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CWD Just keeps on spreading.....

PA is ramping up the deer kill again. It is expected that the rifle season in 2021 will be statewide concurrent (if it's brown it's down) as was the Gary Alt deer management program when it started ! Already deer tracks in the snow are hard to come by in many public hunting areas statewide and a couple deer can make a lot of tracks as any informed hunter knows. The PGC now gets most of its income from its own land, natural resources and right of ways ! They are no longer dependent on hunters dollars as they once were in the 60's and 70's, thus they no longer listen as they once did to the hunter's voices. They continue to want to reduce an already very depleted PA deer herd. Our states Outdoor News Paper like that of Ohio's is full of testimonies from disgruntled hunters who have hunted and seen few or no deer and have seen less and less deer each year, some get lucky and see one they can harvest, but good deer hunting as most seasoned hunters are concerned is a thing of the past in PA ! There are some exceptions, they are Private property, hard to hunt areas that for obvious reasons limit the number of hunters thus reducing the number of deer harvested, allowing more to survive then in more hunter friendly areas. They may be areas of steep terrain, swampy boggy areas, and areas so thick it is next to impossible to see them or get through the cover yourself. The main reason for the drastic reduction of the deer herd is to reduce the spread of CWD, I said reduce, because you are NOT GOING TO STOP THE SPREAD of CWD once it has arrived in your state ! That's something that has never been done yet ! But regardless of what kills the deer hunters or some form of disease, they are disappearing very fast in PA. My own opinion as to why they are still trying to what would appear as eliminating the deer population is to protect their ever so prestigious Elk herd ! It is also a money maker, many $10 applications come in from states all across America and that adds up quick ! Myself I could care less about the elk when it comes to having one or the other, I am a deer hunter and I don't even apply for an Elk permit. I believe you could nearly kill one of the damn tame things with a hammer ! I prefer a moderate deer herd over them with a passion. So do most true deer hunters.
 

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Even with a double fence could a squirrel not climb through/over come in contact with that and then pass it along to non-captive deer outside? Anyone educated on the transmission of it, is this possible?
Not a great chance but anything that could carry prions out could spread the disease, and the carrier of prions would not have to come in contact with wild deer. As the people have said that have a piece of paper that says they are smart, the prions only have to get into the ground and into a plant and then eaten by a white tailed deer. so any way the prions can be carried out of any infected site could pose a threat. Perhaps even the wind could carry something to the outside that contains CWD prions and have it eventually contracted by wild deer? Lots of ways of transmitting it according to the smart people that have a piece of paper stating they are smart ! I don't think a fire would remove all of the prions either, Fires don't even prevent seeds in the ground from starting to grow after a fire moves through, and the prions in the ground ? They may be there for many years fire or no fire !
 

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One of the things that some other states have done was remove their antler restrictions so that more of the younger bucks ( the ones that leave and travel the most) are harvested to "slow" the spread of CWD. Slowing is all that can be done at this time, there is no stopping of it once it arrives ! None that I have heard of. But in PA the PGC talks out both sides of their heads, they are willing to kill deer off using sharp shooters but won't lift the antler restrictions or even let senior hunters harvest them as they do handicapped, military personal and junior hunters and the senior hunters many who have trouble walking any distance or across rough terrain because of the terrible disease called "age" and who have funded the PGC all of their hunting lives are not being allowed to harvest bucks that may likely carry CWD to other parts of the state or to other states that border PA., Ohio is one of those states !
 

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It keeps on spreading....... BioHazard zone for 5 years!!!! If our State has an outbreak at some point, it could get ugly.

Nine more deer added to tally of CWD positive whitetails at Houston County farm
February 23, 2021


St. Paul, Minn. - Test results following the late-January depopulation of a Houston County white-tailed deer farm confirm nine additional cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD). Results from the National Veterinary Services Laboratories confirmed the detection of CWD in five does and four bucks. The farm first detected CWD in a 2½-year-old white-tailed deer in October 2020.

"This herd was in good standing in our farmed cervid program and was double-fenced since 2017," said Board Assistant Director, Dr. Linda Glaser. "It's an example of how elusive CWD can be to detect and control quickly before it infects multiple animals within a herd. Ten infected animals despite an owner following all regulations highlights why we need the research to catch up to the disease."

A total of 46 white-tailed deer were depopulated on January 26 and all were sampled for CWD. The Houston County farm is not allowed to have any deer or elk for five years. Owners must maintain fencing to prevent wild deer from accessing empty pens. Biohazard signs will be posted on the fencing and must be maintained for the entire five-year fallow period.

CWD is a disease of the deer and elk family caused by prions, which can damage brain and nerve tissue. The disease is most likely transmitted when infected deer and elk shed prions in saliva, feces, urine, and other fluids or tissues. CWD is not known to naturally occur in other animals. The disease is fatal in deer and elk, and there are no known treatments or vaccines. Consuming meat from a CWD positive animal is not advised.

