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Yes, I do intend on doing my own loads in the future. That will be my next project. I have enough guns now that will most definitely justify purchasing everything I need to load my own ammo. I will be looking for advise in the future here soon on that subject.
Stop what u r doing or thinking....it's addictive......
 

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Yes, I do intend on doing my own loads in the future. That will be my next project. I have enough guns now that will most definitely justify purchasing everything I need to load my own ammo. I will be looking for advise in the future here soon on that subject.
when ya start let me know. I load 9mm, 38spl, 44mag, 45-70, 223rem. Glad to help and offer up some advice on gear, supplies, places for best prices, etc.
 

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This evening I hunted in the field that I mentioned I was going to earlier due to the wind conditions. I got settled in approximately 7:00 p.m. as it was pretty much as dark as it was going get for tonight.

I started off with a couple of different series of coyotes calls from my electronic caller, one being of a hiper female and the other being of an aggressive male. Then waited for about 20-30 minutes before I started another set and that being of multiple coyotes barking. Then waited another 15 minutes or so. No response and no show yet. I was trying to simulate what I hear around here often at night when the coyotes are fairly active.

I told the wife that I was only going to hunt until the moon rises above the trees, which was approximately 8:30 p.m. Shortly before the moon did rise above those trees, I started another set of calls of males howling. Right off the bat, I got an immediate response from the woods in front of me. (And let me tell you, I love these 'Gen-3 Wicked Lights'. The field I was hunting was much larger than the area I was trying to cover, which was approximately 250w x 450l yards I was covering, about half of that field. I had no issues picking up any of the details along the field/woodline edges through my scope. Very pleased with my rifle setup.) That coyote eventually quit barking and didn't show itself.

Anyhow, I hunted right up until 9:00 p.m., then packed it up and headed home. Once I got into my truck and started driving home, the very next field over to the West, just on the other side of those woods and creek I was hunting, was a coyote heading East, right towards the area I was set up at. That coyote wasn't 50 feet from the road when I drove past him, and it appeared that it was in a hurry.

Oh well, I'll try again perhaps tomorrow morning. All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed the hunt and it was an absolutely beautiful night with crystal clear skies, bright stars and the magnificat moon. I think I'm hooked on this gig! :)
So for lunch today, I ran out to range my new Savage Axis WIN .308 rifle in for longer distances for the first time beyond 100 yards using 'Federal American Eagle 130 grain JHP' bullets.

View attachment 27717

Two things I wanted to accomplish, which was longer range capability with these bullets and if my scope would hold zero after shooting several rounds. The temperature was 37 degrees with gusting headwinds from the ESE at 8-15 mph. Target is 350 yards straight away in the middle of the photograph.

View attachment 27718

I shot two 10 round clips at 350 yards. The middle target was my first set of 10 where I hit the 7" target 6 out of 10 times while continuing to further adjust my scope for the 350 yard range and gusty winds. The top target was after I fully completed the adjustment on the scope for 350 yards and winds. I hit the target 8 out of the 10 times. By that time, I was dealing with significant mirage, both from the sun heat and the rifle barrel.

View attachment 27720

I admit that I'm still trying to get used to shooting my new rifle and I don't consider myself to be a regular long range shooter by any means. After my first twenty rounds, I went back to 100 yards and readjusted my scope back to zero. I shot the two smaller 4 round clips and I didn't make any adjustments after setting the riflescope back to zero, so I'm quite pleased with these results. I shot from the prone position and didn't try any other position.

View attachment 27719

I can honestly say that I now have more confidence in my rifle after shooting this afternoon for about an hour. My next hunting setup will be in a huge open field that may present an opportunity to take a longer range shot. That's why I went out this afternoon while the weather was still decent.

I fulling intend on doing more range shooting later into the year when the warmer temperatures settle in. I recently ordered 200 more rounds of the 'Federal Gold MatchKings Boat Tail 168 Grain' and a 10" AR500 steel target gong.
That's a damn good group with a hot barrel, a very good group with a cold too!! Now go kill them damn yotes!!
 

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Appreciate the advice!

I do have good shooting bags that I would typically use, however I wanted a simulate a hunting position with the bi-pod that I believe I'll be using when I go to hunt that larger field later in the week. At least now I know for sure where the elevation needs to be on the scope turret (@6 up) for 350 yards for that bullet and my "zero" is @0 for 100 yards when I finished sighting the rifle in weeks ago. Today's test proved it held "zero" after several rounds at 350 yards, which makes me very happy!

I did let the rifle barrel cool somewhat in between clips, but not nearly enough because I needed to get back home as quickly as I could. If I had more time, I would've cleaned the barrel in between clips and let the rifle cool completely, but I really didn't have that kind of time this afternoon.

