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Utah just joined Arizona and Nevada in the trail cam ban trying to help even the playing field in Big Game Wildlife Resources. Thermal Imaging is also in the ban along with selling Pictures and coordinates. See below-


UTAH WILDLIFE BOARD BANS TRAIL CAMERA USAGE FOR BIG GAME HUNTING



Photo credit: Brady Miller
This week, the Utah Wildlife Board moved forward with restricting the use of trail cameras by a 4:3 vote and other hunting-related technology for taking or aiding in the take of big game. The change coincides with HB 295, which was passed by the Utah Legislature effective May 5, 2021, and instructs the wildlife board “to make some rules governing the use of trail cameras in hunting,” according to a press release.

While the majority of the 14,000+ hunters surveyed about the new rule opposed the use of transmitting trail cameras for hunting, the wildlife board opted to go a step further with prohibiting ALL trail cameras (both non-handheld transmitting and non-transmitting devises) between July 31 and Dec. 31. This new rule also applies to private landowners.

Upon approval of this new rule, the sale or purchase trail camera footage or data for this same purpose is also restricted. Further, other hunting-related technologies like night vision, thermal imaging, infrared imaging and other electronic devices that “enhance the visible and non-visible light spectrum” are now prohibited in Utah 48 hours prior to any big game hunt opener and during mountain lion and bear seasons.

Note that the new restrictions do not impact anyone using trail cameras to gather information for educational purposes, private landowners using them for security purposes or to monitor agricultural operations or cities in the Urban Deer Program. It also does not apply to government usages of trail cameras.


and.....

By Dan Pickar- The time has come in the state of Utah. Yesterday, January 4th, the Utah Wildlife Board met and were set to vote on whether or not trail cams should be outlawed on public land. Due to a split vote of the board, the chairman cast the deciding vote to ban all trail cameras for the use of hunting on public and private land from July 31st to December 31st beginning in 2022. The provision stated that private landowners can still use trail cams to monitor their property but they can’t use it for the intention of hunting. This vote follows suit with other states out West banning trail cameras during hunting season, namely Arizona and Nevada. This vote came after a survey was sent out to more than 9,000 license holders to see what they thought; 57% never used a trail camera and around half thought that they should be illegal. Around two thirds of the respondents thought that wireless transmitting trail cameras should be illegal.
This ruling also makes it illegal for outfits to sell trail camera photos with date and locations for animals to the highest bidder. This issue has popped up the past couple of years where we have been seeing people capturing trail camera images and selling the coordinates to hunters. The public survey showed strong support for that to be illegal.
Thermal imaging devices were also made illegal during hunting season and they cannot be used two days before hunting season opens and two days after hunting season closes. You can’t use thermal imaging devices to recover an animal you shot either.
 
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This is a dumb move. To many hunters, a trail cam photo is the next best thing to harvesting the animal. Hunting is a dying sport and this only exacerbates the problem.
I agree. It’s even more
Important than harvesting imo.
 

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People love to talk about methods, weapons and tech.....there's a bunch on here who harp on everything "they" don't like.....its all fuel for the anti hunting movement.....noone forces anyone to use certain implements...people just complain to complain...
 

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People love to talk about methods, weapons and tech.....there's a bunch on here who harp on everything "they" don't like.....its all fuel for the anti hunting movement.....noone forces anyone to use certain implements...people just complain to complain...
At first glance, Utah has hardly any people, and apparently they don't need any commerce. The private landowners can function as before with this rule. So that makes the private landowners the advocates of this rule. Competition must be tough when it's your living.
 

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Utah just joined Arizona and Nevada in the trail cam ban trying to help even the playing field in Big Game Wildlife Resources. Thermal Imaging is also in the ban along with selling Pictures and coordinates. See below-


UTAH WILDLIFE BOARD BANS TRAIL CAMERA USAGE FOR BIG GAME HUNTING



Photo credit: Brady Miller
This week, the Utah Wildlife Board moved forward with restricting the use of trail cameras by a 4:3 vote and other hunting-related technology for taking or aiding in the take of big game. The change coincides with HB 295, which was passed by the Utah Legislature effective May 5, 2021, and instructs the wildlife board “to make some rules governing the use of trail cameras in hunting,” according to a press release.

While the majority of the 14,000+ hunters surveyed about the new rule opposed the use of transmitting trail cameras for hunting, the wildlife board opted to go a step further with prohibiting ALL trail cameras (both non-handheld transmitting and non-transmitting devises) between July 31 and Dec. 31. This new rule also applies to private landowners.

