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Another article with additional information-

For first time, CWD found in Ohio
December 15, 2020

(Photo by Bob "Greenie" Grewell)
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Biologists have said for years that it's just a matter of time before Ohio sees its first case of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in the wild white-tailed deer herd.

That time has come.

The Ohio DNR (ODNR) Division of Wildlife has identified a positive test for CWD in a wild Ohio white-tailed deer in Wyandot County. The Division of Wildlife is gathering additional details about the adult male deer taken by a hunter on private property. Tissue samples were submitted for testing by a taxidermist and the positive test was identified after results were obtained on Dec. 10.

CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer and other similar species, including mule deer, elk, and moose. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no strong evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans.

The Division of Wildlife will implement its CWD response plan, which includes enhanced surveillance within a 10-mile radius of the CWD positive deer location in Wyandot County. Mandatory deer disease sample collection will occur on all remaining Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area controlled hunts. Hunters who harvest a deer in Wyandot County during the remaining deer hunting season, which closes on Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021, will be contacted to obtain disease samples by Division of Wildlife staff.

The Division of Wildlife has conducted routine surveillance for CWD since 2002, testing more than 25,000 deer without finding a CWD positive deer in the wild herd. CWD has previously been detected at captive deer breeding facilities in Ohio. Find more information about Ohio's CWD surveillance at wildohio.gov.

CWD has been detected in 26 states and four Canadian provinces. The disease was first discovered in the 1960s in the western U.S. More information about this disease is available at cwd-info.org.

Hunters should take precautions when handling and processing any harvested deer. Hunters may have a harvested deer tested at the Ohio Department of Agriculture's Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for a small fee. Call (614) 728-6220 for more information.
 

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Mr Frisckhorn's perspective .....

We all saw this coming: First case of CWD in a wild Ohio white-tail deer

Following is a release from the Ohio Division of Wildlife on the finding of chronic wasting disease in a wild Ohio deer. The animal came from Wyandot County in west-central/northwest Ohio.

It should not come as too much of a surprise. The state - via its Department of Agriculture, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and - especially the Ohio General Assembly - has done an abysmal job of doubling down to keep this dreaded disease from entering Ohio and eventually expanding.

Chief among Ohio's failure is its hand-wringing on allowing the spread and establishment of captive deer herds for fun and for profit. Similar to the state legislature from stopping totally the trade in exotic animals of all kinds as pets.

In any event, here's the Wildlife Division's press announcement on the subject:

"The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife has identified a positive test for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a wild Ohio white-tailed deer in Wyandot County. The Division of Wildlife is gathering additional details about the adult male deer taken by a hunter on private property. Tissue samples were submitted for testing by a taxidermist and the positive test was identified after results were obtained on Thursday, December 10, 2020.

"CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer and other similar species, including mule deer, elk, and moose. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no strong evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans.

"The Division of Wildlife will implement its CWD response plan, which includes enhanced surveillance within a 10-mile radius of the CWD positive deer location in Wyandot County. Mandatory deer disease sample collection will occur on all remaining Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area controlled hunts. Hunters who harvest a deer in Wyandot County during the remaining deer hunting season, which closes on Sunday, February 7, 2021, will be contacted to obtain disease samples by Division of Wildlife staff.

"The Division of Wildlife has conducted routine surveillance for CWD since 2002, testing more than 25,000 deer without finding a CWD positive deer in the wild herd. CWD has previously been detected at captive deer breeding facilities in Ohio. Find more information about Ohio's CWD surveillance at wildohio.gov.

"CWD has been detected in 26 states and four Canadian provinces. The disease was first discovered in the 1960s in the western U.S. More information about this disease is available at cwd-info.org.

"Hunters should take precautions when handling and processing any harvested deer. Hunters may have a harvested deer tested at the Ohio Department of Agriculture's Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for a small fee. Call (614) 728-6220 for more information."
- Jeffrey L. Frischkorn
[email protected]
[email protected]
 

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Years back pretty much the only movement of CWD positive deer between states was due to deer farms. Now that CWD is found in so many states in the wild, it definitely could have been an out of state hunter unknowingly bringing in a CWD infected carcass and discarding infected deer parts.
I would think it would be hard to get it from deer parts, I know they say that but deer I don't think would go near such parts, it would take time for it to get into plants and then have the deer eat the plants and get it. I would rather believe it came from another infected deer. If they found one you can bet it wasn't the only one in the state. Or if they know what they are talking about it could have come from some hunters mock scrape from a year or many years ago, since they claim it lasts for years ! More food for thought, maybe a hunter caused it. And what about the thousands of mock scrapes others have made over the years that may possibly put prions into the ground for eternity ??? Or what about that positive deer having been depositing urine around to different scrapes that perhaps hundreds of other deer may visit?
 