- Minnesota Board of Animal Health

https://www.outdoornews.com/2021/02...d-positive-whitetails-at-houston-county-farm/
 
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No more tick- tock.....it's here.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife has identified a second positive test for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a wild white-tailed deer in Wyandot County. The mature doe was harvested in January during a controlled hunt on the Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area refuge, within 2 miles of the first positive location.

CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer and other similar species, including mule deer, elk, and moose. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no strong evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans.

The first CWD-positive deer was a mature buck taken by a hunter on private property and confirmed in December 2020. Mandatory deer disease sample collection occurred during controlled hunts at Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area, which is how the second positive was detected. The second positive deer allows wildlife professionals to focus CWD management efforts as surveillance and testing in the area continue.

https://www.outdoornews.com/2021/03/07/second-ohio-deer-tests-positive-for-cwd/#:~:text=Harpster, Ohio - The Ohio DNR,tailed deer in Wyandot County.&text=In 2020, approximately 4,500 deer,deer breeding facilities in Ohio.
 

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This was a great hunt got new hunters and youth because of all the deer but they should have opened it up sooner to help avoid this issue. Hunted there with my daughter once and we saw over 30 deer by 2pm. I know others who have seen 70+. It won't be that way any longer.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/outdoors-deer-disease-biologists-high-183100259.html
So now it starts as in PA the deer will die by one or the other means, but the end result will be the same LESS DEER in the area they cull deer to check for CWD! They shot about 125 several years ago in one of PA's CWD management areas and NOT A ONE HAD CWD, what a damn shame, all that managed to do was ruin deer hunting inn that area, OH yes less deer to get CWD or anything else ! Out West where it started the Elk and deer herds that are infected I read are holding their own with no significant lower numbers. BUT ! Are the animals safe to eat? They can keep trying to find a cure or preventative that can be put into feed and distributed in different areas in and around CWD area's, but that cure may never come. So what needs to be done also and maybe more urgently is to determine if the eating of the meat from an infected animal is or isn't going to transmit CWD to people. Now it's been over 50 years they have lived with it in the West, and may live with it that much longer or perhaps forever and so may we. That's why it is of utmost importance to determine if it can be transmitted to humans by eating the meat of an infected animal. I for one will not eat it if I know the animal had CWD, some don't care. And culling I believe only kills that many more deer. I would be for it if they could tell ahead what ones had it.
 

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BB, I agree with you 100%. They say it's in the brain, eyes, spinal column, and glands. I don't eat any of that so I want to know if the meet is still good. As far as I know there's no known transmission to humans.
 

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BB, I agree with you 100%. They say it's in the brain, eyes, spinal column, and glands. I don't eat any of that so I want to know if the meet is still good. As far as I know there's no known transmission to humans.
as far as I know you are right, but they were able to transmit to primates, the next thing to humans. However I think they mutated it somehow first. But that being said the current Covid-19 is mutating into different variations and it is questionable if the current vaccines will combat them all. This Some say can happen with CWD so that man can contract it. Yes all the parts you mentioned contain the prions that cause CWD, but blood flows also to all of those parts, just another thing to think about ! And many killed deer are hit in areas that contain the majority of these prions, what then ? Does it spread rapidly through the rest of the deer, or while butchering are parts hit with a knife that contain prions ? I just would not trust eating one regardless of what part I was eating or where it was hit. That's just me, here where I live CWD is creeping closer each year, I am glad I saw the best years of hunting in PA, but I fret for my grandkids and future generations as to if they will be able to hunt a decent population of deer. I feel many places in my area already are below standards that should be as far as deer populations are concerned, and the PGC wants a combined season statewide again (two weeks of rifle season) Don't let Ohio become another PA ! Good luck, from the late great deer hunting state Pennsylvania.
 

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We now may have a field test for CWD…..


New chronic wasting disease field ID test could be a game changer for deer hunters


A promising new way of field testing for chronic wasting disease (CWD) has the potential to become a game changer for hunters in determining whether the deer they shoot are infected with the disease.
Such a development and deployment could help “hunters decide the fate of the carcass before they even gut it,” says Ohio’s deer management administrator Mike Mike Tonkovich with the Ohio Division of Wildlife.

What has happened is that researchers with the University of Minnesota’s Center for Prion Research have developed a “novel approach to field testing chronic wasting disease,” the school said in a release that is enjoying a cascade of positive reviews among wildlife management officials.

Last spring, the Center’s team worked with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to analyze tissue samples from CWD-positive white-tailed deer using a scientific technique known as “RT-QuIC.”

This collaboration managed to obtain confirmation of protein-misfolding “in just nine hours,” the school says.

“Only a handful of labs currently have access to this top-of-the-line technology for CWD testing,” the school in further comments.

Now, the MNPRO researchers have developed a new assay that generates a color change of red for a positive CWD result and blue for negative. They have named the test “MN-QuIC” to honor the state of Minnesota.

