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CWD Just keeps on spreading.....

PA is ramping up the deer kill again. It is expected that the rifle season in 2021 will be statewide concurrent (if it's brown it's down) as was the Gary Alt deer management program when it started ! Already deer tracks in the snow are hard to come by in many public hunting areas statewide and a couple deer can make a lot of tracks as any informed hunter knows. The PGC now gets most of its income from its own land, natural resources and right of ways ! They are no longer dependent on hunters dollars as they once were in the 60's and 70's, thus they no longer listen as they once did to the hunter's voices. They continue to want to reduce an already very depleted PA deer herd. Our states Outdoor News Paper like that of Ohio's is full of testimonies from disgruntled hunters who have hunted and seen few or no deer and have seen less and less deer each year, some get lucky and see one they can harvest, but good deer hunting as most seasoned hunters are concerned is a thing of the past in PA ! There are some exceptions, they are Private property, hard to hunt areas that for obvious reasons limit the number of hunters thus reducing the number of deer harvested, allowing more to survive then in more hunter friendly areas. They may be areas of steep terrain, swampy boggy areas, and areas so thick it is next to impossible to see them or get through the cover yourself. The main reason for the drastic reduction of the deer herd is to reduce the spread of CWD, I said reduce, because you are NOT GOING TO STOP THE SPREAD of CWD once it has arrived in your state ! That's something that has never been done yet ! But regardless of what kills the deer hunters or some form of disease, they are disappearing very fast in PA. My own opinion as to why they are still trying to what would appear as eliminating the deer population is to protect their ever so prestigious Elk herd ! It is also a money maker, many $10 applications come in from states all across America and that adds up quick ! Myself I could care less about the elk when it comes to having one or the other, I am a deer hunter and I don't even apply for an Elk permit. I believe you could nearly kill one of the damn tame things with a hammer ! I prefer a moderate deer herd over them with a passion. So do most true deer hunters.
 

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Even with a double fence could a squirrel not climb through/over come in contact with that and then pass it along to non-captive deer outside? Anyone educated on the transmission of it, is this possible?
Not a great chance but anything that could carry prions out could spread the disease, and the carrier of prions would not have to come in contact with wild deer. As the people have said that have a piece of paper that says they are smart, the prions only have to get into the ground and into a plant and then eaten by a white tailed deer. so any way the prions can be carried out of any infected site could pose a threat. Perhaps even the wind could carry something to the outside that contains CWD prions and have it eventually contracted by wild deer? Lots of ways of transmitting it according to the smart people that have a piece of paper stating they are smart ! I don't think a fire would remove all of the prions either, Fires don't even prevent seeds in the ground from starting to grow after a fire moves through, and the prions in the ground ? They may be there for many years fire or no fire !
 

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One of the things that some other states have done was remove their antler restrictions so that more of the younger bucks ( the ones that leave and travel the most) are harvested to "slow" the spread of CWD. Slowing is all that can be done at this time, there is no stopping of it once it arrives ! None that I have heard of. But in PA the PGC talks out both sides of their heads, they are willing to kill deer off using sharp shooters but won't lift the antler restrictions or even let senior hunters harvest them as they do handicapped, military personal and junior hunters and the senior hunters many who have trouble walking any distance or across rough terrain because of the terrible disease called "age" and who have funded the PGC all of their hunting lives are not being allowed to harvest bucks that may likely carry CWD to other parts of the state or to other states that border PA., Ohio is one of those states !
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,084 ·
It keeps on spreading....... BioHazard zone for 5 years!!!! If our State has an outbreak at some point, it could get ugly.

Nine more deer added to tally of CWD positive whitetails at Houston County farm
February 23, 2021


St. Paul, Minn. - Test results following the late-January depopulation of a Houston County white-tailed deer farm confirm nine additional cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD). Results from the National Veterinary Services Laboratories confirmed the detection of CWD in five does and four bucks. The farm first detected CWD in a 2½-year-old white-tailed deer in October 2020.

"This herd was in good standing in our farmed cervid program and was double-fenced since 2017," said Board Assistant Director, Dr. Linda Glaser. "It's an example of how elusive CWD can be to detect and control quickly before it infects multiple animals within a herd. Ten infected animals despite an owner following all regulations highlights why we need the research to catch up to the disease."

A total of 46 white-tailed deer were depopulated on January 26 and all were sampled for CWD. The Houston County farm is not allowed to have any deer or elk for five years. Owners must maintain fencing to prevent wild deer from accessing empty pens. Biohazard signs will be posted on the fencing and must be maintained for the entire five-year fallow period.