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Staff reporter for the news herald in lake county and columnist for Outddor News for over 30 years. He has a blog he writes on the outdoors. See below.
http://outdoorswithfrischkorn.blogspot.com/?m=1
Well, just slap me upside the head. I guess I need to get out more often. Ha!

This disease was discovered over fifty years ago. This thread itself is six years old! (It's still informative, and a credit to deehntr56.) Yet still today neither Ohio's Ag. nor DNR (The public really doesn't know which or who within them is in charge!) have a "handle" on this disease. I must say that the ROI on my nickel in this billion-dollar endeavor called free-roaming deer hunting doesn't leave me with a warm fuzzy feeling that I've invested wisely in the current administration.
 

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Well, just slap me upside the head. I guess I need to get out more often. Ha!

This disease was discovered over fifty years ago. This thread itself is six years old! (It's still informative, and a credit to deehntr56.) Yet still today neither Ohio's Ag. nor DNR (The public really doesn't know which or who within them is in charge!) have a "handle" on this disease. I must say that the ROI on my nickel in this billion-dollar endeavor called free-roaming deer hunting doesn't leave me with a warm fuzzy feeling that I've invested wisely in the current administration.
Every State has mis-managed this from the beginning and the Wildlife resources suffered. Many states knew the transporting of Farm Raised cervids from farm to farm and across state lines were spreading the disease faster and it continued to happen. Department of Agriculture continued to allow these operations to exist. It's just a big mess and it's going to be a very expensive mess. It also will affect the wild population in a negative manner as well as those that hunt for meat, since testing will become part of the process.

It Just gets uglier........

CWD found in Grand Teton National Park


JACKSON, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK)-Wyoming Game and Fish biologists have confirmed chronic wasting disease in an elk in Grand Teton National Park. The state's Wildlife Health Laboratory confirmed the finding December 16.

The cow elk was harvested by a hunter participating in the park's elk reduction program. Tissue samples were collected as part of the park's mandatory testing program. It is the first elk to test positive for CWD in northwest Wyoming and in close proximity to the National Elk Refuge and other elk feedgrounds.

Wildlife managers say that while the positive test in an elk raises concern, the positive test result does not come as a surprise based on the steady progression of the disease westward across the state and the positive result for a mule deer in Grand Teton National Park in the fall of 2018. A mule deer also tested positive for CWD in Star Valley in 2016, the Pinedale area in 2017, and two mule deer in the Wyoming Range in 2020.

Game and Fish said it has been undertaking intensive surveillance of the Jackson elk herd since 2009. Over 4,500 CWD samples have been collected and tested. More than 1,400 samples have been collected through the elk reduction program alone. This is the first elk to test positive.

State, federal and other agencies within the Jackson and Greater Yellowstone area will continue to coordinate on efforts to address CWD.

The positive test result comes as Game and Fish is in the process of a collaborative effort to discuss future management of elk feed grounds in Wyoming. The department stresses that there is no plan to close any feed grounds at this time.

A map of CWD endemic areas is available here.

To date, there have been no cases of CWD in humans and no strong evidence for the occurrence of CWD in people. There are some experimental studies that raise concern that CWD may pose a risk to humans and that it is important to prevent human exposure.

That is why Game and Fish and the National Park Service adhere to the recommendation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization that hunters not consume any animal that is obviously ill or tests positive for CWD.


https://localnews8.com/news/local-news/2020/12/18/cwd-found-in-grand-teton-national-park/#:~:text=(KIFI/KIDK)-Wyoming Game,the park's elk reduction program.
 

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Money and politics is what it’s all about imo and I agree 100% it’s been miss managed from the beginning
 

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This recent CWD news just adds to the dumpster fire that is 2020.
Hope covid doesn’t morph and spread to the deer herd. Then we will really be screwed!
On a more serious note, I spoke with my local GW today and he said we can likely expect to see some new regulation around baiting next year with this recent CWD confirmation.
 

