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2018 Out of State Application Deadlines!!

Discussion in 'Out of State Hunts' started by Deehntr56, Dec 24, 2017.

  1. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    2018 Out of State Hunt Application Dates.

    Here we go with another year of applications and preference points for out of state and Western United States hunts- I will make another attempt for Shiras Moose this year. With a lot of Luck and 15 preference points saved up for the coveted Moose tag, maybe my turn will come.

    Over the course of the next week or so(as time permits), I will be posting the Application deadlines for various states and Big Game Species for 2018. I will post the application dates by state and due dates for species like I have done in the past. I will list everything I can find and dig up.

    I will try to provide as much information as possible to help "guide" you in the right direction. There are others here that can do the same-just ask. ;) Please visit the "How To" thread and other threads in the Out of State Forum for guidance and help.

    Wyoming is one of the 1st up with their Application process starting soon with the site open on 1.2.2018 to submit-
    • 2018 applications open
    • 8 am MST 1/2/2018
    https://wgfd.wyo.gov/Events/Application-Periods-Open

    Wyoming Non-Resident ELK LICENSE DUE 1.31.18!!!!

    https://wgfd.wyo.gov/Events/Application-Deadline-Nonresident-Elk

    Stay Tuned and Good luck drawing this coming year.

    Merry Christmas!
     
  2. Following, ,,Thanks!

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
     
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  3. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Hunting application dates are somewhat behind being publicized in some states, so as I am able to get them I will begin posting the states and due dates. In the interim, I'll get some contact information posted-

    1. State- Telephone- Websites

      Arizona 602-942-3000 Arizona Game and Fish Department: azgfd.gov

      Colorado 303-297-1192 Colorado Parks and Wildlife

      Idaho 208-334-3700 Idaho Fish and Game - Home Page.

      Kentucky- http://fw.ky.gov/Pages/default.aspx

      Maine 207-287-8000 Maine IF&W

      Montana 406-444-2950 Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

      Nebraska- http://outdoornebraska.gov/huntingseasons/

      Nevada 775-688-1500 http://www.ndow.org/

      New Hampshire 603-271-2461 http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/

      New Mexico 505-476-8000 http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/

      Oregon 503-947-6100 http://www.dfw.state.or.us/

      South Dakota- http://gfp.sd.gov/

      Utah 801-538-4700 http://wildlife.utah.gov/

      Vermont 802-241-3700 http://www.vtfishandwildlife.com/

      Washington 360-902-2464 https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/

      Wyoming 307-777-4600 https://wgfd.wyo.gov/
     
  4. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    1. Great information on planning your hunts- Wyoming,Colorado and others walk you step by step thru the process if needed- some others do as well.

      I'll add others as they become available-See Links below;

      Wyoming-
      https://wgfd.wyo.gov/hunting/hunt-planner

      Colorado-
      http://cpw.state.co.us/search/Pages/results.aspx?k=hunt planner

      http://cpw.state.co.us/documents/hunting/huntered/huntplanner.pdf

      Kansas-

      http://ksoutdoors.com/Hunting/Big-Game-Information

      Utah-
      https://wildlife.utah.gov/maps-first-page.html
     
  5. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Some interesting data here that will help to understand how much public land for hunting states have. The link at the bottom has a lot of other information about what is available by state and the break down as well-

    Note: I will have most of the application due dates in by tomorrow night......

    The Western States have Most of the Public Hunting Land
    I knew most of the public land was in the Western States and Alaska, but look at the totals for the Top 12 States (all Western States; Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington & Wyoming) compared to the Remaining 38 States. To start with, the total land area of the Top 11 States plus Alaska are almost as large as the rest of the 38 states combined (49.3% of the total). Without Alaska, the Top 11 states make up 33% of the total land area of the U.S.


    [​IMG]


    85% of all USFS lands and 99.9% of BLM land are found in the Western States (includes AK).

    85% of all USFS lands and 99.9% of BLM land are found in the Top 12 states. 73.5% of USFS lands and 70.3% of BLM lands are found in the Top 11 states excluding Alaska. The majority of State owned lands are also found in the West. 79.5% of state lands are in the Top 12 states.