CWD is a disease of the deer and elk family caused by prions, which can damage brain and nerve tissue. The disease is most likely transmitted when infected deer and elk shed prions in saliva, feces, urine, and other fluids or tissues. CWD is not known to naturally occur in other animals. The disease is fatal in deer and elk, and there are no known treatments or vaccines. Consuming meat from a CWD positive animal is not advised.

- Minnesota Board of Animal Health

https://www.outdoornews.com/2021/02...d-positive-whitetails-at-houston-county-farm/
 
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No more tick- tock.....it's here.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife has identified a second positive test for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a wild white-tailed deer in Wyandot County. The mature doe was harvested in January during a controlled hunt on the Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area refuge, within 2 miles of the first positive location.

CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer and other similar species, including mule deer, elk, and moose. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no strong evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans.

The first CWD-positive deer was a mature buck taken by a hunter on private property and confirmed in December 2020. Mandatory deer disease sample collection occurred during controlled hunts at Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area, which is how the second positive was detected. The second positive deer allows wildlife professionals to focus CWD management efforts as surveillance and testing in the area continue.

https://www.outdoornews.com/2021/03/07/second-ohio-deer-tests-positive-for-cwd/#:~:text=Harpster, Ohio - The Ohio DNR,tailed deer in Wyandot County.&text=In 2020, approximately 4,500 deer,deer breeding facilities in Ohio.
 

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This was a great hunt got new hunters and youth because of all the deer but they should have opened it up sooner to help avoid this issue. Hunted there with my daughter once and we saw over 30 deer by 2pm. I know others who have seen 70+. It won't be that way any longer.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/outdoors-deer-disease-biologists-high-183100259.html
So now it starts as in PA the deer will die by one or the other means, but the end result will be the same LESS DEER in the area they cull deer to check for CWD! They shot about 125 several years ago in one of PA's CWD management areas and NOT A ONE HAD CWD, what a damn shame, all that managed to do was ruin deer hunting inn that area, OH yes less deer to get CWD or anything else ! Out West where it started the Elk and deer herds that are infected I read are holding their own with no significant lower numbers. BUT ! Are the animals safe to eat? They can keep trying to find a cure or preventative that can be put into feed and distributed in different areas in and around CWD area's, but that cure may never come. So what needs to be done also and maybe more urgently is to determine if the eating of the meat from an infected animal is or isn't going to transmit CWD to people. Now it's been over 50 years they have lived with it in the West, and may live with it that much longer or perhaps forever and so may we. That's why it is of utmost importance to determine if it can be transmitted to humans by eating the meat of an infected animal. I for one will not eat it if I know the animal had CWD, some don't care. And culling I believe only kills that many more deer. I would be for it if they could tell ahead what ones had it.
 

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BB, I agree with you 100%. They say it's in the brain, eyes, spinal column, and glands. I don't eat any of that so I want to know if the meet is still good. As far as I know there's no known transmission to humans.
as far as I know you are right, but they were able to transmit to primates, the next thing to humans. However I think they mutated it somehow first. But that being said the current Covid-19 is mutating into different variations and it is questionable if the current vaccines will combat them all. This Some say can happen with CWD so that man can contract it. Yes all the parts you mentioned contain the prions that cause CWD, but blood flows also to all of those parts, just another thing to think about ! And many killed deer are hit in areas that contain the majority of these prions, what then ? Does it spread rapidly through the rest of the deer, or while butchering are parts hit with a knife that contain prions ? I just would not trust eating one regardless of what part I was eating or where it was hit. That's just me, here where I live CWD is creeping closer each year, I am glad I saw the best years of hunting in PA, but I fret for my grandkids and future generations as to if they will be able to hunt a decent population of deer. I feel many places in my area already are below standards that should be as far as deer populations are concerned, and the PGC wants a combined season statewide again (two weeks of rifle season) Don't let Ohio become another PA ! Good luck, from the late great deer hunting state Pennsylvania.
 

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We now may have a field test for CWD…..


New chronic wasting disease field ID test could be a game changer for deer hunters


A promising new way of field testing for chronic wasting disease (CWD) has the potential to become a game changer for hunters in determining whether the deer they shoot are infected with the disease.
Such a development and deployment could help “hunters decide the fate of the carcass before they even gut it,” says Ohio’s deer management administrator Mike Mike Tonkovich with the Ohio Division of Wildlife.