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On a more serious note,I spoke with my local GW today and he said we can likely expect to see some new regulation around baiting next year with this recent CWD confirmation.
Yep, and look for many more regulations on the wild herd, but the deer farms just plug along.
 

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Some additional info on Ohio and some interesting info in the article in Bold below-Millions will now be spent in controlling the disease.

It was just a matter of time: But, state's first case of CWD in the wild is in Wyandot County, not Holmes or Wayne

Art Holden

It wasn't a case of IF it would happen, but WHEN it would happen. And in 2020, it happened.

On Monday, Dec. 14, the Ohio Division of Wildlife confirmed that the first case of Chronic Wasting Disease in the wild deer population in Ohio was detected. But, to a lot of people's surprise, the positive whitetail didn't show up locally, in Wayne or Holmes counties, where CWD over the last six years has popped up on three different occasions at captive cervid facilities. No, this case was in the north-central part of the state in Wyandot County.

Ohio now becomes the 26th state with a CWD positive in the wild.

"My reaction is just as big as the news in 2014 when World Class Whitetails went positive," said Dr. Mike Tonkovich, the Deer Program Administrator for the Ohio Division of Wildlife. "But quite honestly, it's a lot like old age - it's inevitable."

"When you get a positive, you have to send it there," said Tonkovich. "We're doing our due diligence."

So, where do we go from here? First off, the Division of Wildlife will implement its CWD response plan, which includes enhanced surveillance within a 10-mile radius of the CWD positive deer location in Wyandot County.

Mandatory deer disease sample collection will occur on all remaining Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area controlled hunts. Hunters who harvest a deer in Wyandot County during the remaining deer hunting season, which closes on Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021, will be contacted to obtain disease samples by Division of Wildlife staff.

It'll be interesting to see how outdoorsmen react to the new regulations in north-central Ohio, where the Division of Wildlife will now be taxed with trying to walk the line between restrictions and balancing the resource, all while trying not to lose hunters.

Clearly, Wayne and Holmes County hunters got tired of DSA regulations, including turning in samples of deer harvested in the eastern Holmes and western Tuscarawas County DSA. Recent numbers showed just a 39 percent compliance rate by hunters during the Nov. 30-Dec. 6 deer-gun season.

"This changes things," said Tonkovich, noting he realizes it's hard for hunters to "buy into" something they can't see. "We'll see now how the Ohio hunter reacts. It's a different day when the deer (infected with CWD) is outside the pen."

When questioned, Tonkovich reported that there are nine deer farms in the surrounding counties around the Wyandot County CWD-positive wild deer, but was quick to point out that there are many ways the deer could have come in contact with the infectious prions.

Prions have been known to live for years in the soil, and can even be transferred in plants. Someone could have brought back unbeknownst to them an infected out-of-state deer and dumped its bones and hide in the woods. The possibilities are endless.

"There's more than one way CWD can enter a county, and maybe Wyandot County highlights that," said Tonkovich.

And while Tonkovich said that doing some genetic analysis on the deer may give biologists insight into how the deer got infected, he noted that what the Division of Wildlife does next is what's most important.

"It's complicated, but it's also simple," said Tonkovich. "We've got to manage the herd."

https://www.the-daily-record.com/st...cwd-wild-wyandot-not-holmes-wayne/3962719001/
 

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Bad news but good to have information. Thank you for taking the time to post this John.
 

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I must admit I am somewhat naive to how states have managed cwd in the past. It has never affected me directly so I have little need to stay updated. But that does bring a question up for those who claim to be more informed; if you believe cwd has been mis-managed so far, what would you have done differently if in charge? I’m not meaning just in Ohio but in all states. Interested to hear your perspectives.
 

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So, is Tonkovich in charge of the CWD in Ohio's deer? If not, just who is? For that matter, is ODNR in charge? Or, perhaps it is OD/Ag?

[Sarcasm alert!]

My guess is that no one steps up and says, "I am." But, having taken the bureaucratic oath, several will step up and say, "Well, I've got this 'piece of the pie' and I think that they have that 'piece.'"

That's just one hell of a way to fight a war.

Perhaps it would help if we could get all the deer to wear masks outside when they are in groups that can't stay six feet apart, and all the time when they come inside public places.

And, perhaps only "essential" deer would be allowed to continue doing whatever it is they do, while all the others must remain in place.

And, perhaps deer shouldn't be allowed to eat or drink after 10 pm on private property.

And, perhaps if President Trump sticks around he would call on all the countries of the world with cervid populations to push for a cure. It would probably be ready in 180 days.