    89% of combined public lands that I assume to be available to public hunting are found in the Top 12 states and even with out Alaska, the Top 11 states have 57.3% the total land available for public hunting. According to my calculations, 31% of the the total U.S. land area is available for public hunting, 50.2% of the total area is in the Top 12 states and 48% of the Top 11 States. Only 6% of the total land area of the remaining 38 states is available for public hunting.

    The hunt-able acres per person is 2.1 acres nationwide, with 7.9 acres per person in the Top 12 States and 5.2 acres the Top 11 States. Less than 1/3 acre (0.3 acres) is available per hunter in the remaining 38 states.

    Ignoring Alaska for the moment, based on the amount of Public land, especially USFS lands and low populations, states like Wyoming, Montana and Idaho have higher ratios of land to hunt per person (55.7,30.4 & 22.2 acres respectively) than popular hunting states like Arizona and Colorado (5.1 acres each). Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Oregon are in the middle with 19.9, 15.3, 12.6 & 9.1 acres respectively). I was surprised that Washington state has only 2 acres of hunt-able public land per person. And then there is California.


    http://www.backcountrychronicles.com/public-hunting-land/
     
  6. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Ok- some are TBD, but most are fairly in.....I'll update as I get new information. Ask questions if needed......I'll post the other Big Game species when I get them done-The BOLD date has been verified by either the states website or other source. No guarantee they stay this way, so don't wait until the last minute to apply and also check the states Wildlife website to verify the due date.


    Mule Deer Application Due Dates:

    Arizona- June 12th
    California
    -June 2
    Colorado
    - April 3rd(Eastern Plains and North Central areas has some great hunting)
    Idaho- June 5th
    Montana
    -March 15th (Deer Combo)
    Nevada- April 16th
    New Mexico
    - March 21st
    South Dakota
    (Special Buck)-April 14th? TBD
    Utah-March 1st-Limited entry and General.
    Wyoming(Special and Regular License)- Due May 31st. (No rut hunting but there is some very good hunting in the Tetons, Sheridan and South West parts of the state. There is some good whitetail hunting during the rut in areas, and the due dates are the same as mule deer. Refer to the application instructions on what areas would be available for both species.
    Wyoming Preference point-for future use due October 31st.

    Whitetail Deer
    Iowa- June 3rd
    Iowa(Pref point). June 3rd
    Kansas
    - April 27th
    South Dakota
    - July 14th- 3 months later than last year?

    Blacktail Deer
    California
    -June 2
    Oregon
    -May 15

    Coues Deer:
    Arizona
    -June 12th


    Pronghorn Antelope

    Wyoming, New Mexico and Arizona are some of the better destinations.

    Arizona-February-13th
    California
    -June 2
    Colorado
    - April 3rd
    Idaho
    -June 5th
    Montana
    - March 15th
    Nevada
    - April 16th
    New Mexico
    -March 21st
    Utah
    -March 1st
    Wyoming
    - (Special and Regular Licenses)-May 31st
    Wyoming Preference points- October 31st.


    Elk Application Deadlines are as follows:
    Arizona
    - February 13
    California
    -(Tuke and Roosevelt)-June 2
    Colorado
    - April 3rd
    Idaho
    - June 5th
    Montana
    - (Elk Combo/Big Game combo)-March 15th due date for both.
    New Mexico- (Guided(Better odds) and unguided) Due March 21st
    Nevada
    - April 16th
    Oregon
    (Roosevelt and Rocky Mountain)- May 15
    Utah
    - March 1st
    Wyoming
    (Special and Regular Licenses)- Due January 31st
    Wyoming preference points for future use- Due October 31st.
    PA
    - Will update when final-Typically August Due Date.
    KY
    - Jan 1-April 30
     
  7. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    and the rest- waiting for some final dates to be published. Don't wait until the last minute, since websites will be busy and will slow down accordingly. Try to get them in early vs later.
    I'll be submitting for Shiras Moose and not sure about others yet. Working on trying to get access in Iowa as well.