What has happened is that researchers with the University of Minnesota’s Center for Prion Research have developed a “novel approach to field testing chronic wasting disease,” the school said in a release that is enjoying a cascade of positive reviews among wildlife management officials.

Last spring, the Center’s team worked with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to analyze tissue samples from CWD-positive white-tailed deer using a scientific technique known as “RT-QuIC.”

This collaboration managed to obtain confirmation of protein-misfolding “in just nine hours,” the school says.

“Only a handful of labs currently have access to this top-of-the-line technology for CWD testing,” the school in further comments.

Now, the MNPRO researchers have developed a new assay that generates a color change of red for a positive CWD result and blue for negative. They have named the test “MN-QuIC” to honor the state of Minnesota.

“It is the product of an intense multi-disciplinary research effort that united scientists across the University of Minnesota,” says Peter Larsen, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine and co-director of MNPRO.

The team confirmed their findings in southeast Minnesota the week of March 8, 2021, making them the first-ever scientists to successfully deploy a CWD field test.

The school says also the new test “is a lot cheaper than those using traditional equipment and uses field-deployable equipment to garner preliminary results in just 24 hours.”

“We have performed over one hundred confirmatory tests in our MNPRO lab and this was our first field-deployment. We will continue to validate MN-QuIC over the coming months, and plan additional field deployments this fall,” Larsen said through the university.

Tonkovich is cautiously optimistic that field test kits with a 24-hour results turn-around time and made available to individual hunters will prove an important ally in both mitigating hunters’ fears and also helping contain CWD.

“Testing is a critical first step for managing this disease since if you can’t define its extent, you certainly can’t fight it,” Tonkovich says.
Tonkovich believes the hunters who would/will benefit the most from a CWD field test kit are those sportsmen who process their own deer - and to a lesser degree, those that pay to have a deer processed.

A large part of the reason for this expectation now, says Tonkovich, is that most hunters can’t wait two weeks to process their deer if they likewise have to await the results from the current procedure needed to test an animal’s carcass.

Thus, says Tonkovich, a successful hunter can proceed with processing, with “those hunters who then ultimately learn they’ve harvested a positive animal only having wasted a bit of time, should they then decide to pitch the venison from the deer they put in the freezer.”

Yet the flip side is how a hunter who uses a deer processor will react should his animal be dropped off, found to be infected 24 hours later, and ultimately take a pass on paying to store and process the deer, Tonkovich wonders.

“Since disposal is not free, my guess is that there will be a charge passed on to the hunter, and I’m guessing it will likely come in the form of a deposit,” Tonkovich said.

Even so, once a CWD field test is widely available, “hunters can decide the fate of the carcass,” Tonkovich says.

“This will not only be a time and cost savings for them, but obviously - and more importantly - it will completely eliminate the possibility of that hunter moving the disease around on the landscape. Hats of to Dr. Larsen and his collaborators,” Tonkovich said.

By Jeffrey L. Frischkorn
[email protected]
[email protected]
 

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And the disease just keeps on spreading……

Release #30-21
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 26, 2021
For Information Contact:
Travis Lau, Game Commission
717-705-6541
[email protected]
Shannon Powers, Department of Agriculture
717-783-2628
[email protected]

WARREN COUNTY DEER TESTS POSITIVE FOR CWD
The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today announced a confirmed positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a white-tailed deer on a Warren County hunting preserve. Remaining deer were euthanized and CWD was not detected in any of the samples. The department has quarantined the preserve for five years. Contact tracing to determine any further exposure is in progress and may necessitate additional quarantines.

“Pennsylvania has taken CWD very seriously, taking aggressive steps to contain the disease, using a scientific, fact-based approach,” State Veterinarian Dr. Kevin Brightbill said. “We will continue to investigate and implement rigorous controls on any business whose deer may have been exposed, and we are working with New York state regulatory partners to mitigate the threat.”

CWD is a highly contagious disease that develops very slowly in the lymph nodes, spinal tissue and brains of deer and similar animals like reindeer and elk. It does not affect other livestock. To date there is no evidence that it can be spread to humans.
The PA Department of Agriculture oversees the state’s deer farming industry. Pennsylvania’s 760 breeding farms, hunting preserves and hobby farms provide breeding does, breeder and trophy bucks, semen, embryos, antlers and urine products to Pennsylvania and states across the nation.

In 2020, the department established a CWD Core Captive Management Zone, implementing aggressive measures to control the disease in the area of the state where it is most prevalent, while allowing deer farms to stay in business.

A map of farms that have had CWD-positive deer, and locations of positive deer in the wild can be found on the agriculture department’s website, along with information by county on farms under quarantine.

