Since 1967 we get story after story about the government's inability to mitigate a disease affecting the contribution of billions of dollars to our nation's GDP and supporting hundreds of thousand jobs. I'm guessing that maybe, just maybe, either (1) government isn't the answer; or, (2) someONE else needs to be in charge (someONE being the operative word!).




 

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The article assumes more knowledge of the history of the problem than I have. Is there some widespread conflict between those that want to mitigate and those that don't? Or is it a matter of how to mitigate?
 

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American Cervid Alliance?....The Buckeye Forest Council's dirty sister.
So the American Cervid Alliance believes that ignoring CWD spread in the wild, and denying the devastated deer populations in Wisconsin et al.; is a better plan the nipping it in the bud when discovered? WTF?
 
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