Upon approval of this new rule, the sale or purchase trail camera footage or data for this same purpose is also restricted. Further, other hunting-related technologies like night vision, thermal imaging, infrared imaging and other electronic devices that “enhance the visible and non-visible light spectrum” are now prohibited in Utah 48 hours prior to any big game hunt opener and during mountain lion and bear seasons.

Note that the new restrictions do not impact anyone using trail cameras to gather information for educational purposes, private landowners using them for security purposes or to monitor agricultural operations or cities in the Urban Deer Program. It also does not apply to government usages of trail cameras.


and.....

By Dan Pickar- The time has come in the state of Utah. Yesterday, January 4th, the Utah Wildlife Board met and were set to vote on whether or not trail cams should be outlawed on public land. Due to a split vote of the board, the chairman cast the deciding vote to ban all trail cameras for the use of hunting on public and private land from July 31st to December 31st beginning in 2022. The provision stated that private landowners can still use trail cams to monitor their property but they can’t use it for the intention of hunting. This vote follows suit with other states out West banning trail cameras during hunting season, namely Arizona and Nevada. This vote came after a survey was sent out to more than 9,000 license holders to see what they thought; 57% never used a trail camera and around half thought that they should be illegal. Around two thirds of the respondents thought that wireless transmitting trail cameras should be illegal.
This ruling also makes it illegal for outfits to sell trail camera photos with date and locations for animals to the highest bidder. This issue has popped up the past couple of years where we have been seeing people capturing trail camera images and selling the coordinates to hunters. The public survey showed strong support for that to be illegal.
Thermal imaging devices were also made illegal during hunting season and they cannot be used two days before hunting season opens and two days after hunting season closes. You can’t use thermal imaging devices to recover an animal you shot either.
That is awesome
Back to the old way is a good thing, now if we can get that in ohio, ban some other things, bring back the old physical check in, we will begin to see a huge gain in quantity and quality period!!!!!!!
 

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That is awesome
Back to the old way is a good thing, now if we can get that in ohio, ban some other things, bring back the old physical check in, we will begin to see a huge gain in quantity and quality period!!!!!!!
I’ve got loads of trail cameras browning, Moultrie, tons of Tactacam cell cameras, will give them up right now to help get the growth to potential back and increased, also bring back physical deer checking, and a few other things, we just had a local hunter gathering recently and the subject of the element of surprise was lost in the trail cameras arrival, also the survival rate for potential growth has been affected, I know people are probably going to start bashing me again, but the hunter who know how awesome it was when the surprise and survival elements were strong prior to technology invasions, they know the real feeling of the hunt.
Now go ahead and start your Redarrow7 bashing’s
Those who like to only believe in their own opinions only.
Redarrow7
 

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I've had (too many to count) game cameras over the years. Thousands of pics and still counting. I remember loading 35mm film into them. It's exciting to know what's walking my property. I just counted 27 "retired" cameras in a box in my basement. I've got 2 cams locked and loaded taking pics right now. Do they offer an advantage in the hunting community? This can be argued for sure. I can take them or leave them. Good for Utah. I would have no problem with Ohio "going back to the way it was." ;)
 

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The genie is out of the bottle.
 

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From what I've read, the issues with trail cams out west are not applicable to trail cams in Ohio (and Mid West and really everywhere but out west).
 

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I’ve got loads of trail cameras browning, Moultrie, tons of Tactacam cell cameras, will give them up right now to help get the growth to potential back and increased, also bring back physical deer checking, and a few other things, we just had a local hunter gathering recently and the subject of the element of surprise was lost in the trail cameras arrival, also the survival rate for potential growth has been affected, I know people are probably going to start bashing me again, but the hunter who know how awesome it was when the surprise and survival elements were strong prior to technology invasions, they know the real feeling of the hunt.
Now go ahead and start your Redarrow7 bashing’s
Those who like to only believe in their own opinions only.
Redarrow7
The level of surprise is tremendous for sure. But I am always surprised to see them when I am in the sit on my old man with technology sits. It is still a rare event.
 

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The level of surprise is tremendous for sure. But I am always surprised to see them when I am in the sit on my old man with technology sits. It is still a rare event.
Understand that, I do like watching them on my mock scrapes, but as many cameras as I own, I would be willing to give them up knowing the benefits to the survival rate increase, and yes I would somewhat miss the excitement of seeing what was on my cameras, but replaced by that monster showing up at my stand site when least expecting him, and not knowing he was on my property would maybe make up for the sacrifice.
Just a thought—— a lot to think about when we have gotten so use to technology, I remember a day when I got one of those clock and string devices you put on trail crossings to get an idea of what time the deer where crossing——fast forward to now my property is full of Tactacam cell cameras, but I would still be willing to give them up knowing the extra growth opertunities that would follow
Just a thought to ponder.
 

