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I was wondering when I first gave it a read that's why I asked
With all the misinformation on the internet, I would not want to contribute to it!
I'm still learning about this whole CWD/EHD thing. I feel like I've been hearing about for awhile now and for the first time I'm really paying close attention and trying to learn more. Went through and read a good bit of this forum.... 56 seems like a good source for info.
 

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Thanks Blackcat- we need to get a handle on this disease, just for the reason we are the ones responsible for spreading it. At some point, someone has to take ownership and make it a priority.

Thanks Freebird-had my hands full the last couple of years with my elderly parents, and haven't been on here often, but tried to post priority information on limited time.

By the way, Freebird has been my favorite song since my college days, especially a couple of the live versions. ;)
 

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Thanks Blackcat- we need to get a handle on this disease, just for the reason we are the ones responsible for spreading it. At some point, someone has to take ownership and make it a priority.

Thanks Freebird-had my hands full the last couple of years with my elderly parents, and haven't been on here often, but tried to post priority information on limited time.

By the way, Freebird has been my favorite song since my college days, especially a couple of the live versions. ;)
Mine as well! All my friends have called me Freebird since I was about 15 lol. used to be a big fan of southern rock and jam bands when I made my account a decade ago, played in a few bands back then too. Im a bit older now and have 2 young ones so much of its fallen to the wayside, but Im getting active on this forum and having young sons has really kickstarted me getting outdoors again! So who knows, maybe music will come back around too
 

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Music has been with me since my high school years. The love of the outdoors also came into my life at that time. We moved out to the country and it was a game changer for me. Imo- The best rock and roll era was in the late 60's to mid 80's and I was part of it. Still have all my albums and most of my tapes from that time. Even have my stereo system from back then and spin a few albums now and then, just to reflect back to those good times. My Mom passed away in December and my dad passed away a few weeks back. Miss them a lot. We found an old tape recording from 1952 with my dad playing the accordion and my mom and their 15 friends singing------just incredible how they all sounded and so happy.

He played it up until last fall and friends and relatives would huddle around him as he played and sing along with him. It was an extension of their life and the smile on their face and everyone enjoying it is still ingrained in my mind.

Use to hang out at a friends place where his band practiced and we all became good friends during that time. The outside parties that went on with a live band has many good memories and some interesting ones too-lol.

"Freebird" had a impact in my life as I was starting to spread my wings, so to speak, and that song stuck with me from that point on. The plane crash killing Van Zant, Gaines, and backup singer Cassie Gaines was unfortunate and It's a shame such talented musicians died so young.

Enjoy the forum and have a good hunting season.
 

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Music has been with me since my high school years. The love of the outdoors also came into my life at that time. We moved out to the country and it was a game changer for me. Imo- The best rock and roll era was in the late 60's to mid 80's and I was part of it. Still have all my albums and most of my tapes from that time. Even have my stereo system from back then and spin a few albums now and then, just to reflect back to those good times. My Mom passed away in December and my dad passed away a few weeks back. Miss them a lot. We found an old tape recording from 1952 with my dad playing the accordion and my mom and their friends singing------just incredible how they all sounded and so happy.

He played it up until last fall and friends and relatives would huddle around him as he played and sing along with him. It was an extension of their life and the smile on their face and everyone enjoying it is still ingrained in my mind.

Use to hang out at a friends place where his band practiced and we all became good friends during that time. The outside parties that went on with a live band has many good memories and some interesting ones too-lol.

"Freebird" had a impact in my life as I was starting to spread my wings, so to speak, and that song stuck with me from that point on. The plane crash killing Van Zant, Gaines, and backup singer Cassie Gaines was unfortunate and It's a shame such talented musicians died so young.

Enjoy the forum and have a good hunting season.
Condolences for your parents 56. What great memories tho. They will last your lifetime. And the old tapes......priceless.
 

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Condolences for your parents 56. What great memories tho. They will last your lifetime. And the old tapes......priceless.
Thanks bankfish-

This is what we will deal with once it makes it to Ohio-lots of money and time invested to control the spread.....much like our experience with covid, but with no vaccine In sight. Tick-Tock....Tick-Tock

WI - DNR Offers Robust Statewide CWD Testing
Published on September 21, 2020

MADISON, Wis. - In cooperation with local businesses, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources staff will collect deer heads for chronic wasting disease (CWD) testing during the 2020 archery, crossbow and gun hunting seasons. The health of the deer herd relies on commitment from hunters.