    Rocky Mountain Big Horn Sheep:

    Arizona- June 12
    Colorado- April 3rd
    Idaho-April 30th
    Montana- May 1st
    New Mexico-March 21st
    Oregon- May 15th
    Utah- March 1st
    Washington-May 23
    Wyoming-Feb, 28th (Pref. point only due 10/31)

    Desert Bighorn Sheep

    Arizona- June 12th
    California-June 2nd
    Colorado- April 3rd
    Nevada- April 16th
    New Mexico- March 21st
    Texas- December 6th (too late for this year)
    Utah- March 1st

    Dall Sheep
    Alaska-December 15th

    Moose

    Alaska-Dec 15
    Colorado-April 3rd (Shiras Moose)
    Idaho-April 30th
    Maine-April 2(Chances of 10,20,30 apply)
    Montana-May 1st
    New Hampshire-May 25th
    Utah- March 1st
    Vermont- July 12
    Washington- May 23rd
    Wyoming-February 28 (Shiras Moose)
    Wyoming- Preference point only due 10/31


    Mountain Goat

    Alaska-Dec 15th
    Colorado-April 3rd
    Idaho-April 30th
    Montana-May 1st
    Nevada- April 16th
    Utah-March 1st
    Washington-May 23rd
    Wyoming- February 28th

    Bison

    Arizona-June 12th
    Utah-March 1st
    Wyoming- Feb. 28th

    Brown Bear

    Alaska- December 15th

    Caribou
    Alaska- December 15th

    Mountain Lion
    Utah-October 8th

    Oryx and Ibex
    New Mexico-March 15?-TBD

    Turkey-
    Arizona(Gould)- October 9
    Arizoan- Extra Point- June 12
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
  8. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Idaho Mule Deer, Elk and Antelope due dates are entered-

    Wyoming Elk application site opened today.
     
  9. It's that time already isn't it? I doubt I will make it out hunting past the Mississippi this year but I will apply for another PP for elk and go for a bull in 2019
     
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  10. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Wyoming Preference points are going to spike in price this year......just fyi....;)
     
  11. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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  12. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Maine and Vermont Moose due dates have been entered.
     
  13. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Update New Hampshire Moose due date-

    Added Utah Mountain Lion due date-

    Added Arizona Bison to the list and Due date-
     
  14. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Turkey due dates updated-
     
  15. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Kentucky Elk applications are being accepted January 1- April 30, 2018.


    GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE ELK QUOTA HUNT
    • Frequently Asked Questions about the Elk Hunt Drawing
    • Applications go on sale Jan. 1 for the next year’s Kentucky elk quota hunts. Hunters must buy their elk quota hunt applications before midnight Eastern time on April 30. How to apply for the 2017 Elk Hunt Drawing
    • Elk quota hunt applications can only be purchased online. A person who does not have access to the department’s website to apply for any quota hunt may contact the department toll free at 1-800-858-1549 (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) for assistance.
    • Residents and nonresidents are eligible to apply for each of the four permit types (bull or cow firearms, bull or cow archery/crossbow) but can only be drawn for one.
    • Each application costs $10. Only individuals may purchase elk applications, not a party of hunters together.
    • Hunters 15 years of age and younger may apply for a youth-only quota hunt during the same application period as for the regular elk quota hunt drawing.
    • Applicants for the youth-only hunt may also purchase elk applications for the regular elk quota hunts. A youth may not be drawn for the youth-only quota hunt and the regular quota hunt for elk in the same year, and if drawn for the youth-only hunt, will be permanently blocked from applying for the youth-only hunt again.
    • A random computer drawing is held in May to select the drawn hunters. Applicants may check to see if they were drawn here in May.
    • It is the hunter’s responsibility to find a place to hunt in the area they choose or are assigned to hunt. Hunters must get landowner permission to hunt on private land.
    • There is no limit to the number of assistants an elk hunter may take into the field, but only the permit holder is allowed to hunt.
    • Quota elk permits must be purchased prior to hunting.
    • The Levisa Fork LEA encompassing Fishtrap Lake in Pike County is designated as an Active Restoration Area and is off limits to elk hunting.
    • Unless license exempt, hunters drawn for a quota elk permit are required to buy an elk quota hunt permit in addition to an annual hunting license.
    • Including hunters drawn for the 2017 elk season, hunters awarded an elk permit will be blocked from reapplying for three years.
    • Up to three drawn hunters may apply for their LEA choices as a party.
    HOW APPLICANTS ARE DRAWN FOR THE ELK QUOTA HUNT
    Applicants have the opportunity to apply for each of the four different elk permits (antlered firearm, antlered archery/crossbow, antlerless firearm, and antlerless archery/crossbow). This means that a hunter may apply for up to four different elk permits. Under this system, there is a separate applicant pool for each permit type. Some permits have historically received more applications than others; antlered firearm tags have received the most applications annually, followed by antlered archery/crossbow, antlerless firearm, and then antlerless archery/crossbow.