The new detection will also result in a new CWD Disease Management Area (DMA) being established. The Pennsylvania Game Commission is working to delineate the new DMA’s boundary, which will be finalized and announced in the coming weeks.
Within DMAs, specific regulations meant to slow or stop the human-assisted spread of CWD across the landscape apply. It's illegal within DMAs to rehabilitate injured deer, possess or use cervid urine-based attractants and feed free-ranging deer. Hunters who harvest deer in DMAs may not transport those deer outside of a DMA without first removing the high-risk deer parts.

Those who live or hunt in the area that is likely to fall within the new DMA’s boundaries are urged to watch for the coming announcement and visit pgc.pa.gov where the most up-to-date CWD information always can be found.

Advice for hunters, processors and taxidermists for safe handling of deer carcasses, and information about requirements for deer farms can be found at agriculture.pa.gov.

Find more information about comprehensive efforts to control CWD in Pennsylvania in the 2020 report, “Combatting CWD in Pennsylvania.”
 
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Update on Ohio......we are now more involved in the CWD control game with the other 25 states.

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife announced today that it has enacted a disease surveillance area in three north-central counties following the discovery of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in two wild white-tailed deer harvested during the 2020-21 hunting season.

The disease surveillance area includes Wyandot County as well as portions of Hardin and Marion counties and includes the area within a 10-mile radius from both positive detections. This includes all 13 townships in Wyandot County; Jackson, Goshen, and Dudley townships in Hardin County; as well as Grand, Grand Prairie, Salt Rock, Montgomery, Big Island, and Marion townships in Marion County. The area will be mapped and posted at wildohio.gov, along with more information about CWD in Ohio.

The first wild deer that tested positive for CWD in the 2020-21 season was a mature buck harvested in fall 2020 in Wyandot County. The second wild deer, a yearling doe, was taken from the Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area refuge during a controlled hunt in January 2021.

Although ODNR had been monitoring the areas and an additional 72 deer were tested from that location after the hunting season with no positives detected, the move to create a disease surveillance area allows for the enactment of additional rules that, with the help of Ohio’s hunters, will allow Division of Wildlife biologists to better monitor the disease.

The following regulations apply within the disease surveillance area:

  • Requires hunters to bring either the head or complete carcasses of all deer harvested within the disease surveillance area boundaries to a Division of Wildlife inspection station or self-serve kiosk for sampling. Dates and times of operation of both in-person inspection stations and self-serve kiosks will be posted at wildohio.gov.
  • Beginning immediately, prohibits the placement of or use of salt, mineral supplement, grain, fruit, vegetables, or other feed to attract or feed deer within the disease surveillance area;
  • Beginning immediately, prohibits hunting of deer by the aid of salt, mineral supplement, grain, fruit, vegetables, or other feed within the disease surveillance area;
  • Prohibits the removal of a complete carcass or high-risk parts from the disease surveillance area, unless the carcass complies with deer carcass regulations or the carcass is delivered to a certified taxidermist or processor within 24 hours of leaving the disease surveillance area. Additional information on carcass regulations and a complete list of certified processors and taxidermists can be found at wildohio.gov.
Normal agricultural activities, including feeding of domestic animals, as well as hunting deer over food plots, naturally occurring or cultivated plants, and agriculture crops are not prohibited.

CWD is a highly contagious fatal disease that develops slowly in members of the deer family (including elk, moose, and caribou). No evidence exists that CWD can spread to humans, pets, livestock, or other animals outside the deer family. CWD has been detected in 26 states and three Canadian provinces.
 

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Keep getting uglier, especially when the owners to the fenced operations dump infected deer outside of the fenced area and apread the disease to he wild herd.....you would think we should be shutting these down a long time ago.

Deer farming drives predicament over CWD-infested dump site
Tony Kennedy, Star Tribune 6/11/2021
Deer farming drives predicament over CWD-infested dump site
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Minnesota officials are scrambling on several fronts to fight against the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in northern deer herds where the always fatal neurological disease has traveled to Beltrami County by virtue of commercial deer farming.

Gov. Tim Walz wants the Legislature to strip deer farming oversight from the Board of Animal Health; the DNR is racing to build a fence around public land where the heavily infected deer farm dumped carcasses; University of Minnesota researchers want emergency funding to expand CWD testing at the dump site; state wildlife officials are applying for more federal funds to fight CWD; and the Minnesota Deer Farmers Association is suing the state to halt part of DNR's aggressive response to the outbreak.