Managing CWD begins with knowing where the disease exists on the landscape, and having this knowledge is only possible with a robust sample size, thanks to deer hunters around the state. Hunters should make plans to visit a sampling station to have their deer submitted for testing.

"Hunters who haven't had their deer tested before might be concerned about the time involved or just not know what to expect when having their deer tested," said Amanda Kamps, DNR wildlife health conservation specialist. "We offer a variety of ways for hunters to participate, letting them choose the route that's most convenient for them."

New this year, hunters have a digital option for entering their CWD testing information when visiting one of the hundreds of self-service and in-person sampling stations around the state. Successful hunters will find a unique link to the online form in their harvest registration confirmation email or in their Go Wild harvest history.

Testing for CWD is available to hunters statewide. This year, hunters in northwestern and northeastern Wisconsin are strongly encouraged to participate in the department's effort to map where CWD occurs throughout the state.

"This fall in particular, CWD testing by hunters in northwestern and northeastern Wisconsin will be crucial in our effort to understand where CWD occurs in our state," said Kamps. "Every last sample counts, so if you're hunting in one of these counties, make sure to visit us online to find the most convenient sampling location near you."

The counties with heightened focus in northwestern Wisconsin are: Ashland, Bayfield, Barron, Burnett, Douglas, Iron, Rusk, Sawyer and Taylor.

The counties with heightened focus in northeastern Wisconsin are: Brown, Calumet, Door, Fond du Lac, Forest, Green Lake, Kewaunee, Langlade, Manitowoc, Marinette, Marquette, Menominee, Oconto, Outagamie, Shawano, Sheboygan, Waupaca, Waushara and Winnebago.

Recent CWD positive cases in the Chippewa Valley area have spurred the need for increased sampling from deer harvested in Buffalo, Chippewa, Dunn, Eau Claire, Pepin and Trempealeau counties. Hunters who harvest deer in Marathon, Lincoln and Oneida counties are also encouraged to have their deer tested to monitor for CWD around recent positives there.

Find a map of where samples are most needed on the DNR website.

CWD Sampling Locations

Hunters have several options available to have their deer sampled for CWD, and all locations can be found on the DNR website. In addition to a network of 24/7 self-service sampling stations (also called kiosks) around the state, many meat processors and businesses offer in-person sampling assistance.

Hunters should contact staffed sampling stations in advance to verify hours of operation. For an interactive map with sampling locations available in your area, visit the DNR website. There is also a searchable database available as an alternative to the map view.

A sample consists of the deer head with 3-5 inches of neck attached. Hunters will also need to have their harvest authorization number, harvest location and contact information when submitting a sample. New this year, hunters may submit this information online rather than using a paper form. Hunters can find this new digital form in their registration confirmation email and in their harvest history in Go Wild.

To make special arrangements for large bucks, please call your nearby DNR wildlife biologist.

Deer Carcass Disposal

Hunters are encouraged to dispose of deer carcass waste in a licensed landfill that accepts this waste or in a dumpster designated for deer carcass waste. If a municipality allows deer disposal curbside or at a transfer station, the carcass should be double bagged. If these options are not available and the deer was harvested on private land, burying the deer carcass waste or returning it to the location of the harvest are the next best options. It is illegal to dispose of deer carcass waste on any public lands.

Hunters can find a map with the CWD sampling locations and deer carcass disposal locations on the DNR website as well as in the Hunt Wild app.

Baiting And Feeding

Hunters are reminded that baiting and feeding is prohibited in some counties. Check the DNR's baiting and feeding webpage frequently for updates. No counties in the state will be removed from the ban during the 2020 deer hunting seasons.

Prevent The Spread Of CWD

Voluntarily following recommended practices can reduce and prevent the spread of CWD. Those include proper carcass transportation, handling and disposal, reporting sick deer, following baiting and feeding regulations and cleaning and decontaminating equipment. Hunters may also follow urine-based scent recommendations.