“It is the product of an intense multi-disciplinary research effort that united scientists across the University of Minnesota,” says Peter Larsen, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine and co-director of MNPRO.

The team confirmed their findings in southeast Minnesota the week of March 8, 2021, making them the first-ever scientists to successfully deploy a CWD field test.

The school says also the new test “is a lot cheaper than those using traditional equipment and uses field-deployable equipment to garner preliminary results in just 24 hours.”

“We have performed over one hundred confirmatory tests in our MNPRO lab and this was our first field-deployment. We will continue to validate MN-QuIC over the coming months, and plan additional field deployments this fall,” Larsen said through the university.

Tonkovich is cautiously optimistic that field test kits with a 24-hour results turn-around time and made available to individual hunters will prove an important ally in both mitigating hunters’ fears and also helping contain CWD.

“Testing is a critical first step for managing this disease since if you can’t define its extent, you certainly can’t fight it,” Tonkovich says.
Tonkovich believes the hunters who would/will benefit the most from a CWD field test kit are those sportsmen who process their own deer - and to a lesser degree, those that pay to have a deer processed.

A large part of the reason for this expectation now, says Tonkovich, is that most hunters can’t wait two weeks to process their deer if they likewise have to await the results from the current procedure needed to test an animal’s carcass.

Thus, says Tonkovich, a successful hunter can proceed with processing, with “those hunters who then ultimately learn they’ve harvested a positive animal only having wasted a bit of time, should they then decide to pitch the venison from the deer they put in the freezer.”

Yet the flip side is how a hunter who uses a deer processor will react should his animal be dropped off, found to be infected 24 hours later, and ultimately take a pass on paying to store and process the deer, Tonkovich wonders.

“Since disposal is not free, my guess is that there will be a charge passed on to the hunter, and I’m guessing it will likely come in the form of a deposit,” Tonkovich said.

Even so, once a CWD field test is widely available, “hunters can decide the fate of the carcass,” Tonkovich says.

“This will not only be a time and cost savings for them, but obviously - and more importantly - it will completely eliminate the possibility of that hunter moving the disease around on the landscape. Hats of to Dr. Larsen and his collaborators,” Tonkovich said.

By Jeffrey L. Frischkorn
[email protected]
[email protected]
 

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And the disease just keeps on spreading……

Release #30-21
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 26, 2021
For Information Contact:
Travis Lau, Game Commission
717-705-6541
[email protected]
Shannon Powers, Department of Agriculture
717-783-2628
[email protected]

WARREN COUNTY DEER TESTS POSITIVE FOR CWD
The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today announced a confirmed positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a white-tailed deer on a Warren County hunting preserve. Remaining deer were euthanized and CWD was not detected in any of the samples. The department has quarantined the preserve for five years. Contact tracing to determine any further exposure is in progress and may necessitate additional quarantines.

“Pennsylvania has taken CWD very seriously, taking aggressive steps to contain the disease, using a scientific, fact-based approach,” State Veterinarian Dr. Kevin Brightbill said. “We will continue to investigate and implement rigorous controls on any business whose deer may have been exposed, and we are working with New York state regulatory partners to mitigate the threat.”

CWD is a highly contagious disease that develops very slowly in the lymph nodes, spinal tissue and brains of deer and similar animals like reindeer and elk. It does not affect other livestock. To date there is no evidence that it can be spread to humans.
The PA Department of Agriculture oversees the state’s deer farming industry. Pennsylvania’s 760 breeding farms, hunting preserves and hobby farms provide breeding does, breeder and trophy bucks, semen, embryos, antlers and urine products to Pennsylvania and states across the nation.

In 2020, the department established a CWD Core Captive Management Zone, implementing aggressive measures to control the disease in the area of the state where it is most prevalent, while allowing deer farms to stay in business.

A map of farms that have had CWD-positive deer, and locations of positive deer in the wild can be found on the agriculture department’s website, along with information by county on farms under quarantine.

The new detection will also result in a new CWD Disease Management Area (DMA) being established. The Pennsylvania Game Commission is working to delineate the new DMA’s boundary, which will be finalized and announced in the coming weeks.
Within DMAs, specific regulations meant to slow or stop the human-assisted spread of CWD across the landscape apply. It's illegal within DMAs to rehabilitate injured deer, possess or use cervid urine-based attractants and feed free-ranging deer. Hunters who harvest deer in DMAs may not transport those deer outside of a DMA without first removing the high-risk deer parts.

Those who live or hunt in the area that is likely to fall within the new DMA’s boundaries are urged to watch for the coming announcement and visit pgc.pa.gov where the most up-to-date CWD information always can be found.

Advice for hunters, processors and taxidermists for safe handling of deer carcasses, and information about requirements for deer farms can be found at agriculture.pa.gov.

Find more information about comprehensive efforts to control CWD in Pennsylvania in the 2020 report, “Combatting CWD in Pennsylvania.”
 
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