CWD could have already spread from the dump site to an abundant population of wild deer previously considered untouched by CWD. The farmer, whose identity has not been revealed, accepted an undisclosed amount of federal money this spring to go out of business and have his herd killed and tested.

After a state investigation determined that nine other Minnesota deer farms in eight counties could be linked to the Beltrami farm outbreak, the DNR on June 1 imposed a two-month moratorium against the movement of any Minnesota farmed white-tailed deer for any reason to another location. According to the Board of Animal Health, 143 captive deer at the nine farms are considered exposed to CWD and should be killed and tested.

Investigators suspect the Beltrami farm became entangled with CWD by unknowingly acquiring a CWD-infected deer from a trophy buck deer farm in Winona County. The same Winona farm has been described as the vector to a separate CWD outbreak on a deer farm in Houston County.

But Gary Leistico, the St. Cloud attorney who represents deer farmers in their lawsuit before the Minnesota Court of Appeals, said the DNR's "stop movement" order is preventing some herd owners from meeting contractual obligations for the delivery of livestock. Unfairly, Leistico said, the movement ban includes farms certified as "CWD-free."
He said deer farmers don't have a lack of concern for CWD spreading to whitetails in the wild, but that the DNR overreached state law by stepping in.

According to the DNR, the movement ban was necessary to contain the current spread of CWD for the sake of wildlife. The DNR said it was also buying time to evaluate potential solutions. CWD — already established at very low prevalence rates in southeastern Minnesota — poses the threat of "extensive and irreversible damage" to wild deer, the agency has said.

Michelle Carstensen, DNR's wildlife health group leader, said the Beltrami case provides new incentive for the state to dwell on prevention of CWD outbreaks rather than chasing them and trying to mitigate them.

Her division is once again applying to the U.S. Agriculture Department for nearly $250,000 in CWD grant money to offset the costs for CWD testing of the wild deer population in the Beltrami response area. Some of the money also would go toward a second year of wild deer testing around a CWD-positive deer farm in Douglas County.
For every new CWD battleground in Minnesota, taxpayers spend nearly $1 million or more to monitor and mitigate the spread.

In a letter sent this week to key committee leaders at the Legislature, Walz said lawmakers should transfer deer farm oversight to the DNR.

"It's clear that we need a new strategy to address the problem of CWD in farmed white-tailed deer," the governor wrote.
Three years ago, the Minnesota Legislative Auditor's Office issued a report that said the Board of Animal Health was cozy with deer farms and lax on regulations meant to prevent CWD transmission.

The Minnesota Deer Hunters' Association, based in Grand Rapids, has responded to the Beltrami outbreak with a call for tighter controls on deer farms. In a letter to legislators, the group called for the transfer of deer farm oversight to DNR, a moratorium against any new deer farms and other reforms. Many of the ideas have been introduced in the House, but not the Senate, where there has been resistance.

Also emerging from the Beltrami deer farm outbreak is a push by researchers at the U's College of Veterinary Medicine to expand the use of new technology to detect CWD-causing prions in the environment. The team headed by scientist Peter Larsen wants to deepen work at the site, applying this week for $108,000 in emergency funding from the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources. The LCCMR liked the request and sent it to Walz for his approval.

Meanwhile in the tiny town of Hines, Minn., where the defunct Beltrami deer farm dumped carcasses on tax-forfeited land controlled by the county, the DNR is working to secure a route across private land to build a fence that would keep wild deer away from the contagions.
Blane Klemek, assistant northwest region wildlife manager for the DNR, said the project will need attention for a minimum of 20 years. He said specifications call for a 10-foot-high, woven-wire fence that must span three stretches of wetland. The enclosed land and water will measure 12 acres.


Also in the works is a joint powers agreement between DNR, Beltrami County and the Board of Animal Health to lay out cost sharing and other responsibilities. Klemek said his division's highest priority is to stop the spread of CWD. He noted that the carcass dump site is in the midst of a popular deer hunting area with "lots of established deer camps."
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,098 ·
So Minnesota has now added the following to try and handle the issue above.................transportation needs to stop and the farms shut down. We are moving infected cervids from one place to another and spreading the disease.

Law change aims to help contain chronic wasting disease in Minnesota
Dan Gunderson
Moorhead
July 5, 2021 8:46 a.m.
ListenMPR News - Law change aims to help contain chronic wasting disease in Minnesota
White-tailed deer in Michigan.