Sick Deer Reports

DNR staff members are interested in reports of sick deer. To report a sick deer, contact local wildlife staff or call DNR Customer Service at 1-888-936-7463.

More information on CWD is available on the DNR website.

End of article. Article courtesy of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Full article can be found here: https://dnr.wisconsin.gov/newsroom/release/37926
 
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Tick-Tock....Tick-Tock.... Not only a lot of Money is utilized to fight the disease that the Division of Wildlife has to use, but additional opportunities to shoot more deer will happen to lower the populations....

DNR continues CWD response with 2 special hunts
December 8, 2020
Minnesota DNR Reports

(Minnesota DNR)
The Minnesota DNR has scheduled two special hunts in parts of southeastern Minnesota in December and January aimed at limiting the spread of chronic wasting disease in wild deer.

Residents and nonresidents can participate in the hunts from Saturday, Dec. 26, through Sunday, Dec. 27, and Saturday, Jan. 2, through Sunday, Jan 3, in deer permit area 343, the entire southeast management zone (deer permit areas 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, 655) and the south metro management zone (deer permit area 605).

"Special hunts are an important tool in disease management, allowing us to focus on specific areas where disease has been detected and reduce deer densities in targeted areas," said Barbara Keller, big game program leader.

All hunters, including archers, who harvest deer in these deer permit areas during the special hunts must submit a sample from any harvested deer to a self-service sampling station for disease testing. In other 2020 deer hunting seasons, hunters in designated areas were strongly encouraged, but not required, to submit samples.

Not only do the special hunts help limit disease spread, they show where disease is more prevalent through hunter-harvested samples tested for CWD, Keller said. This helps the DNR determine where to focus management actions to help keep the deer herd healthy.

The special hunt areas were determined from disease detections from this fall's hunting season and previous hunting seasons in southeastern Minnesota. Additional information about disease prevalence is needed through disease testing from these special hunts.

These hunts are part of the DNR's three-pronged CWD management approach. Because the disease is spread through direct contact with an infected deer's saliva, urine, blood, feces, antler velvet or carcass, reducing deer numbers in localized areas helps lower deer densities - the number of deer per square mile - and remove CWD-positive animals. The DNR also implements deer feeding and attractant bans to reduce the human-facilitated contact between deer, and restricts how hunters are allowed to move deer they harvest.

Hunters must plan ahead and check the special hunts webpage for complete details about the special hunts, including hunt rules; registration options; CWD sampling station, quartering sites and dumpster locations; carcass movement restrictions, a map of the hunt area; and information about the DNR's efforts to keep Minnesota wild deer healthy.

Hunters are required to drop off the head of any harvested deer at a self-service sampling station in their disease management zone. (Alternate sampling options are available for deer hunters who want to keep the antlers of their deer.)

The stations will be unstaffed in order to facilitate social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hunters should be mindful to follow precautions to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 while hunting and at the stations, including staying home if feeling sick, keeping a 6-foot distance from others and wearing a mask. To ensure safety of fellow hunters, please be patient at stations to accommodate these safety measures. Hunters who have not used these sampling stations before are encouraged to look at DNR resources in advance.

Mandatory carcass movement restrictions remain in effect throughout these special hunts. Whole carcasses cannot leave a management or control zone until a "not detected" CWD test result is received after providing a sample. Successful hunters may de-bone or quarter their deer to transport their harvest without brain and spinal column material.

Hunters must have a valid hunting license and use the appropriate weapon that matches the license to use any unfilled permits from 2020 deer hunting seasons. A disease management permit can also serve as a standalone license.

Hunters may purchase an unlimited number of disease management permits. During special hunts, these permits are valid on deer of either sex.

Archery hunters participating in the archery season that continues during the special hunts must submit samples for any deer harvested in the permit areas open for the special hunts.

Private land makes up most of the area within the hunt area and hunters must have landowner permission to hunt that land.

Some state parks, state scientific and natural areas, and federal lands will be open to hunting, with some exceptions or permit requirements. Please visit the special hunts webpage for information.

https://www.outdoornews.com/2020/12/08/dnr-continues-cwd-response-with-2-special-hunts/
 

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The time has come for Ohio-Buckle up for the ride folks.

Look for an aggressive deer reduction program in this area and potentially adjoining areas.