    To account for this difference in popularity between permit types, the elk lottery system has been designed to draw applicants for antlered firearm permits first, antlered archery/crossbow permits second, antlerless firearm permits third, and antlerless archery/crossbow permits fourth. This maximizes the likelihood (odds) that an applicant will draw a more desirable permit, if he/she has applied for multiple permit types. Since a person can receive only one Kentucky elk permit per year, individuals who are drawn from a particular applicant pool are automatically removed from any other applicant pools they may have entered. It is important to note that an applicant can only be drawn from an applicant pool to which they applied. For example, if someone applied only for the antlered firearm permit and was not drawn for that permit, their name would not be automatically placed into any other applicant pool.

    QUOTA HUNTS WITHIN THE ELK ZONE
    The elk zone includes the following 16 counties: Bell, Breathitt, Clay, Floyd, Harlan, Johnson, Knott, Knox, Leslie, Letcher, Magoffin, Martin, McCreary, Perry, Pike and Whitley. Inside this zone, elk may only be taken by hunters drawn for a quota hunt as previously described. All elk hunters must display a department-issued hang tag in their vehicles while hunting.

    HUNTING ZONE DESCRIPTIONS
    The Kentucky elk zone is divided into two types of elk hunting units: Limited Entry Areas (or LEAs) and the At-large Area. Limited Entry Areas were created in areas with relatively large blocks of public access. The primary function of an LEA is to prevent localized overharvest of elk on public access land; KDFWR accomplishes this goal by limiting the number of hunters allowed on LEA areas. Limited Entry Areas are not trophy management zones, and should not be considered better hunting opportunities because of their different status. When choosing a hunting unit, there is no substitute for up-to-date knowledge about the different hunting areas in which you are interested. Explore KDFWR’s elk webpage, review past harvest results from different counties and public hunting areas, talk to someone who has hunted elk in Kentucky, visit the area to scout, and/or interview some of Kentucky's licensed elk guides.

    AVAILABLE ELK PERMITS
    KDFWR offers four types of elk permits: general drawing quota permits, special commission permits, voucher cooperator permits, landowner cooperator permits, and elk restoration permits.

    • General drawing quota permits are available by applying to the Kentucky elk lottery online. Permits are offered for bull firearm, bull archery, cow firearm, and cow archery; individuals may apply separately for each permit type, for a total of 4 possible applications per year. However, individuals can only apply once for each permit type. General drawing quota permits cannot be bought or sold, and hunters have to follow the season requirements for the permit for which they were drawn. The annual deadline to apply for general drawing quota permits is April 30.
    • Special commission permits are available to registered non-profit groups whose focus is on wildlife conservation. A hunter with this permit can hunt during any elk season anywhere they have permission to do so. The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Commission issues 10 of these elk permits per year. Non-profits can sell a permit outright or auction it, but all proceeds must be used for a conservation project in Kentucky. A person who buys a special commission permit must hunt with it; the permit is not transferrable a second time. Names of non-profits receiving the special commission permits are available online at fw.ky.gov.
    • Landowner-cooperator permits are provided to landowners who open their property to public hunting. For each 5,000 acres enrolled in a public hunting agreement with KDFWR, the landowner receives one permit. Landowners may give away or sell these permits. A hunter with the landowner-cooperator permit may hunt during any season. However, that person may only hunt on the public land enrolled in the program. Names of landowners receiving landowner-cooperator permits are available only by making a Kentucky Open Records request to the department.
    • Voucher cooperator elk permits are provided to landowners/lessees who provide elk hunter access to their property. The Voucher Cooperator Elk Permit Program links people who own or lease elk hunting land with hunters who have drawn an elk permit. Hunter access is accomplished by offering landowners/lessees an elk permit when they accumulate 20 points (harvested bull = 2 points, harvested cow = 1 point). Hunters will sign up to hunt voucher properties on a first come, first served basis through an online system after the area drawing is complete. Interested landowners and lessees may contact Kentucky Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-858-1549 to learn more about the Voucher Cooperator Elk Permit Program.
    • Elk Restoration Permits are provided to landowners/lessees who allow KDFWR staff to relocate elk from their property as part of an ongoing restoration effort. Landowners/lessees receive an elk permit when they accumulate 20 points (relocated bull = 2 points, relocated cow = 1 point). Elk Restoration Permits are only valid on property owned or leased by the landowner/lessee who provided capture access for elk relocation efforts. Elk Restoration Permits are transferrable.