Yeap, there's room for improvement going forward and I'm sure the Federal MatchKings will group even better. I will say I was pleasantly surprised on these varmint hunting rounds considering the coefficient (0.263) on them.

Like I said, I now have more confidence in my rifle after today's little test. I truly had no idea how well it would do beyond 100 yards before today.
Those shots are all dead coyotes!!
 

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One thing to look out for wildlife; Check to see if the weight of the rifle sitting on the bipod pushes the front of the stock up into the barrel, essentially removing the barrel's float in the stock. To do this, sit the rifle on the bipod and try to slide a piece of paper between the stock and the barrel. That's another advantage of a wood stock. Those factory stocks flex a lot. I'd love to see slow motion video, especially with a .308!!!! Yikes!!!
I have seen guys doe all kinds of things to try and get the plastic to shoot like wood. I don't think anyone has done it. However they do have more money in some of them then what a good wooden stock would have cost them!! Boyd's has a very nice stock at a reasonable price.
 

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Cool beans!

I have a .380, 9mm, 357, .38, 22, 30/30 and then of course the .308. I'm even considering reloading shotgun shells and get back in trap shooting once again. I'll definitely let you know once I'm ready, thanks!
I have loaded 357, 38's, 30-30's in the past but none of those lately, I have many of the pistol shells loaded. And I think I have some extra casings laying around somewhere for them. Lately ( the last several years) I have been loading 30-06, 270, 222, 308 Norma magnum, and 300 win. mag. rounds. It isn't hard to do, but you have to go by the loading manuals instructions to be safe.
 

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Just so there's no misconception regarding what I have spent on my original rifle stock...

My Savage Axis original stock modifications was far less than any Boyds replacement stock. Let's say, a Boyds Varmint stock with nothing fancy done to it by them is going right now for $153.00.

I, on the other hand, chose to spend less than $60.00 into my original stock by simply adding more material to it to make it more accurate, more rigid, more heavier and more balanced. The feel for the original rifle stock was good enough for me at the time.

$56.00 = modifying the original stock.
$153.00 = basic Boyds Savage Axis replacement stock.
$97.00 = savings.


By the time I would have finished doing what I would've wanted to do with a Boyds stock for my rifle, it would've atleast cost me well over $200.00 and that's why I stuck with the original stock for right now. I may change out the original stock later down the road if I feel like it will be worth the cost, however for right now, I'm quite impressed and pleased with it's current configuration and capability. The true investment went into my scope and the action upgrades of the rifle, like the trigger, bolt handle and muzzle brake, which I can always transfer onto another stock down the road if I choose to do so.

Hope that I clarified that for others that may be paying attention, thanks!
what bolt handle did you get?
 

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Just so there's no misconception regarding what I have spent on my original rifle stock...

My Savage Axis original stock modifications was far less than any Boyds replacement stock. Let's say, a Boyds Varmint stock with nothing fancy done to it by them is going right now for $153.00.

I, on the other hand, chose to spend less than $60.00 into my original stock by simply adding more material to it to make it more accurate, more rigid, more heavier and more balanced. The feel for the original rifle stock was good enough for me at the time.

$56.00 = modifying the original stock.
$153.00 = basic Boyds Savage Axis replacement stock.
$97.00 = savings.


By the time I would have finished doing what I would've wanted to do with a Boyds stock for my rifle, it would've atleast cost me well over $200.00 and that's why I stuck with the original stock for right now. I may change out the original stock later down the road if I feel like it will be worth the cost, however for right now, I'm quite impressed and pleased with it's current configuration and capability. The true investment went into my scope and the action upgrades of the rifle, like the trigger, bolt handle and muzzle brake, which I can always transfer onto another stock down the road if I choose to do so.

Hope that I clarified that for others that may be paying attention, thanks!
Was not referring to you in anyway, I was just repeating what I saw in another forum. I wouldn't have thought that you had that much in yours, since you made the channel larger yourself. And watching a Boyds video it shows him taking the barreled action off of one gun and putting it directly into the new wooden stock. The stock does not need any other work done to it in order to use it. Now I could see someone making the finish a little different, but they are basically ready to go. I watched the video for a 783 Remington. Sorry if you though I was talking about what you had in your stock, I was just stating that it may be impossible to improve a plastic molded stock to be as ridged as a wooden stock. Go kill them yotes!!
 

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True to some extent, however for me, I still would want to pillar bed and glass bed the action to the new Boyds stock for my caliper. I also would replace all the cheap plastic parts that comes standard with Boyds stocks. For instance, the latch piece for the clip and the trigger guard. Both well known for breaking for larger calibers. Those would be considered upgrades at a cost. I also wouldn't use their standard butt stock pad. I would want a much thicker and softer one, plus I would possibly need a cheek rest for it, depending whether or not what style of stock I bought from them and/or if it worked for me.