What's Ironic is that it was confirmed on December 10th-my Birthday.

"The positive test came from a white-tailed deer in Wyandot County northwest of Columbus.
The deer was shot by a hunter on private property, ODNR says. Tissue samples submitted by a taxidermist returned the positive result Dec. 10."

Chronic Wasting Disease detected in wild deer in Wyandot County

Chronic Wasting Disease has been detected in Ohio's wild deer herd for first time. (Source: WWNY)
By Stephanie Czekalinski | December 14, 2020 at 7:39 PM EST - Updated December 14 at 7:39 PM
CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - A deer taken on private property in Wyandot County had Chronic Wasting Disease, according to a press release from the Ohio Division of Natural Resources.

This is the first time the fatal neurological disease has been detected in Ohio's wild herd.

The Division of Wildlife will increase surveillance within the 10-mile radius of where the deer that tested positive was taken, according to the release.

Hunters who harvest deer in Wyandot County during the remaining deer season will be contacted to obtain disease samples.

The disease has been detected in 26 states and four Canadian provinces, according to the release.

Although, according to the Centers for Disease Control, there is no evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans, hunters should take precautions when handling and processing harvested deer.

The Department of Agriculture's Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory will test deer harvested in the state for a small fee.

https://www.cleveland19.com/2020/12/14/chronic-wasting-disease-detected-wild-deer-wyandot-county/
 

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The time has come for Ohio-Buckle up for the ride folks.

Look for an aggressive deer reduction program in this area and potentially adjoining areas.

What's Ironic is that it was confirmed on December 10th-my Birthday.

"The positive test came from a white-tailed deer in Wyandot County northwest of Columbus.
The deer was shot by a hunter on private property, ODNR says. Tissue samples submitted by a taxidermist returned the positive result Dec. 10."

Chronic Wasting Disease detected in wild deer in Wyandot County

Chronic Wasting Disease has been detected in Ohio's wild deer herd for first time. (Source: WWNY)
By Stephanie Czekalinski | December 14, 2020 at 7:39 PM EST - Updated December 14 at 7:39 PM
CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - A deer taken on private property in Wyandot County had Chronic Wasting Disease, according to a press release from the Ohio Division of Natural Resources.

This is the first time the fatal neurological disease has been detected in Ohio's wild herd.

The Division of Wildlife will increase surveillance within the 10-mile radius of where the deer that tested positive was taken, according to the release.

Hunters who harvest deer in Wyandot County during the remaining deer season will be contacted to obtain disease samples.

The disease has been detected in 26 states and four Canadian provinces, according to the release.

Although, according to the Centers for Disease Control, there is no evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans, hunters should take precautions when handling and processing harvested deer.

The Department of Agriculture's Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory will test deer harvested in the state for a small fee.

https://www.cleveland19.com/2020/12/14/chronic-wasting-disease-detected-wild-deer-wyandot-county/
It will be interesting to see what Ohio hunters want to do now and in the future as the wildlife commission will surely want to have the deer numbers lowered by whatever means as they do in PA and other places without really knowing what the final outcome will be. all they are hoping is to slow the spread of CWD, but it comes at the cost of the total deer population. It was easy to say what should be done when it doesn't effect ones hunting or the future populations of deer. This is just something to think about as those in other places effected by CWD has been doing. Yes we can shoot more deer or have them killed by sharpshooters or let CWD take its course, but the end result is what I and most hunters are concerned about is the future population of deer and the ability to continue having a hunting season as we now know it for us and future generations to come. You will see in the future where you will have to decide if you want infected deer and still be able to hunt, or have a population so low of deer that they should be protected ! That will be the question in the future, you may not believe it but you can look at PA where the state or public lands in many areas have few deer now, I saw one deer all season on state owned land and it was a 4 point Y buck illegal for me to harvest, yet on private lands on the most part remain lots of deer, and they are not dying off like some would have you believe. True some may have CWD, that is why I have said in the past that more research should be carried out to determine if eating the meat of infected deer is safe for humans, if not hunting as we have known it will surely end. I for one would never eat the meat of a deer that had CWD, others say they will but until it gets a clean bill I would never eat it. If CWD comes to my area I would only hunt large antlered deer and either give the meat to the brave or let the coyotes eat it ! They still know little more after years of this being around then they did when it first started. But the heard has grown in many areas that have CWD so the CWD don't appear to be going to exterminate the heard, I believe that only man can do that. This is just food for thought and I as all hope this can be stopped instead of left take its course, but what if?
 