A pair of white-tailed deer bucks feed by waters edge at dusk in East Lansing, Mich.
Al Goldis | AP 2011

A new law gives the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) authority to inspect farms where deer are raised, a fundamental change at a time when deer herds, wild and tame, are threatened by an always-fatal disease.
The reason those inspections are a contentious issue is that chronic wasting disease has often spread when infected farmed deer are moved around the state. Previously, the Minnesota Board of Animal Health handled inspections, as the agency in charge of protecting the health of domesticated animals.

The Department of Natural Resources manages wild animal populations and has occasionally clashed with the state animal health board over the management of chronic wasting disease.

"Somebody with a DNR shirt [will be] part of annual inspections on farms and operations and so we can identify those things that we think are risks to white-tailed deer — and see that they get fixed,” said Dave Olfelt, director of the DNR’s fish and wildlife division.

Olfelt said the DNR and the Board of Animal Health have different priorities concerning the operation of 174 farms that raise white-tailed deer in captivity.

“The condition of a fence, for example, I think it's fair to say that the producer and we might see that risk slightly differently,” said Olfelt.

“Another thing might be where a producer feeds the deer inside the fence. We've seen an example where there are big hopper feeders for deer right inside the fence and the seed is landing on the ground. It's actually bouncing through the fence and attracting wild deer. That's creating a risk that’s pretty easily mitigated. Those are the examples of the kinds of things we would be looking for.”

An outbreak of the neurological disease on a farm in Beltrami County earlier this year sparked an outcry because it marked a significant spread of the disease to northern Minnesota and posed an expanded risk to wild white tailed deer.


After the Beltrami County outbreak, DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen used her emergency powers to impose a temporary ban on the movement of farmed deer, even though the agency did not have regulatory authority over those farms.

State Rep. Jamie Becker-Finn, DFL-Roseville, has been an outspoken critic of the Board of Animal Health.
She's pleased the DNR now has increased authority to inspect deer farms, but she worries the law language will cause confusion. Both agencies have equal authority.

"Let's say the DNR says, ‘We need to hit the pause button on any deer movement for a certain amount of time,’ and then what happens if the Board of Animal Health thinks that isn't necessary, because they're kind of coming at this problem from different priority viewpoints?" Becker-Finn said.

A Board of Animal Health spokesperson said it’s too early in the process to comment on the law change, but the agency will work with the DNR on a shared oversight agreement.

The DNR’s Olfelt said discussions are already underway to create a memorandum of understanding with the board.
“It's pretty high stakes here for our agency, as well as the board, to do this well, said Olfelt. “So I think that's where our focus is right now. We're both in the hot seat over this, and so we're committed to making it work."
It's unclear when an agreement between the two agencies will be finalized.

The Minnesota Deer Farmers Association declined to commenton the DNR's new authority until the agencies have worked out details of the agreement, but an official said there "are concerns about how the agencies will divide their responsibilities."

Olfelt said he wants to be clear that the DNR will not try to shut down the farmed deer industry.
Recently a group of about two dozen DFL state lawmakers called on the president of the Board of Animal Health to resign, saying the management of chronic wasting disease has let down the hundreds of thousands of Minnesotans who hunt deer.

Reached through a spokesperson, Board of Animal Health President Dean Compart said he has no plans to leave the position.

The two agencies must report back to the legislature by early next year on how they are working together and provide additional recommendations for managing the spread of chronic wasting disease.
 
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PA update——-


Release #65-21
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 21, 2021
For Information Contact:
Travis Lau
717-705-6541
[email protected]


OPEN HOUSE TO INFORM PUBLIC ABOUT CWD​

The Pennsylvania Game Commission is hosting an open house to inform the public about Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), which poses a serious threat to the state’s white-tailed deer and elk.
The event is set for 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 29, at Russell Volunteer Fire Co., 111 Perrigo Lane, Russell, PA 16345.

CWD, which is always fatal to the deer and elk it infects, was first detected in Pennsylvania in captive deer in 2012 and in wild, free-ranging whitetails a few months later. Since then, CWD has been detected in 730 whitetails. No Pennsylvania elk have ever tested positive for the disease.

To limit the spread of CWD, the Game Commission has enacted special regulations in several spots around Pennsylvania. These areas are known as Disease Management Areas (DMAs) and the Established Area (EA).

There are four DMAs across the state. The newest, DMA 5, was created in 2021 in response to a CWD-positive deer found on a captive facility. It covers 212 square miles completely within Warren County.
The EA is a smaller portion of DMA 2. It accounts for roughly 90 percent of all CWD cases detected in Pennsylvania to date.

