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I have read Greg Millers book and it was a great read. What are some of your tactics for hunting the big forest with lots of hills?
 

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i like ridge tops . maybe acorn trees. love to find shelf lines across hilly terrain. also finding multiple trails in close distance or an intersection of trails
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dang tristan you got some real good guys in camp that can help with that question...i definately been having a big ear lately...every year i'm amazed even more at how these guys keep finding the big boys...:biggrin:
 

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I have read the book but even after doing so I don't have a lot more strategies. There really isn't much elevation to the big woods in the National forest by us. My biggest thing is looking for areas that consistently produce acorns and finding edges near those areas. Also clear cuts either by private individual around the national forest or by companies in the national forest are great places to start.
 

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I have read the book but even after doing so I don't have a lot more strategies. There really isn't much elevation to the big woods in the National forest by us. My biggest thing is looking for areas that consistently produce acorns and finding edges near those areas. Also clear cuts either by private individual around the national forest or by companies in the national forest are great places to start.
in our area clearcuts usually mean powerlines up to 100 yds.wide and a lot of miles of it...:biggrin:
 

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I just like to read the threads on strategies. One guy on another forum made a good point. When u are hunting the big woods eliminate where the deer are not going to be first. Expecially when hunting thousands of acres of forest. Lots of people spend there time on big chunks of land and never see any deer.
 

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where we hunt...i've never been to a spot where i never seen a deer...they are very evenly distributed...i could hunt 10 times in a spot and see nothing...go back a month later and see deer all the time...dont mistake that...i do have favorite spots but every year i find a new favorite spot...i like millers book...he is talking about areas much bigger and remote than the wayne we hunt...those deer are way out in the middle of nowhere where theres no private land...deer on the wnf is in peoples backyards during the night...also you can use vehichles on much of the areas he hunts...not so on the wnf...i guess in a way though the twnshp roads on the wnf is a bit like that...its a good book...i like the way he thinks...a lot like i have...so i can really relate to what he says...:D
 

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At the DBNF I think u will have to use the elimination technique. It is just much more rugged than most are used to.
 

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I hunt more in farmland that is fairly flat these days. But back when I hunted mostly Athens county, I keyed on saddles between feed and bed areas. If the area gets heavy pressure, thick cover close by is a plus.
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I hunt more in farmland that is fairly flat these days. But back when I hunted mostly Athens county, I keyed on saddles between feed and bed areas. If the area gets heavy pressure, thick cover close by is a plus.
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I agree, saddles just under ridge tops are great as well. When pressure gets heavy (gun season) I usually hunt low in the creek bottom thickets.
 

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At the DBNF I think u will have to use the elimination technique. It is just much more rugged than most are used to.
yup some of that steep stuff is too steep for the deers...so illiminate that...theres gotta be travel routes thru that steep stuff...i mean cliff steep...:biggrin:
 

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I hunt more in farmland that is fairly flat these days. But back when I hunted mostly Athens county, I keyed on saddles between feed and bed areas. If the area gets heavy pressure, thick cover close by is a plus.
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In the WNF, its very difficult to identify bedding areas and there are so many oaks that the deer can simply feed almost anywhere. The only area I've found that seems to be a consistent bedding area are the power line cuts with the tall grass. Other than that, it's all mature hardwoods and the deer can be laying anywhere - they seem to like bedding next to downed trees too.
 

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Many times the deer are like us. Instead of climbing up a steep hill to get across a ridge, they will make use of a saddle to cross. I would look for several trails converging and heading to a saddle. Then take into consideration prevailing wind direction and thermals to determine exact stand placement.
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Still trying to figure it out.....:confused:.....??? Can be some of the most difficult yet satisfying hunting. Add together the lack of obvious funnels, widespread food and cover and the fact that deer bed where every they please and it can be difficult. I've had to completely change the way I go about my scouting, hunting the big woods has humbled this boy. Every time I head out to scout with topo in hand, it never fails, I'll run into a wall which will prevent me from hunting what appears to be a great spot on the map. Last season I found what appeared to be a great saddle in the Shawnee. Burned some boot leather to hike the 2 miles in and found some great sign leading from a bench below up to the saddle, thought I had found the "spot". Never occured to me the power of a "light" breeze in conjunction with the morning thermals. Sitting in the lowest spot on the ridgeline above a deep holler, I might as well been sitting in a wind tunnel. Couldn't stand it too long as I wasn't dressed for it. I'll never forget the feeling when i reached the top of the hill only a hundred yards or so from where I was hunting and there was no wind at all, simple slow me thought, huh the wind has died down so I'll go back and hunt, wrong........:banghead3:

The serenity and beauty of it keeps me going back, that and the fact that I'm stubborn.

I understand the concept of eliminating uproductive areas but don't fully grasp how to apply it. Anyone care to offer advice?
 
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