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This will turn into a multi million dollar expense for the Division. Hunters can expect more dramatic culling programs and yearly testing. The "good old days" of hunting and not worrying about disease transmission is history. When the 1st case showed up in a "Deer Farm" the clock started to run for Ohio on when.

With Pa and Michigan as neighbors and CWD in those states it was a matter of time since we were already exposed inside of the state and on our boundaries of other states that had the disease. It's here now- Buckle up. Every deer I kill will be tested. I will also harvest less deer.

Maybe I'll just hunt pheasants and rabbits more and try new avenues going forward and hunt less deer. This way I will avoid the issue.

Release #79-20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Dec. 15, 2020

For Information Contact:

Bob Frye

814-706-5071

[email protected]

WOLF ADMINISTRATION REPORT DETAILS COORDINATED EFFORT TO COMBAT CWD

The Wolf Administration today released a report detailing coordinated efforts of state and federal agencies and Pennsylvania research institutions to combat Chronic Wasting Disease, or CWD, a contagious, fatal disease that threatens deer.

The report outlines the status of the disease in Pennsylvania, as well as the work in progress to offer testing and other services to hunters, help deer farmers maintain their livelihoods, and diminish disease spread and environmental impact.

"CWD threatens one of Pennsylvania's prized natural resources," Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding said. "This administration has taken aggressive steps to contain the disease through a scientific, fact-based approach. We are using new genetic testing tools to help predict which deer will contract the disease, funding research to help better understand and trace the disease and working together strategically to control its spread."

CWD is a highly contagious disease that develops very slowly in the lymph nodes, spinal tissue and brains of deer and similar animals like reindeer and elk. It does not affect other livestock. There is no evidence that it can be spread to humans.

"The Department of Health is committed to a healthy Pennsylvania," Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. "There is a lot we still need to learn about the impact CWD has on human health. That is why it is essential that each individual remains vigilant to reduce the risk of human exposure to CWD."

"As a member of the CWD Task Force, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is committed to working with other agencies and stakeholders to combat the spread of CWD through public education and outreach, effective deer management strategies, increased testing and other public policy initiatives based on sound science," said DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn. "Although there is still work to be done, DCNR applauds the administration's leadership and efforts of the collective agencies to prevent the further spread of this disease."

"Managing Chronic Wasting Disease is one of the greatest wildlife challenges we face," said Game Commission Executive Director Bryan Burhans. "It requires that we marry the best science with hunter cooperation over the long term. The good news is that wildlife managers and hunters partnered to save deer and deer hunting once before, more than a century ago. Our ability to succeed again now is dependent on the support of our hunters and private landowners to help us combat this disease.

The report offers advice hunters and others can follow to minimize risks and links to key disease-prevention resources.

· Participate in testing. Free testing is available for any deer harvested in a Disease Management Area, or DMA. If you harvest a deer, deposit the head, with your completed harvest tag affixed to the deer's ear, in a head collection container.

· If you are hunting within a DMA, before you leave the DMA, deposit high-risk parts from your deer in a high-risk parts disposal dumpster. High-risk parts include the head, lymph nodes, spleen, and spinal column. You may also dispose of any other unused deer parts in these dumpsters.

· Do not shoot, handle or consume an animal that appears sick; report the animal to the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

· Submit harvest tags and samples while hunting in CWD DMAP areas.

· Wear gloves when handling any cervid carcass and follow proper guidelines for processing venison.

· Have dedicated knives and utensils for processing game meats.

· Refrain from consuming high-risk tissues and organs (brain, heart, etc.)

· Avoid use of natural urine-based lures.

· If unable to deposit in DMA disposal dumpster, double bag high-risk parts and dispose of in an approved landfill.

The report was compiled by Pennsylvania's Chronic Wasting Disease Taskforce, formed in 2003 to develop a strategic response to the disease first detected in the U.S. in 1967, and in the Pennsylvania in 2012. The task force includes the Pennsylvania Departments of Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources, Environmental Protection and Health, and the Game Commission, as well as the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Find the complete report and more information about efforts to combat CWD in Pennsylvania at agriculture.pa.gov/CWD.