The goal of the special rules within the DMAs and the EA – which include bans on feeding deer, using or possessing cervid urine-based attractants, and moving high-risk deer parts – is to limit the spread of the disease.


Hunters are also prohibited from bringing high-risk parts – brains, spinal columns, backbones, lymph nodes and more – back into Pennsylvania from any other state or Canadian province.

Those who want to learn more about CWD, how it is spread, the regulations within DMAs and the EA, what they must do if they harvest and/or plan to have mounted a whitetail in a DMA or the EA, who harvest a deer, elk or moose outside Pennsylvania, and what they can do to help fight CWD are encouraged to attend the Sept. 29 event.

Visitors to the open house will be able to check out various educational stations at their own pace. Game Commission staff will be on hand at each to offer information and answer questions.

A map showing the exact location and boundaries for each DMA and the EA is available on the Game Commission website,www.pgc.pa.gov. Click “Chronic Wasting Disease” under “Quick Clicks.” That link also provides lots of other CWD information.
 

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PA is a mess and CWD continues to spread. It now is starting to threaten the Elk herd. Sad…..


Release #72-21
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Oct. 22, 2021
For Information Contact:
Travis Lau
717-705-6541
[email protected]


NEWLY DETECTED CWD-POSITIVE LEADS TO DMA3 EXPANSION AND A NEW DMA​

A CWD-positive deer recently detected in Jefferson County has led to new regulations to reduce the risk of the disease spreading.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission today announced the expansion of Disease Management Area 3 (DMA 3) and the creation of a new DMA (DMA 6).

Detection of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a road-killed deer on the northern boundary of DMA3 prompted these changes. The adult male was collected as part of ongoing CWD surveillance efforts.

CWD affects deer, elk, and other members of the deer family. The disease is fatal to any deer or elk infected with it, and CWD has no treatment or cure.
When a new CWD-positive is detected in either a wild or captive deer or elk in Pennsylvania, a Disease Management Area (DMA) is established. DMAs are created to reduce risk of human-assisted spread of CWD.

This new CWD detection is within 2 miles of Pennsylvania’s elk management area. The short distance to the elk management area required creating DMA 6 within the elk management area. DMA 6 will prevent high-risk parts from the entirety of DMA 3 being moved into the elk management area.

“If a CWD-positive animal is found within any elk hunt zone, all elk hunt zones will become a DMA due to the behavior and longer distance movements of elk,” said Andrea Korman, Game Commission CWD wildlife biologist. “If this were to occur, the impact on deer and elk populations, hunters, and the public will be significant. Although this has not occurred yet, this newly found positive deer shows how close it is.”

DMA 6 was created to restrict movement of high-risk parts into the elk management area and to restrict human activities known to increase disease risk.
Within all DMAs, it is unlawful to;


  • · Remove or export any deer or elk high-risk parts (e.g., head, spinal column, and spleen) from a DMA. This also prevents movement of high-risk parts between adjacent DMAs
  • · Use or possess deer or elk urine-based attractants
  • · Directly or indirectly feed wild, free-ranging deer. It is already illegal to feed elk regardless of DMA location
  • · Rehabilitate wild, free-ranging deer or elk
To increase surveillance around the detection, a new DMAP Unit (#4760) was also created. Over 1,300 permits have been made available for this unit and allow hunters to take up to two additional antlerless deer. Hunters can get DMAP permits by providing the unit number (4760) online or at license-issuing agents.

In conjunction with the additional hunting opportunities, hunters are asked to provide samples for CWD testing. Submitting harvested deer heads for CWD testing helps determine the extent of CWD infection.

The Game Commission offers free CWD testing within the DMAs. Hunters should deposit the heads of deer they harvest with properly filled out and legible harvest tags in one of the head-collection containers the Game Commission provides within DMAs. Locations of head-collection containers can be found atArcGIS Web Application. Antlers should be removed from bucks before the double-bagged head is placed in a collection container. Hunters can check for their test results online or by calling the CWD hotline (1-833-INFOCWD).

For deer hunters in DMAs – especially those who live outside the DMA – it’s important to plan their hunt and know ahead of time what they will do with any deer harvested. Since high-risk cervid parts can’t be removed from any DMA, even if they share a boundary like DMAs 3 and 6, successful hunters cannot transport whole deer outside the DMA.
Hunters can take deer they harvest to a processor within the DMA or on the list of approved processors for the DMA where they harvested the deer. The list of approved processors and taxidermists is available at www.pgc.pa.gov/CWD. Approved processors properly dispose of the high-risk parts. Hunters can also dispose of high-risk parts in trash that is destined for a landfill or quarter the animal and leave the high-risk parts at the kill site. The meat, antlers (free of brain material) and other low-risk parts then can be transported outside the DMA.