[This might be more humorous if it all weren't so sad.]

Don't get me wrong; CWD is a game-changer and it is one of which the vast majority of the body politic isn't even aware. Just wait for when CWD starts to affect the economies of those other than the captive cervid operators.

Finally, whenever I hear a government employee say "due diligence," I only hear "DILLIGAS."
 

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... if you believe cwd has been mis-managed so far, what would you have done differently if in charge? I'm not meaning just in Ohio but in all states. Interested to hear your perspectives.
Boy, that would be fun....for a short time.

1) Never have allowed feed for deer to be placed afield by any means beyond ma nature's best try....fine violators and land owners whether the bait is hunted over, used for polaroid opportunities or, simply exists.
2) Never have allowed the industrial or hobby farming of deer(for all that genetics, size, antler stuff, etc.).
3) If one missed the bus bringing in either the feeder or the farm Deer Big Business, I would have taxed those outfits until it hurt and then, doubled it. That would be on top of increased regulations, raised insurance requirements and damage charges resulting from the actions of their wards.
4) Kept the whitetail herd low in population by whatever means necessary(within reason) and on even footing of state interest and importance with that of rabbits.
5) Required deer hunters to pony up for a deer damage stamp and have a portion of the license cost(increased) tightly ear-marked to study of deer damage in all it's forms...including cwd.
6) Prohibited the transportation of live or dead deer into or thru the state.....I would not suggest building a wall.
7) Prevented any deer farms which slip thru the character net to have any connection with State AG departments...that has proven bad juju.
8) Prevented tv hosts with guitars or publicity/marketing departments trying to gin up Outfitter operations ....heck just eliminate the Outfitting business, what was I thinking.
8) Shut down before it got started....the leasing of Corporate properties for deer and, hopefully, shun those leasing on Private acreage. Requiring a brown letter "L" on jacket or cap of lessors and their clients would be considered....a touch in between on this as many folks may not understand what the "L" represents.
9) Placed all types of hunting on the same stoop.

All a bit fanciful and works a further bit only by addressing the bitter root of the problem, ie the deer hunters, but "if in charge" and, a start.

In truth, addressing an issue like cwd is tough, especially when all are not on the same page or too many seek to protect their own oxen or field of play....especially again, when the question of an answer arises well after the problem becomes fact.
The learning curve is steep, the infection curve may be as well...hopefully, science will direct a typically curving path ahead and the party folks will not obstruct by looking at their own happiness.
 
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CWD Just keeps on spreading.....

 
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I must admit I am somewhat naive to how states have managed cwd in the past. It has never affected me directly so I have little need to stay updated. But that does bring a question up for those who claim to be more informed; if you believe cwd has been mis-managed so far, what would you have done differently if in charge? I'm not meaning just in Ohio but in all states. Interested to hear your perspectives.
1st you address the source that is spreading the disease. Transporting state to state across the country penned raised cervids that carry the disease from Game Farm to Game Farm is one reason why the disease is spreading so fast. Animals with CWD cannot be tested until the animal has died. You have no idea what you are transporting from one game farm to another. We have no idea how many have escaped into the wild. The fantasy that many hunters have of antlers have created this problem along with others wanting to profit from it. Game farms IMO is one of the major reasons the disease is spreading quickly. There is enough money there that until that is addressed by the dept. of agriculture in each state or federal level, it will continue to happen due to the money involved.

What will happen is once CWD is found in the wild, the Wildlife divisions will have to clean up the mess, and at what cost? Millions have been spent in many states and Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Wyoming, Minnesota along with many others spends millions each year trying to control the spread. Once it infects a population and based on how deep it is, that specific area or zone will be heavily hunted to reduce the population of the deer to control the spread. There are many articles in this thread explaining what is coming. They are worth the read.

Just because we had only "one" deer positive in wood county so far doesn't mean we are out of the woods. Remember we have no idea how widespread the disease is until we have dead deer to test. There are others, and not just in Wood or Holmes county. Random sampling only tells you what you have with the sample.

If you have a few hours here is the CWD Sampling Procedure and Program Standards Power Point that is 65 pages long.

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_diseases/cwd/downloads/cwd_program_standards.pdf

 

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If I were king, I would hire and put in charge of the CWD "war" the most accomplished and qualified person your money could buy. My guidance to that person would be clear and concise on what I expect to happen to win, both biologically and politically.
 
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