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Shannon Powers - Agriculture,[email protected], 717.603.2056

Nate Wardle - Health, [email protected]

Terry Brady - DCNR, [email protected], 717.877.6315

Bob Frye - Game Commission,[email protected], 814.706.5071
 

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This will turn into a multi million dollar expense for the Division. Hunters can expect more dramatic culling programs and yearly testing. The "good old days" of hunting and not worrying about disease transmission is history. When the 1st case showed up in a "Deer Farm" the clock started to run for Ohio on when.

With Pa and Michigan as neighbors and CWD in those states it was a matter of time since we were already exposed inside of the state and on our boundaries of other states that had the disease. It's here now- Buckle up. Every deer I kill will be tested. I will also harvest less deer.

Maybe I'll just hunt pheasants and rabbits more and try new avenues going forward and hunt less deer. This way I will avoid the issue.

Release #79-20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Dec. 15, 2020

For Information Contact:

Bob Frye

814-706-5071

[email protected]

WOLF ADMINISTRATION REPORT DETAILS COORDINATED EFFORT TO COMBAT CWD

The Wolf Administration today released a report detailing coordinated efforts of state and federal agencies and Pennsylvania research institutions to combat Chronic Wasting Disease, or CWD, a contagious, fatal disease that threatens deer.

The report outlines the status of the disease in Pennsylvania, as well as the work in progress to offer testing and other services to hunters, help deer farmers maintain their livelihoods, and diminish disease spread and environmental impact.

"CWD threatens one of Pennsylvania's prized natural resources," Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding said. "This administration has taken aggressive steps to contain the disease through a scientific, fact-based approach. We are using new genetic testing tools to help predict which deer will contract the disease, funding research to help better understand and trace the disease and working together strategically to control its spread."

CWD is a highly contagious disease that develops very slowly in the lymph nodes, spinal tissue and brains of deer and similar animals like reindeer and elk. It does not affect other livestock. There is no evidence that it can be spread to humans.

"The Department of Health is committed to a healthy Pennsylvania," Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. "There is a lot we still need to learn about the impact CWD has on human health. That is why it is essential that each individual remains vigilant to reduce the risk of human exposure to CWD."

"As a member of the CWD Task Force, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is committed to working with other agencies and stakeholders to combat the spread of CWD through public education and outreach, effective deer management strategies, increased testing and other public policy initiatives based on sound science," said DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn. "Although there is still work to be done, DCNR applauds the administration's leadership and efforts of the collective agencies to prevent the further spread of this disease."

"Managing Chronic Wasting Disease is one of the greatest wildlife challenges we face," said Game Commission Executive Director Bryan Burhans. "It requires that we marry the best science with hunter cooperation over the long term. The good news is that wildlife managers and hunters partnered to save deer and deer hunting once before, more than a century ago. Our ability to succeed again now is dependent on the support of our hunters and private landowners to help us combat this disease.

The report offers advice hunters and others can follow to minimize risks and links to key disease-prevention resources.

· Participate in testing. Free testing is available for any deer harvested in a Disease Management Area, or DMA. If you harvest a deer, deposit the head, with your completed harvest tag affixed to the deer's ear, in a head collection container.

· If you are hunting within a DMA, before you leave the DMA, deposit high-risk parts from your deer in a high-risk parts disposal dumpster. High-risk parts include the head, lymph nodes, spleen, and spinal column. You may also dispose of any other unused deer parts in these dumpsters.

· Do not shoot, handle or consume an animal that appears sick; report the animal to the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

· Submit harvest tags and samples while hunting in CWD DMAP areas.

· Wear gloves when handling any cervid carcass and follow proper guidelines for processing venison.

· Have dedicated knives and utensils for processing game meats.

· Refrain from consuming high-risk tissues and organs (brain, heart, etc.)

· Avoid use of natural urine-based lures.

· If unable to deposit in DMA disposal dumpster, double bag high-risk parts and dispose of in an approved landfill.