Deer hunters getting taxidermy mounts also must take their harvests to a taxidermist within the DMA or on the list of approved processors and taxidermists for the DMA in which they harvested the deer available at www.pgc.pa.gov/CWD.
Although CWD has not been documented in humans, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends never eating the meat of a CWD-positive deer.

Much more information on CWD is available at www.pgc.pa.gov/CWD.
DMA 3 boundary has been expanded and is as follows:

Beginning at the southernmost point at the intersection of State Highway 403 and State Highway 286 in the town of Clymer, proceed east on State Highway 286 for 4.9 miles to State Highway 240. Follow in State Highway 240 east for 8.5 miles to the intersection of US Highway 219. Follow US Highway 219 north for 2.4 miles to Sylvis Road. Follow Sylvis Road east for 5.8 miles to the intersection of State Highway 36. Follow State Highway 36 east for 8.8 miles to the intersection of La Jose Road (SR-3016) in Newburg. Follow La Jose Road east for 3.6 miles becoming Cherry Corner Road (SR-3005) for another .3 mile to the intersection of Marron Road (SR-3016). Turn left onto Marron Road and follow northeast for 2.7 miles to the intersection of State Road 729. Follow State Road 729 east for .9 miles to the intersection of Old Station Road. Follow Old Station Road (SR-2012) east for 2.4 miles to the intersection of Douglas Road (SR-3007). Continue east on Douglas Road for .3 miles to the intersection of Zion Road (SR-2012) near New Millport. Follow Zion Road east for 4.5 miles to the intersection of Faunce Road (SR-2012). Turn right and follow Faunce Road east for 3.1 miles becoming Sanborn Road (SR-2012) in Woodward Township. Continue east on Sanborn Road for 2.5 miles to the intersection of State Highway 153. Follow State Highway 153 north for 5 miles to the intersection of Valley Road (SR-2027). Follow Valley Road north for 2.1 miles becoming Hogback Hill Road (SR-2027). Continue north on Hogback Hill Road for 1 mile to the intersection of Main Street in Mineral Springs. Turn right on Main Street for .2 miles to the intersection of Bigler Cutoff Road. Turn left on Bigler Cutoff Road for .1 miles to the intersection of US Highway 322. Follow US Highway 322 east for .7 miles to the intersection of State Highway 970. Follow State Highway 970 north for 1.5 miles to the intersection of Interstate Highway 80. Follow I-80 west for 26.4 miles to the exit for State Highway 219 north. Follow State Highway 219 north for 21.2 miles to Boot Jack becoming State Route 948. Follow State Route 948 for 4.2 miles to the Clarion River in Ridgway. Follow the Clarion River for 28.3 miles to Bridge Road. Continue south on Bridge Road for 0.05 mile to the intersection of State Highway 949. Turn right on State Highway 949 and continue west for 16.3 miles to the intersection of US Highway 322 in Corsica. Follow US Highway 322 east for 0.3 miles to the intersection of State Highway 949. Follow State Highway 949 south for 4.2 miles to the intersection of State Highway 28. Follow State Highway 28 south for 13.2 miles to the intersection of State Highway 839 in New Bethlehem. Follow State Highway 839 south for 21 miles to State Highway 85. Follow State Highway 85 south for 11.7 miles to the intersection of US Highway 119 in the town of Home. Turn left on US Highway 119 and follow 3.4 miles to the intersection of State Highway 403 in Marion Center. Follow State Highway 403 south for 8.5 miles to Clymer at the place of beginning.

DMA 6 is in portions of Clearfield, Elk, and Jefferson Counties and its exact boundary is as follows:
Beginning at the northeast corner at the intersection of Chicken Hill Road and State Route 948 in the town of Kersey, proceed south on Chicken Hill Road for 0.9 mile becoming South Kersey Road. Follow South Kersey Road south for 1.4 miles. Continue straight onto Boone Mountain Road for 6.5 miles to the intersection with State Route 153. Turn left onto State Route 153 and continue south 4.9 miles to State Route 255. Turn right on State Route 255 and continue south for 9.5 miles to Interstate Highway 80. Turn right on Interstate Highway 80 and continue west 4.4 miles to State Highway 219. Turn right on State Highway 219 and continue north 21.1 miles to State Route 948. Turn right on State Route 948 and proceed east for 5.3 miles to Kersey at the place of beginning.
 
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