So, with all that in mind, like I mentioned earlier, that kind of cost investment into a new Boyds stock, no matter our I looked at it, would've run me well over $200.00 today. Yes, they are very beautiful to look at and the wood is by far more solid than any original polymer stock, but I just couldn't justify making that move just yet. At least not until I started shooting my rifle to see what kinds of results I would be getting after making these easy and less expensive modifications to the original stock. So far, I'm pleased with what I have for the money.

I always know that I could always upgrade the stock latter on down the road if I want to make that kind of investment on the rifle.
The parts you mentioned are part of my barreled action and not part of the wood stock. While the Boyd stock is pillar bedded it is not also glass bedded, that could be done if wished, but not expensive if done yourself. I was taught by a 1000 yard bench rest shooter how he did it. He would use regular glass body filler and wrap his action with some news paper where it would meet the bedding material and bolt the action onto the stock. He did a 300 Win. Mag. for me in the early 70's that shot under a 10" group at 1000 yards, and that was with a flyer. So I know his method worked. But that stuff don't have to even be done unless you are shooting long range or competition. You should be good to go now for any range that you will most likely shoot at a coyote. You can do the bedding later during some tinker time. Go kill them damn yotes!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
As far as I know, none of the 'Savage Axis' 'Boyds' style wood stocks come already pillar bedded today, and the trigger guard and latch piece for the clip is indeed plastic with their standard sale for the Axis model. Not part of the action.

The general consensus of Boyds gunstocks in the gun community from what I have seen and heard recently, is that they are charging more more today for less quality than what they were a few years ago. Whether it's true or not, I wouldn't really know because I do not own a Boyds stock. Though, I have done what I consider a fair amount of research on the topic for my model rifle.

Regardless, I appreciate your input on the matter. Yes, I will do my very best to "kill them damn yotes!"

Thank you!
I bought a matte black metal trigger guard from Boyds when I bought my stock. 145.00 and they laser checkered it for free. Should have been $40 for checking. I have Boyd's stocks on my .17 wsm and my .223 and am very pleased with both. They were totally drop in fit on both rifles. Everything fit perfectly. Having access to cnc machinery at work, I've thought about making the part the magazine snaps into. Was thinking 7075 aluminum then black hard anodizing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #94 · (Edited)
It would take more than $30 of my time to make it. By the time I write a program, set all the cutters up, load the program and machine the part. Not really worth it to run one part. That being said, I just ordered one off ebay. Wasn't aware anybody was making them. Thanks!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 ·
Heading out later tonight to a new spot. Good conditions for it and there's a dead deer carcass in the field. It's 150w x 120l yard field downhill from where I'll be setting up at. It's where I have several videos of coyotes traveling to and from this area over the last few months. I'll head out around 10:00 p.m. and finish up before the moon rises at 11:30 p.m. We'll see what happens!

View attachment 27727

Buck tree rubs from last season:
View attachment 27728
Good luck!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #97 ·
there is a guy selling the mag clip and 2 pillars for like $30. its something tactical I cant remember the name.
The mag snap I just ordered is one piece with the pillar. Just like the one in Wildlife's picture. $37.25 with shipping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #99 · (Edited)
Yes but the other bolt should be pillared too. :)
Already is. If that one isn't pillared you have issues with the safety not engaging in a Boyd's stock with a Timney trigger. Already pillared that one for that reason. If you tighten the rear screw too much, without a pillar to take up the space it pulls the trigger mechanism up. Gun will fire as soon as you push the safety off.
 

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I bought a matte black metal trigger guard from Boyds when I bought my stock. 145.00 and they laser checkered it for free. Should have been $40 for checking. I have Boyd's stocks on my .17 wsm and my .223 and am very pleased with both. They were totally drop in fit on both rifles. Everything fit perfectly. Having access to cnc machinery at work, I've thought about making the part the magazine snaps into. Was thinking 7075 aluminum then black hard anodizing it.
I rechecked and what it said I apparently assumed it was bedded at least in some manner. It said that Boyd's stocks are machined from the most stable materials to maintain a free floated barrel. My trigger guard is reused and my clip release is part of my gun. Mr. Boyd is seen replacing the stock of the same model gun that I have and is replacing it with the type of stock that I want to get, a laminated thumbhole stock. It takes him less than 2 minutes to change it. Here is how you can see it. Type this in and then when it comes up click on the guy with the light colored shirt in the top left corner, it shows the video length time at 1.59, this is Mr. Boyd. Type in ; Boyd's replacement gunstocks for the Remington 783 long action rifles. You will see him change it. They do reinforce them with cross bolts and fitted to be free floated, but I would also glass bed it, even if it was pillar bedded.
 
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