The report was compiled by Pennsylvania's Chronic Wasting Disease Taskforce, formed in 2003 to develop a strategic response to the disease first detected in the U.S. in 1967, and in the Pennsylvania in 2012. The task force includes the Pennsylvania Departments of Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources, Environmental Protection and Health, and the Game Commission, as well as the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Find the complete report and more information about efforts to combat CWD in Pennsylvania at agriculture.pa.gov/CWD.

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Shannon Powers - Agriculture,[email protected], 717.603.2056

Nate Wardle - Health, [email protected]

Terry Brady - DCNR, [email protected], 717.877.6315

Bob Frye - Game Commission,[email protected], 814.706.5071
They can try anything they want, but it will still spread they may slow it but so far the sharpshooters have not helped anything but ruined peoples hunting by killing deer that were no threat to the spreading of CWD, the one winter they killed like 124 deer and NONE had CWD, they kill more then the disease does. But lets face it they want trees to regenerate not deer ! The late great deer hunting state, " PA " Like I said, a lot of worry would be gone if they could confirm that it couldn't be transmitted to humans, or if cooking the meat at a certain temperature or way would kill the threat of contracting the disease. Until then I will not hunt in an area known to have CWD or even close to it. And once it covers the state I will only hunt for antlers unless it is confirmed safe to eat the meat of infected animals by then. I don't see pics of dead deer from CWD like I do of dead deer from EHD. Just more food for thought.
 

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I'm kind of the opposite. I'm not worried about the meat since it is a neurological disease. I have zero intention of eating the sweet breads, brains, or anything like that anyway.

I'm more curious in how it got there. Illegal dumping of deer from a CWD state? A high fence herd in the area?
 

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Talking with another who follows things like this as many spoke of lots of deer farmers in the western part of the state and SW you may have something with the dumping of infected animals but we may never know for sure
 

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I'm more curious in how it got there. Illegal dumping of deer from a CWD state? A high fence herd in the area?
Years back pretty much the only movement of CWD positive deer between states was due to deer farms. Now that CWD is found in so many states in the wild, it definitely could have been an out of state hunter unknowingly bringing in a CWD infected carcass and discarding infected deer parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,057 ·
I'm kind of the opposite. I'm not worried about the meat since it is a neurological disease. I have zero intention of eating the sweet breads, brains, or anything like that anyway.
It's not ruled out that it can not be transmitted to Humans- On page 48 of this thread I posted this below on laboratory testing: There is a lot of information in this thread that covers lots of the topics on this disease. I am not going to roll the dice and eat any deer basically in most of the states I hunt anymore without it being tested.

In this crazy world today, if it can jump to laboratory animals, you can't rule out CWD jumping to other animals or humans. No one is "known" to contract the disease to date. I'm not going to take the chance.

Deer disease seen as threat to humans: Experts compare CWD with resilient mad cow virus

By Dave Orrick / St. Paul Pioneer Press on Feb 7, 2019 at 7:44 p.m

Minnesota Rep. Rick Hansen, DFL-South St. Paul, right, shows leftover parts of a deer he killed - the hide, skeleton and hooves - before a hearing Thursday on chronic wasting disease at the Minnesota Capitol in St. Paul. Dave Orrick / St. Paul Pioneer Press
ST. PAUL -

There is growing concern in the scientific and public health community that chronic wasting disease, which is killing deer in Minnesota, Wisconsin and elsewhere, could jump to people some day.

That unsettling news was featured in a hearing at the Minnesota Capitol Thursday, Feb. 7, where a number of experts from the University of Minnesota pressed upon lawmakers that the disease should be treated as a public health issue - a major expansion of its current scope as mostly a wildlife and hunting concern.

The issue is especially pressing for Minnesota, where wildlife officials are tracking the state's largest outbreak of CWD to date in deer in the southeast portion of the state.

No person is known to have gotten sick from eating or handling a CWD-infected deer.

But scientists have always been wary of it because the disease is spread via extremely hardy protein cells, known as prions, making it similar to mad cow disease, which did jump from cows to people, where it is also fatal and without a cure.