    Link to information and application site-
    https://fw.ky.gov/hunt/pages/elk-hunting-regs.aspx
     
  16. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    All dates have been updated except for the PA Elk Application period- I will update that in early Summer, when the application date is confirmed.

    Don't forget Wyoming Elk applications are coming due later this month......

    To those of you that sent me PM's- good luck in your future endeavors. You will love it out West!!
     
  17. Deehntr56,
    thanks for all the info... now you got me dreaming about going hunting out west! :)
     
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  18. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    You'll enjoy the experience....nothing like it.

    Here is another tool to wade thru the preference point and odds-plug in the desired information and it will upload the drawing odds in units.

    http://www.toprut.com/hunt/wyoming-antelope/
     
  19. Deehntr56

    Deehntr56 Staff Member Mod

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    Update on the Western WY deer herd after last years hard winter for planning purposes.....

    Mule deer in western Wyoming are bouncing back after suffering harsh impacts from last year’s winter.

    1/16/2018 9:42:21 AM

    CHEYENNE - Mule deer in western Wyoming are bouncing back after suffering harsh impacts from last year’s winter. As part of an extended five-year study on mule deer in the West, the Wyoming Range Project, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department reports mule deer does entered the winter with the some the highest body fat accumulations seen in recent years. This means a good foundation for high fawn production and survival in the spring, and biologists are optimistic this herd is on the road to recovery.

    The winter of 2016-2017 was one of the harshest and most impactful on big game in Western Wyoming. It had been 5 years since mule deer in western Wyoming experienced elevated mortality due to ongoing frigid conditions. The Wyoming Range mule deer herd was especially impacted and the Wyoming Range Mule Deer Project is looking at the the impacts of winter in relation to population dynamics. Population dynamics include adult survival, pregnancy, reproduction, fawn survival, and how deer migrate seasonally between important habitats —migration corridors. One of the most pressing issues related to this deer population currently is fawn survival.

    “We know that because of the effects of the winter and the stresses these does were exposed to in 2016-17 their fawn survival was greatly reduced,” Gary Fralick said, a Jackson area biologist. “And we know that fawns were dying because of poor body condition and malnutrition. Many of the fawns were stillborn in May and June of 2017, and we lost some fawns to predation and by other accidents as well—disease played a role in the survival of the 2017 fawn crop, and so now we want to continue to monitor the rate of recovery of this population.”

    This past fall, Game and Fish Managers and University of Wyoming Researchers documented that does are benefiting from good habitat conditions; the snowpack that accumulated in the Wyoming and Salt Ranges helped to produce an exceptional amount of high quality forage for deer to eat. And, because many does were without fawns, the abundant forage resulted in an increase in the animals’ fat reserves.

    “Provided the winter continues to stay mild, we will have extremely high over-winter survival, which will be the initial year of the recovery. Fawns that are born with healthy weights and are able to survive the rigors of the first four to five months of life, will be crucial to the road to recovery,” Fralick said.

    Hunters should also see good buck hunting in the west.

    “High winter mortality did impact the number bucks checked in during the 2017 hunting season, but we were also able to sustain a fairly good buck harvest in spite of the effects of the winter. We believe that with two or three years of high over-winter survival, hunters will enjoy some of the best buck hunting that they’ve observed prior to the effects of the 2017 winter, and so we’re confident of that recovery potential because we’ve observed it in the past, and so the next two to three years will be essential in aiding that recovery, and this initial start of a mild winter will go a long ways into starting that initial phase of the recovery of the Wyoming Range herd,” Fralick said.

    Over the next three to five years, depending on winter severity, Game and Fish will continue to document recovery and survival rates in each age class of fawns. The next capture will be in March, and wildlife managers plan to assess the number of fetuses that each doe is carrying and document body weight of the does and their body condition as they depart the winter ranges.

    https://wgfd.wyo.gov/News/Wyoming-Range-mule-deer-showing-signs-of-recovery