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I've had (too many to count) game cameras over the years. Thousands of pics and still counting. I remember loading 35mm film into them. It's exciting to know what's walking my property. I just counted 27 "retired" cameras in a box in my basement. I've got 2 cams locked and loaded taking pics right now. Do they offer an advantage in the hunting community? This can be argued for sure. I can take them or leave them. Good for Utah. I would have no problem with Ohio "going back to the way it was." ;)
I like your views and jethro’s views
I’m from the old school personally
Alan Altizer—The Wenzel boys ETC.
 

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Understand that, I do like watching them on my mock scrapes, but as many cameras as I own, I would be willing to give them up knowing the benefits to the survival rate increase, and yes I would somewhat miss the excitement of seeing what was on my cameras, but replaced by that monster showing up at my stand site when least expecting him, and not knowing he was on my property would maybe make up for the sacrifice.
Just a thought—— a lot to think about when we have gotten so use to technology, I remember a day when I got one of those clock and string devices you put on trail crossings to get an idea of what time the deer where crossing——fast forward to now my property is full of Tactacam cell cameras, but I would still be willing to give them up knowing the extra growth opertunities that would follow
Just a thought to ponder.
I hear ya. My area (and as you have indicated for yours as well) is such that the opportunity is not limited to just me even given the technology. Private owned hunting regions are as susceptible as public. Maybe more sometimes. More to the pressure in our areas and whether the area manages itself. 400-600 acres holds a bunch in timbered regions. When 12 guys are hitting it, we need to manage with info. Cams are a huge part of that.
 

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Technology is not of itself a problem or always an ethical consideration.
Hunters incorporating technology in the hunting process, can be a problem....from trail cams to dog trackers.
All, and much more, being rooted in a hunter's competitive drive and the crying need for a good balance sheet...decisions then naturally follow.
Decisions often justified by claims of benefits to hunter numbers or, perhaps, to the health of someone's own preferred game....understandable on the surface but clearly a one-way haul road given a deeper look.

To me, competition has over-shadowed honest excitement and balance sheets have obscured all in the woods but ME.
Each of which has contributed it's own too often unrecognized share in the decline in hunter numbers, along with hunters boarding the next complaint train and hoping for shared hatred to enable change, of course....dang A-mish, every one of dem.
Join ME against an "X" rather than for an "X" is evermore the sad call.

Hunters choosing to use technology is not the fault of technology.
Hunters are where the real problem sits today.
And, where the best answer lives.

👍 to Utah, if they are addressing their issues of concern.
 

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I’ve got loads of trail cameras browning, Moultrie, tons of Tactacam cell cameras, will give them up right now to help get the growth to potential back and increased, also bring back physical deer checking, and a few other things, we just had a local hunter gathering recently and the subject of the element of surprise was lost in the trail cameras arrival, also the survival rate for potential growth has been affected, I know people are probably going to start bashing me again, but the hunter who know how awesome it was when the surprise and survival elements were strong prior to technology invasions, they know the real feeling of the hunt.
Now go ahead and start your Redarrow7 bashing’s
Those who like to only believe in their own opinions only.
Redarrow7
i would argue survival rate for potential growth has only improved with trail cam use. For instance, I’m a whole lot more likely to pass on a shot at a 125” 3 year old buck if I know a 145” 5 year old is wandering around. Prior to trail cams, I would have shot the 125 and never knew the 145 existed.

As has already been said; use the tactics you prefer. Just because you can use trail cams doesn’t make it mandatory. Similarly to how not everyone had to rush out to buy a rifle once they became legal.
 

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Once again the anti killing hunters are trying to have their way. I’m not going down the rabbit hole with the same people again. I’ve been here too long to care and know I won’t change your mind. Just remember the majority of Utah are people who voted for Romney and think a guy named Joseph Smith looked into a hat and talked to god. Take that fwiw. :). There is no other group like hunters who try to impose their will onto their fellow hunters. “The good ole days” weren’t all that great.
 
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i would argue survival rate for potential growth has only improved with trail cam use. For instance, I’m a whole lot more likely to pass on a shot at a 125” 3 year old buck if I know a 145” 5 year old is wandering around. Prior to trail cams, I would have shot the 125 and never knew the 145 existed.

As has already been said; use the tactics you prefer. Just because you can use trail cams doesn’t make it mandatory. Similarly to how not everyone had to rush out to buy a rifle once they became legal.
WE HAVE A WINNER!!
 
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That is awesome
Back to the old way is a good thing, now if we can get that in ohio, ban some other things, bring back the old physical check in, we will begin to see a huge gain in quantity and quality period!!!!!!!
What else needs banned?
 
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