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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. I'm thinking in getting a second rifle for hunting deer/elk/hog(and maybe moose) out of the state. I was wondering if you guys could recommend me a good caliber that might satisfy most of the hunting scenarios (medium/big game). I know different states have different regulations, I'm pretty sure my 350 Legend will help in some states, but want something for the others that are not as restrictive. Any input/recommendation is appreciated!
 

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There are a lot of good calibers for what your looking for and different people will have different opinions.

300 win mag. I have shot pronghorn, hog and deer with mine through the lungs and all were deed right there. I like lung shots for less meat damage then shoulder shots.

30-06 If you take shoulder shots or want less kick then the 300. The 300 kicks a little more and some people can start to flinch.

You can do a muzzle brake on the 300 for less kick but then it makes your rifle a lot louder.

Both calibers will work for elk and moose too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There are a lot of good calibers for what your looking for and different people will have different opinions.

300 win mag. I have shot pronghorn, hog and deer with mine through the lungs and all were deed right there. I like lung shots for less meat damage then shoulder shots.

30-06 If you take shoulder shots or want less kick then the 300. The 300 kicks a little more and some people can start to flinch.

You can do a muzzle brake on the 300 for less kick but then it makes your rifle a lot louder.

Both calibers will work for elk and moose too.
The muzzle brake sounds like a good alternative, do you know about how much it reduces the kick, like half, a third?
 

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I agree with either a 30.06 or a .300. I have 1 of each in a Rem 700 & they are a really great rifle.
 
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Can't go wrong with a 300 WM or a 7mm Magnum. Both will do the job flawlessly, depending on how good you can place the shot.7 Mag has a little less recoil than the 300WM.
 

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Can't go wrong with any of the above IMHO . I have taken a lot of large game with the 30/06 . And my wife has taken many with a 7mm08 . .280 is a nice round also .
 

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Muzzle brakes are usually 50%. Some guns new will have muzzle breaks or at least threaded barrels so you can add an aftermarket break. Trying different guns before buying is good advice. I looked up the kick of your 350 legend and it's about 9 pounds and the 300 is about 26 depending on the load. The 30 06 and 7 mm were 18 to 23 depending on the load.
 

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I was exactly where you are this time last year, shooting a 350 Legend but being able to use a necked cartidge in MO. I was set on the 7mm-08 after many conversations with Catchdog but waited until after MO deer season since I have a 30-06 that my dad built back in the 60's. The gun started having issues during my hunt in MO, the firing pin dropped when I closed the bolt, so I decided it was definitely time for a new gun (I still need to get it to a gunsmith). As I said I was set on the 7mm-08.....until the run on ammo. I couldn't find 7mm-08 anywhere but I could still find .308 and that sealed the deal for me. I got a Ruger American in .308 and the thing is a tack driver.

As far are recoil goes, you're going to have more kick from almost anything compared to the 350 Legend. I found the .308 to be perfectly fine, I'm 5'8" and around 170lbs so I'm not a Goliath of a guy. I could handle my 30-06 just fine as well but it's a HEAVY gun, tipping the scales at 10lbs which is another reason I picked up the Ruger American, I'm around 7.5lbs scoped out. That 2.5lbs will make a big difference in the woods. Pick the right bullet as well and put the shot where it counts, everything will be fine after that.

Also be sure to get trigger time on the range and with snap caps, makes a big difference.
 

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I have hunted out West and Canada since the 90's. I have several Big Game Rifle calibers from 270 to 7mm Weatherby Magnum. I have killed most of my game out west with the 30.06 Caliber. It's a good overall cartridge with the necessary down range energy for most all of the Big Game in North America. Most of my rifles are under 8-9lbs with a scope except for my 7mm STW. Most of the calibers above have harvested Big Game out West. I have 4 different 30.06 Rifles from different Manufacturers and all shoot well. My two Favorites is my Winchester Model 70 and Browning Gold Medallion.

My favorite bullet weights have been 150 to 180 grain for most big game with the heavier weights to be used on larger game like Elk and Moose.

I would go to a hand full of stores that carry a good selection of guns. handle as many as you can and get the one that fits you best and feels good in your hands. Make sure you allocate the funds you need for a reliable rifle and then don't skimp on the optics as well. It's critical you buy a quality scope since many of your potential shots out West is in open country and 200 yard+ shot opportunities exist regularly. Quality, Clear defined glass is very important, especially in low light situations that happen in early morning/late evening hunts at long ranges. I have harvested several over 200 yards with a few in the 400+ yard range as well.

Once you get the gun, range time is required to learn how to shoot it, and then learn it's capabilities as well as fine tuning it. Don't plan on shooting only1-2 times and think all is good, plan on many trips and at many different ranges so you can be proficient in making the shot. You may get only one opportunity, and you need to make it count.

Good Luck-
 

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Some good advice has been posted . One more thing about range time is to get off the bench rest and practice in hunting positions . Not many hunts have a bench rest out there for you . Practice standing with and without shooting sticks . Also prone , sitting , knelling and using a tree as a rest and any other thing you can think of that could come up in a hunt . You need to practice with the rifle your going to hunt with . But you can also do a lot of practice with a .22 or .17 HMR ; A good shooting .22 is a great practice tool . It's cheap to shoot and you can shoot a ton with out getting a sore shoulder and developing a flinch .
 

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Hi everyone. I'm thinking in getting a second rifle for hunting deer/elk/hog(and maybe moose) out of the state. I was wondering if you guys could recommend me a good caliber that might satisfy most of the hunting scenarios (medium/big game). I know different states have different regulations, I'm pretty sure my 350 Legend will help in some states, but want something for the others that are not as restrictive. Any input/recommendation is appreciated!
I'd lean towards a 30 caliber. There are lots of 30 caliber cartridges to choose from. I have a 300 Winchester Magnum and a 308 Winchester. Same caliber but I shoot different type and grain bullets from each from very different types of rifles. Needless to say the two rifles have very different purposes.
 
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