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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone plant these in Ohio? I have heard they are great at attracting deer and produce some decent tonnage!
 

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My dad has several of them.

I go there every fall to collect them to roast some over a fire, and never really saw any deer sign around the trees. Maybe because he has a large garden and orchard as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My dad has several of them.

I go there every fall to collect them to roast some over a fire, and never really saw any deer sign around the trees. Maybe because he has a large garden and orchard as well.
thats interesting, I am sure in the SE part of the state they may hold much more attractive then near agriculture areas.
 

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thats interesting, I am sure in the SE part of the state they may hold much more attractive then near agriculture areas.
Could be, I have seen the squirrels get into the chestnuts quite a bit. I am sure the orchard close by probably affects their use as a preferred food choice. If I remember to do this, I'll put a camera up this fall and see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Could be, I have seen the squirrels get into the chestnuts quite a bit. I am sure the orchard close by probably affects their use as a preferred food choice. If I remember to do this, I'll put a camera up this fall and see.
Yea it is interesting, I have just read so much about the trees being a huge draw for the deer on other sites. I am suprised no one else has any input!
 

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There are 3 trees where I hunt. next to soybeans or corn. I doubt the deer want to bother with the casings over the nuts. these trees are about 25 years old and not sure which chestnuts they are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are 3 trees where I hunt. next to soybeans or corn. I doubt the deer want to bother with the casings over the nuts. these trees are about 25 years old and not sure which chestnuts they are.
I totally agree, where I posted early you can see where I said that deer in areas of less agriculture will be much more interested in them!
 

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The American Chestnut trees in the 1800's made up 40 to 50% of the tree's in Ohio. Most of the furniture in that time period was made of the chestnut tree.

Yes it is a huge draw to all animals that feast on acorns.. The blight which was brought over from across the sea's killed most of them. There are severel crosses out the that still retain thee american chestnut size and growth.. One is in florida I think it is the dunsten cheastnut... I think. most out there will start producing at 5 years. There is an american cheastnut society if you choise to join. They are fairly active.I think there are some people from Ohio university that are apart of it.. Shawnee state forest has some stands of them as does an Island somewhere up north that were not affected by the blight..

When they drop the deer will run to them. Unlike the acorn they don't taste bitter... If you have property that you can plant an acre or two I would. It doesn't matter what kind the asian ones don't get as that as the native American Chestnut does... Ag. area or not they will leave an area faster for a stand of chestnuts yhen they leave for acorns.

I just don't see how the Indians walked barefoot with all the husk on the ground...LOL

I am a Chestnut FAN.....
 

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I've got between 50 and 75 planted on my property, all chinese crosses or pure chinese. They are just starting to produce nuts, some are 10 years old and most are 5 years old or less. In my experience the deer love them and will pass up everything else to get to them. I just bought seven more large trees that will produce either this year or next.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Very interesting, I do not have to many areas, to plant them, but I could pop in areas of ten here and ten there, I dont think I would have an area to pop in 50 all next to each other, do you think this would still create a draw?


What about after getting a timber cut if you went in and planted some of these trees they would be ahead of the new growth, and possibly be a great sanctuary area for the deer, when the thicket grows in?
 

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I dont know how close you are But the Switzerland Co. Indiana is having a workshop on Chesnut trees at their conservation Breakfast The 14th of Apr
 

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The American Chestnut trees in the 1800's made up 40 to 50% of the tree's in Ohio. Most of the furniture in that time period was made of the chestnut tree.

Yes it is a huge draw to all animals that feast on acorns.. The blight which was brought over from across the sea's killed most of them. There are severel crosses out the that still retain thee american chestnut size and growth.. One is in florida I think it is the dunsten cheastnut... I think. most out there will start producing at 5 years. There is an american cheastnut society if you choise to join. They are fairly active.I think there are some people from Ohio university that are apart of it.. Shawnee state forest has some stands of them as does an Island somewhere up north that were not affected by the blight..

When they drop the deer will run to them. Unlike the acorn they don't taste bitter... If you have property that you can plant an acre or two I would. It doesn't matter what kind the asian ones don't get as that as the native American Chestnut does... Ag. area or not they will leave an area faster for a stand of chestnuts yhen they leave for acorns.

I just don't see how the Indians walked barefoot with all the husk on the ground...LOL

I am a Chestnut FAN.....
Excellent post! A+++

Ever been through the Hayes Museum in Fremont, Ohio. Much of the house is trimmed out in the wood, but never finished in it because the supply stopped due to a disease.
 

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I dont know how close you are But the Switzerland Co. Indiana is having a workshop on Chesnut trees at their conservation Breakfast The 14th of Apr
I am not that close, I know it is over but if I had the time and it was a little closer I would of went. I like chestnut trees and would like to be part of the reintroduction of the trees. I get and up date of the cheastnut foundation on face book whan ever they post info...

Thank's for the A+++ I really dig the cheastnut tree

I just see the blight as the small pox's of the tree kingdom... All do to the import export thing. Importing disease's/invasive species seems to be what we do.
 

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I am not that close, I know it is over but if I had the time and it was a little closer I would of went. I like chestnut trees and would like to be part of the reintroduction of the trees. I get and up date of the cheastnut foundation on face book whan ever they post info...

Thank's for the A+++ I really dig the cheastnut tree

I just see the blight as the small pox's of the tree kingdom... All do to the import export thing. Importing disease's/invasive species seems to be what we do.
Never worked with the wood but the trim in the Hayes is beautiful. The former President used up all he could find and he was home grown. :) Like most things we abuse our resources until government regulates and it does so because of the infringement on others personal freedom. In the end we all lose. "It's mine to take because I'm free to do so" freedom calls a lie. Small pox was brought on because of the same reasons.

In one case I remember a truce was struck between the British and French forces during a battle, each having their respective Native American counter parts. The British held up in a fort, lost the battle and a deal was struck allowing them to return to England with the promise that they would never return. As they marched out of the fort the French N.A. attacked and killed many even though they had been apart of the agreement. After the slaughter they entered the fort, dug up the dead and scalped them too taking their trophy's back to their villages to celebrate. Little did they know that the dead they dug up had died of small pox. They killed their own people they just didn't know it. That too was home grown.

I recently built some cabinets out of elm, that was some hard wood to finish. I think Chesnuts the same.
You earned the A+++
 
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