Michael Osterholm, director for the University of Minnesota's Center for Infectious Disease and Research Prevention who sat on a panel of experts tracking the emergence of mad cow disease, or BSE, decades ago, told lawmakers this:

"It is my best professional judgment based on my public health experience and the risk of BSE transmission to humans in the 1980s and 1990s and my extensive review and evaluation of laboratory research studies … that it is probable that human cases of CWD associated with the consumption of contaminated meat will be documented in the years ahead. It is possible that number of human cases will be substantial and will not be isolated events."

He noted that for years, many in the public health and beef industry did not believe mad cow disease could infect people. In 1996, researchers confirmed that BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) can infect people as variant known as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

Why concern is growing
More than a year ago, Canadian researchers publicly presented initial findings that some primates - macaque monkeys - in a laboratory were fed CWD-infected meat and developed neurological disorders. The results have yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, but the findings sparked enough concern in Canada for the nation's food safety agency to issue an advisory. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization recommend against eating CWD-infected deer, but without anything conclusive, wildlife agencies throughout America say the decision is a personal choice, and some hunters do eat the meat.


Adding to the concern is this: The prions are nearly indestructible, capable of withstanding temperatures well above 1,000 degrees - and unlike viruses, CWD prions remain viable in the wild for years, sitting in the dirt, getting sucked up by plant roots and even just resting on inanimate objects.

Peter Larsen, an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota's College of Veterinary Medicine, told lawmakers of a research project where a CWD-exposed rock was placed in a cage with hamsters - and they became infected.

"If I were to model contamination, the closest thing I can think of is it would be similar to modeling radioactive material," Larsen said.

More questions than answers
One of the problems, Larsen and other experts said Thursday, is that much is unknown about CWD.

Among the questions:

• How much of a "dose" will infect?

• Where do deer actually contract it - saliva, feces, food, dirt?

• What happens to food-processing equipment that is exposed to a CWD-infected deer?

"We just don't have tests for that," said Jeremy Schefers, an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota's Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory - the only place in Minnesota where any CWD tests can be done. Those tests can only be done on brains, certain nodes and a few other parts of deer, and it takes days, Schefers said.

Portable testing proposed
Schefers and Larsen are part of a team proposing to develop a new testing device that can be used on live or dead animals and give results in minutes or hours, not days.

The team, which also includes nanotechnology experts, is asking lawmakers for $1.8 million to embark on the project.

Currently, wildlife officials believe only about 1 percent of the deer in Fillmore County are infected. However, in Wisconsin, where the disease has become endemic in many areas, infection rates are believed to have reached 35 percent in some deer populations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,058 ·
Years back pretty much the only movement of CWD positive deer between states was due to deer farms. Now that CWD is found in so many states in the wild, it definitely could have been an out of state hunter unknowingly bringing in a CWD infected carcass and discarding infected deer parts.
It's possible- but my understanding is there was some monitoring in that area of Ohio due to Southern Michigan having positive cases of CWD the last few years. Jackson county for example is just west of Detroit was under CWD Protocol. Some deer or prions associated with those deer may have crossed the border, so to speak.

"CWD in Michigan. Since May 2015 when the first CWD deer was found in Michigan, CWD has been confirmed in free-ranging white-tailed deer in the Lower Peninsula from Clinton, Ionia, Ingham, Jackson, Kent, Gratiot, Eaton, and Montcalm counties."
 
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Dhuntr56, thank you for sharing and I understand the threat. I'm not taking it lightly either so I hope it didn't come across that way.

I'm not here to argue with scientists or anyone else more versed than me. However, there is no way someone hasn't eaten a a deer infected that didn't show signs. So with that in mind, no one has gotten CWD from a wild deer in any form of the prions. The likelihood of getting it is extremely small.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,060 ·
I'm glad you are reading up on the information. Keep in mind we have flu cases and other illnesses and deaths today being reported as Covid 19. Just because we haven't had any "known" cases of human disorders or deaths due to CWD, it doesn't mean we haven't had any.

We all make our own decisions. The information provided is to inform and help understand what the issue is and making informed decisions then can be made by readers. That is the purpose of this information, to educate and understand. Then it's up to each individual on how they want to approach. I have learned enough over the years that for me, testing is the way I am going to help reduce the possibility of transmission.

I know others have tested deer voluntarily before the 1st case was reported. The question for me, at my stage of my life, comes down to is "all of this" worth it?
 
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